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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10. Search the whole document.

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Toulon (France) (search for this): chapter 6
onsummation of the confederation by demanding that the public lands north-west of the Ohio should first be recognised as the common property of all the states, and held as a common resource to discharge the debts contracted by congress for the Chap. V.} 1778. July 8. expenses of the war. Gerard to Vergennes, Philadelphia, 12 August, 1778. On the eighth of July the French fleet, consisting of twelve ships of the line and three frigates, after a rough voyage of nearly ninety days from Toulon, anchored in the bay of Delaware; ten days too late to intercept the inferior squadron of Lord Howe and its multitude of transports on their retreat from Philadelphia. Its admiral, the Count d'estaing, a major-general in the French army, had persuaded Marie Antoinette to propose the expedition. On the eleventh, congress learned from his letters 11. that he was ready to co-operate with the states in the reduction of the British army and navy. The first invitation to a concert of measures
Fort Niagara (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
gned, when Vergennes wrote that it was almost physically impossible for the English to wrest independence from them; that all efforts, however great, would be powerless to recall a people so thoroughly determined to refuse submission. On the side of the sea, from Nova Scotia to Florida, the British held no post except the island of Rhode Island and New York city with a small circle around its bay. No hostile foot rested on the mainland of New England. The British were still at Ogdensburg, Niagara, and Detroit; but the Americans held the country from below the Highlands to the water-shed of Ontario. Over the Mississippi and its eastern tributary streams the British flag waved no more. The Americans had gained vigor in the conflict: the love and the exercise of individual liberty, though they hindered the efficiency of government, made them unconquerable. The British soldier had nothing before him but to be transferred from one of the many provinces of Britain to another, perhaps
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
manifesto to the members of congress, the several assemblies, and other inhabitants of America, that their persistence in separating from Great Britain would change the whole nature and future conduct of this war; that the extremes of war should so distress the people and desolate the country, as to make them of little avail to France. Congress published the paper in the gazettes to convince the people of the insidious designs of the commissioners. In the British house of commons, Coke of Norfolk proposed an address to the king to disavow the declaration. Lord George Germain defended it, insisting that the Americans by their alliance were become French, and should in future be treated as Frenchmen. Burke pointed out that the dreadful menace was pronounced against those who, conscious of rectitude, stood up to fight for freedom and country. No quarter, said the commissioner Johnstone, who in changing sides on the American question had not tamed the fury of his manner, no quarter o
Halifax (Canada) (search for this): chapter 6
at, would be powerless to recall a people so thoroughly determined to refuse submission. On the side of the sea, from Nova Scotia to Florida, the British held no post except the island of Rhode Island and New York city with a small circle around itanuary, 1778, confessed to Lord North: The time may come when it will be wise to abandon all North America but Canada, Nova Scotia, and the Floridas; but then the generality of the nation must see it first in that light. Donne, II. 118. Lord Rockle Clinton was reporting to Germain that he would probably be under the necessity of evacuating New York and retiring to Halifax, Sir H. Clinton to Lord George Germain, 27 July, 1778. the French fleet, with thirty-five hundred land troops on boarer commissioners to Germain, New York, 5 Sept., 1778. Sir Henry Clinton threatened to evacuate New York and to retire to Halifax, Clinton to Germain, 27 July, 1778. remonstrated against being reduced to a starved defensive, Clinton to Haldiman
West Indies (search for this): chapter 6
exercise of individual liberty, though they hindered the efficiency of government, made them unconquerable. The British soldier had nothing before him but to be transferred from one of the many provinces of Britain to another, perhaps to the West Indies, perhaps to India: he did what he was Chap. V.} 1778. bound to do with the skill of a veteran; but he had no ennobling motive, no prospect of a home, and no living patriotism. The American looked beyond danger to the enjoyment of freedom ands continuance. Should the Americans ratify the French alliance, Lord Amherst, who was the guide of the ministry in the conduct of the war, recommended the evacuation of New York and Rhode Island and the employment of the troops against the French West Indies. But the radical change of opinion was shown most clearly by the votes of parliament. In February, 1774, the house of commons, in a moment of unrestrained passion; adopted measures for enforcing the traditional absolutism of parliament
Little Egg Harbor (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
menaces of the proclamation were a confession of weakness. The British army under Clinton could hold no part of the country, and only ravage and destroy by sudden expeditions. Towards the end of Sept. September Cornwallis led a foray into New Jersey; and Major-General Grey with a party of infantry, surprising Baylor's light horse, used the bayonet mercilessly against men that sued for quarter. A band led by Captain Patrick Ferguson in October, Oct. after destroying the shipping in Little Egg harbor, spread through the neighboring country to burn the houses and waste the lands of the patriots. On the night of the fifteenth they surprised light infantry under Pulaski's command; and, cumbering themselves with no prisoners, killed all they could. In November a large party of Indians with bands of Nov. tories and regulars entered Cherry valley by an unguarded pass, and, finding the fort too strong to be taken, murdered and scalped more than thirty of the Chap. V.} 1778. Nov. inha
Vergennes (search for this): chapter 6
s. Regret prevailed that these also had not been forgiven. Before the co-operation of the arms of France the Americans had substantially achieved their existence as a nation. The treaties of alliance with them had not yet been signed, when Vergennes wrote that it was almost physically impossible for the English to wrest independence from them; that all efforts, however great, would be powerless to recall a people so thoroughly determined to refuse submission. On the side of the sea, from ic lands north-west of the Ohio should first be recognised as the common property of all the states, and held as a common resource to discharge the debts contracted by congress for the Chap. V.} 1778. July 8. expenses of the war. Gerard to Vergennes, Philadelphia, 12 August, 1778. On the eighth of July the French fleet, consisting of twelve ships of the line and three frigates, after a rough voyage of nearly ninety days from Toulon, anchored in the bay of Delaware; ten days too late to
ange the whole nature and future conduct of this war; that the extremes of war should so distress the people and desolate the country, as to make them of little avail to France. Congress published the paper in the gazettes to convince the people of the insidious designs of the commissioners. In the British house of commons, Coke of Norfolk proposed an address to the king to disavow the declaration. Lord George Germain defended it, insisting that the Americans by their alliance were become French, and should in future be treated as Frenchmen. Burke pointed out that the dreadful menace was pronounced against those who, conscious of rectitude, stood up to fight for freedom and country. No quarter, said the commissioner Johnstone, who in changing sides on the American question had not tamed the fury of his manner, no quarter ought to be shown to their congress; and, if the infernals could be let loose against them, I should approve of the measure. The proclamation certainly does mean
red by legislative authority after a notice of ninety days. None but freeholders could elect or be elected to office; and for the higher offices the possession of a large freehold was required. In any redistribution of the representation of the state, the number of white inhabitants and the amount of taxable property were to be considered. The veto power was taken from the president. Till this time the church of England had been the established church in South Carolina. The toleration of Locke and Shaftesbury was now mixed with the religious faith of its people. Not the Anglican or Episcopal church, but the Christian Protestant church, was declared to be the established religion of the state; and none but Protestants were eligible to high executive or any legislative office. The right of suffrage was conferred exclusively on every free white man who, having the requisite age and freehold, acknowledged God and a future state of rewards and punishments. All persons who so believe
one thousand each, and they were followed by a further detachment. Directing Sullivan, who was placed over the district of Rhode Island, to throw the American troop continent independent. On the eighth the French fleet, which a whim of 8. Sullivan had detained for ten days in the offing, ran past the British batteries into tarning that the British outpost on the north of the island had been withdrawn, Sullivan, on the morning of the ninth, without notice to d'estaing, crossed 9. with hia, he was compelled by his instructions to sail for Boston. In general orders Sullivan censured d'estaing, and insinuated the inutility of the French alliance; and tAmericans, forty-nine less. On the night following the thirtieth, the army of Sullivan, evading 30. its sluggish pursuers, withdrew from the island. Clinton, with n America. The people of New England had in twenty days raised the force of Sullivan to ten thousand effective men; the total disappointment of their hope of brill
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