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e than two or three of whom had ever travelled by railroad before. Though at the risk of trying your patience too long, I should like to say a few words of some of my old Medford friends who have passed away—some of whom I hope may still be kindly remembered by some of you. Let me mention Mr. P. C. Brooks, then probably the richest man in New England, Rev. Caleb Stetson, well esteemed even among those who differed most widely from his religious views, the elder E. F. Hastings, D. Hall, Captain King, father of Mrs. D. C. Hall, Rev. C. Brooks and T. Cotting, with both the latter of whom I was associated many years on the school committee, and Mary and Lucy Osgood, who had a celebrity in the scholarly society of the vicinity not limited to Medford. They were intelligent, highly cultivated, well versed in ancient and modern languages and literature, taking up the study of German after reaching the age of fifty. Mary, the elder, was bright, quick in forming her opinions or prejudices,
Lydia Francis (search for this): chapter 21
— Mr. Harlow, are you a sinner? I pleaded guilty, quoting the assembly's catechism as evidence. Well, said she, if you are a sinner, come and take tea with us to-night; a few of our friends will be here to pass the evening, and they will all be saints but you; and as I think a party is pleasanter for being a little mixed, I want a sinner or two to make it more agreeable. Of course I accepted, and with only one layman but myself met half a dozen ministers and theologues of the best the neighborhood afforded, among them Rev. Dr. Furness, Mr. Stetson, I think Dr. Francis, Joseph Angier, Nathaniel Hall, and George I. Briggs; and the cheerfulness and spirit of the evening justified her prediction. I have endeavored to comply with the limited task assigned me. If I have trespassed too long on your patience consider that I had you at my mercy and could have detained you much longer; and remember with the poet Burns, What's done we partly can compute, But know not what's resisted
Alexander Scammell Brooks (search for this): chapter 21
d, two of whom, Edmund Gates and Abiel R. Shed, were killed in battle. Another distinguished son of Medford, Alexander Scammell Brooks, eldest son of Governor Brooks, made a good reputation in this war. Born in Medford in 1777, he entered HarvardGovernor Brooks, made a good reputation in this war. Born in Medford in 1777, he entered Harvard College in 1801, and leaving it in 1804 entered the merchant service as a mariner. But the Embargo of 1808, so destructive to the mercantile prosperity of New England, closed that career for a time, but it was renewed soon after, and he returned tor Roxbury. The incident was a source of amusement in the papers at the time, and caricatures of it were printed. Colonel Brooks, though stationed from time to time in various parts of the country with his command, made Medford his home when perd all praise, and will ever be held in grateful remembrance by their townsmen and their country. I have spoken of Governor Brooks. It was once my good fortune to see him. In 1819, when he was governor and the district (now State) of Maine was a
ty, not more than two or three of whom had ever travelled by railroad before. Though at the risk of trying your patience too long, I should like to say a few words of some of my old Medford friends who have passed away—some of whom I hope may still be kindly remembered by some of you. Let me mention Mr. P. C. Brooks, then probably the richest man in New England, Rev. Caleb Stetson, well esteemed even among those who differed most widely from his religious views, the elder E. F. Hastings, D. Hall, Captain King, father of Mrs. D. C. Hall, Rev. C. Brooks and T. Cotting, with both the latter of whom I was associated many years on the school committee, and Mary and Lucy Osgood, who had a celebrity in the scholarly society of the vicinity not limited to Medford. They were intelligent, highly cultivated, well versed in ancient and modern languages and literature, taking up the study of German after reaching the age of fifty. Mary, the elder, was bright, quick in forming her opinions or
e last of his descendants, lately deceased. In June, 1833, before going to college, I came here and took charge for one year of the grammar school kept in the west end of the little one-story whitewashed brick school-house standing in the rear of the church and west of the horse sheds. In the other end of the building was a school for little children, taught by Miss Jane Symmes (afterwards Mrs. Hunt), whom many of you doubtless remember. The only other grammar school in town was kept by Alexander Gregg, afterwards a coal dealer, in a one-story brick building on Cross street, within the grounds of the present cemetery. Who could then have imagined the change which sixty years have made, or dreamed of the magnificent palaces in which our children now are taught? There were, a little before and for many years afterwards, two or three private schools of wide reputation. The first of these was kept by Hannah Swan, sister of Dr. Swan, in the large house on Forest street removed a f
J. Manning (search for this): chapter 21
ick building on Cross street, within the grounds of the present cemetery. Who could then have imagined the change which sixty years have made, or dreamed of the magnificent palaces in which our children now are taught? There were, a little before and for many years afterwards, two or three private schools of wide reputation. The first of these was kept by Hannah Swan, sister of Dr. Swan, in the large house on Forest street removed a few years ago to make room for the house occupied by J. Manning. After she left, the house was taken by Mr. John Angier, who kept a boarding-school there for many years, and had scholars from other States and from the West Indies. The Misses Bradbury kept an excellent school for young ladies, boarders and others, on South street. Mrs. Russell, mother of the late Governor Russell, told me she attended school there. During the first half of the century, and until the fourteenth amendment of the Constitution in 1855, a majority of voters, instead of
his descendants, lately deceased. In June, 1833, before going to college, I came here and took charge for one year of the grammar school kept in the west end of the little one-story whitewashed brick school-house standing in the rear of the church and west of the horse sheds. In the other end of the building was a school for little children, taught by Miss Jane Symmes (afterwards Mrs. Hunt), whom many of you doubtless remember. The only other grammar school in town was kept by Alexander Gregg, afterwards a coal dealer, in a one-story brick building on Cross street, within the grounds of the present cemetery. Who could then have imagined the change which sixty years have made, or dreamed of the magnificent palaces in which our children now are taught? There were, a little before and for many years afterwards, two or three private schools of wide reputation. The first of these was kept by Hannah Swan, sister of Dr. Swan, in the large house on Forest street removed a few years
John Angier (search for this): chapter 21
present cemetery. Who could then have imagined the change which sixty years have made, or dreamed of the magnificent palaces in which our children now are taught? There were, a little before and for many years afterwards, two or three private schools of wide reputation. The first of these was kept by Hannah Swan, sister of Dr. Swan, in the large house on Forest street removed a few years ago to make room for the house occupied by J. Manning. After she left, the house was taken by Mr. John Angier, who kept a boarding-school there for many years, and had scholars from other States and from the West Indies. The Misses Bradbury kept an excellent school for young ladies, boarders and others, on South street. Mrs. Russell, mother of the late Governor Russell, told me she attended school there. During the first half of the century, and until the fourteenth amendment of the Constitution in 1855, a majority of voters, instead of a plurality as now, was required for the election of
George I. Briggs (search for this): chapter 21
e— Mr. Harlow, are you a sinner? I pleaded guilty, quoting the assembly's catechism as evidence. Well, said she, if you are a sinner, come and take tea with us to-night; a few of our friends will be here to pass the evening, and they will all be saints but you; and as I think a party is pleasanter for being a little mixed, I want a sinner or two to make it more agreeable. Of course I accepted, and with only one layman but myself met half a dozen ministers and theologues of the best the neighborhood afforded, among them Rev. Dr. Furness, Mr. Stetson, I think Dr. Francis, Joseph Angier, Nathaniel Hall, and George I. Briggs; and the cheerfulness and spirit of the evening justified her prediction. I have endeavored to comply with the limited task assigned me. If I have trespassed too long on your patience consider that I had you at my mercy and could have detained you much longer; and remember with the poet Burns, What's done we partly can compute, But know not what's resisted
y spare you repetition of an old story. The Middlesex Canal I see has already been treated, and I will not dwell upon that; yet I have some very pleasant recollections connected with it, of which you will permit me to say a word, as it relates rather to the poetic than to the business uses of the canal. When I was here as a young man—I am afraid the custom is not so faithfully kept up now—it was customary to make walking parties of young men and ladies. One of our favorite walks was to Rockhill, on the land of Mr. Hastings, to see the sun set. Another, and perhaps the best, was up the banks of the canal, and through the grounds of Mr. P. C. Brooks, to the parting of the ponds —the spot where the dam of the Mystic Water Works now stands. As the canal boats came along, as they constantly did, they were always ready, when asked, to sheer up to the bank and take us on board, and so we passed on, through the beautiful single-arched stone bridge in the grounds of Mr. Brooks, and then, <
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