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John Bunyan (search for this): chapter 9
d the strip of land bordering the river, and extending back a mile in all places, that comprised the Medford of those days, making the thirty-one years ye olde meeting-house was used. A. D. 1693, William and Mary had been for five years the reigning sovereigns and the town meetings were called in their majesties names. The witchcraft delusion at Salem had just run its length and subsided without thrusting its baleful presence and influence into Medford. Beyond the sea in old England, John Bunyan, the immortal dreamer, and Richard Baxter, the voluminous writer, had but just passed away. The Pilgrim's Progress of the one, and Saint's Rest of the other were beginning to reach these shores. John Dryden, the poet and translator of Virgil, and John Locke, the mental philosopher of that age, were just completing their life work, while the great architect, Sir Christopher Wren, was in his prime. But four years had passed since Sir Edmund Andros had been sent home to England, and o
John Locke (search for this): chapter 9
and the town meetings were called in their majesties names. The witchcraft delusion at Salem had just run its length and subsided without thrusting its baleful presence and influence into Medford. Beyond the sea in old England, John Bunyan, the immortal dreamer, and Richard Baxter, the voluminous writer, had but just passed away. The Pilgrim's Progress of the one, and Saint's Rest of the other were beginning to reach these shores. John Dryden, the poet and translator of Virgil, and John Locke, the mental philosopher of that age, were just completing their life work, while the great architect, Sir Christopher Wren, was in his prime. But four years had passed since Sir Edmund Andros had been sent home to England, and one Medford man is credited with saying, If Andros comes to Medford we'll treat him not with shad and alewives but with swordfish. Possibly if this ancient Medfordite could now return, he would find a different taste prevailing in the matter of a fish diet; and
August 21st, 1727 AD (search for this): chapter 9
own again, and the result was like a fusillade of musketry all over the house. Mr. Porter's pastorate was all too short, as he died after serving the church and town nine years, and was succeeded by the Rev. Ebenezer Turell in 1724. He, like his predecessor, took unto himself a wife soon after coming to Medford. Still more room was needed for the accommodation of the people, and after much discussion the town built a new and much larger meeting-house just beyond the brook, and on August 21, 1727, worshipped in the subject of our sketch for the last time. The selectmen were directed to sell it, for the best advantage for the town. I find no report of their doings in the matter on the record; but upon the treasurer's book under date of January 4, 1729, is this item, To Cash Recd of Benj. Willis for ye Old Meeting-house Omitted getting down before. The receipts are entered on the right hand pages of the book, and the page being one of the earliest used, the right, or outer ed
January 4th, 729 AD (search for this): chapter 9
or the town. I find no report of their doings in the matter on the record; but upon the treasurer's book under date of January 4, 1729, is this item, To Cash Recd of Benj. Willis for ye Old Meeting-house Omitted getting down before. The receipts are entered on the right hand pages of the book, and the page being one of the earliest used, the right, or outer edge, is so frayed and worn that the amount paid by Mr. Willis is missing. An interesting matter in this connection is the date January 4, 729. As the town directed the selectmen on September 29, 1729, to sell it and Mr. Willis paid for it on January 4, it was in the eleventh month of the year, which then began with the first of March, instead of January. Another incident is that the entry is not in regular order, but is explained by the written note, Omitted setting down before. Such are the facts gleaned from the ancient records of the town, their time-worn and discolored pages now carefully preserved between silk tissue
September 29th, 1729 AD (search for this): chapter 9
ter on the record; but upon the treasurer's book under date of January 4, 1729, is this item, To Cash Recd of Benj. Willis for ye Old Meeting-house Omitted getting down before. The receipts are entered on the right hand pages of the book, and the page being one of the earliest used, the right, or outer edge, is so frayed and worn that the amount paid by Mr. Willis is missing. An interesting matter in this connection is the date January 4, 729. As the town directed the selectmen on September 29, 1729, to sell it and Mr. Willis paid for it on January 4, it was in the eleventh month of the year, which then began with the first of March, instead of January. Another incident is that the entry is not in regular order, but is explained by the written note, Omitted setting down before. Such are the facts gleaned from the ancient records of the town, their time-worn and discolored pages now carefully preserved between silk tissue. In a careful reading of them, often requiring patien
d. One is the college church. Therefore, to eighteen organized bodies has increased the gathering at John Bradshaw's house on that winter day one hundred and ninety-five years ago. Could Rev. Mr. Woodbridge ride from Charlestown to Medford on horseback, as of yore, he would not have to alight and open the gate across the road near Marble brook ere he could proceed. Mr. Aaron Warner would find his old parish somewhat changed on doctrinal points, but ready to welcome him, and possibly he might not be pleased with the chiming bells and liturgical service across the country road, as he would call High street. Parson Turell would look in vain for his old home, only demolished in recent years. Perchance he might wonder if this was really Meadford. But we may do well, if we of this year of grace, 1906, serve our day and generation, in church and state, in religious and civil duty, as did the men and women who in 1696 built and worshipped in Ye olde first meting-house of Meadford.
March 1st (search for this): chapter 9
ing-house Omitted getting down before. The receipts are entered on the right hand pages of the book, and the page being one of the earliest used, the right, or outer edge, is so frayed and worn that the amount paid by Mr. Willis is missing. An interesting matter in this connection is the date January 4, 729. As the town directed the selectmen on September 29, 1729, to sell it and Mr. Willis paid for it on January 4, it was in the eleventh month of the year, which then began with the first of March, instead of January. Another incident is that the entry is not in regular order, but is explained by the written note, Omitted setting down before. Such are the facts gleaned from the ancient records of the town, their time-worn and discolored pages now carefully preserved between silk tissue. In a careful reading of them, often requiring patient study, and diligent comparison of the quaint expression, and almost phonetic spelling, the writer felt as one becoming introduced to th
December 6th (search for this): chapter 9
that, in the acts of worship and observation of times, everything was diametrically opposite. Even the Holy Scriptures were unread in the meeting-house, and not until 1755 was there a Bible upon the pulpit. No lights gleamed or candles flickered from its windows on Sunday night, for the Sabbath began at sunset on Saturday. One Medford man is credited with having a poor opinion of religion got by candle light. The records say of a town meeting, Adjourned to meet at Stephen Willis' on December 6 at about sunsetting. From twelve to fifteen shillings a year paid for the care of the house, and sometimes the deacon was the caretaker. The duties were sweeping, shutting the casements (possibly there were shutters on the windows, as glass was expensive), and removing the snow from before the doors. Since that day, thirty houses for public worship have been erected within the limits of Medford, and eighteen are now in use as such. Two of the thirty (the second and third built by t
Ye olde Meting-House of Meadford. by Moses W. Mann, West Medford. [Continued from Vol. II, No. 2.] THE seats in the pews were hinged, and turned up on edge as the people stood during the long prayer. This concluded, they were turned down again, and the result was like a fusillade of musketry all over the house. Mr. Porter's pastorate was all too short, as he died after serving the church and town nine years, and was succeeded by the Rev. Ebenezer Turell in 1724. He, like his predecessor, took unto himself a wife soon after coming to Medford. Still more room was needed for the accommodation of the people, and after much discussion the town built a new and much larger meeting-house just beyond the brook, and on August 21, 1727, worshipped in the subject of our sketch for the last time. The selectmen were directed to sell it, for the best advantage for the town. I find no report of their doings in the matter on the record; but upon the treasurer's book under date of Ja
silk tissue. In a careful reading of them, often requiring patient study, and diligent comparison of the quaint expression, and almost phonetic spelling, the writer felt as one becoming introduced to the men and people of the Medford of long ago. So long ago was it, that it is well to take a look beyond the strip of land bordering the river, and extending back a mile in all places, that comprised the Medford of those days, making the thirty-one years ye olde meeting-house was used. A. D. 1693, William and Mary had been for five years the reigning sovereigns and the town meetings were called in their majesties names. The witchcraft delusion at Salem had just run its length and subsided without thrusting its baleful presence and influence into Medford. Beyond the sea in old England, John Bunyan, the immortal dreamer, and Richard Baxter, the voluminous writer, had but just passed away. The Pilgrim's Progress of the one, and Saint's Rest of the other were beginning to reach these
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