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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11.. Search the whole document.

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January 4th (search for this): chapter 9
te of January 4, 1729, is this item, To Cash Recd of Benj. Willis for ye Old Meeting-house Omitted getting down before. The receipts are entered on the right hand pages of the book, and the page being one of the earliest used, the right, or outer edge, is so frayed and worn that the amount paid by Mr. Willis is missing. An interesting matter in this connection is the date January 4, 729. As the town directed the selectmen on September 29, 1729, to sell it and Mr. Willis paid for it on January 4, it was in the eleventh month of the year, which then began with the first of March, instead of January. Another incident is that the entry is not in regular order, but is explained by the written note, Omitted setting down before. Such are the facts gleaned from the ancient records of the town, their time-worn and discolored pages now carefully preserved between silk tissue. In a careful reading of them, often requiring patient study, and diligent comparison of the quaint expressi
January 4th, 1729 AD (search for this): chapter 9
or, took unto himself a wife soon after coming to Medford. Still more room was needed for the accommodation of the people, and after much discussion the town built a new and much larger meeting-house just beyond the brook, and on August 21, 1727, worshipped in the subject of our sketch for the last time. The selectmen were directed to sell it, for the best advantage for the town. I find no report of their doings in the matter on the record; but upon the treasurer's book under date of January 4, 1729, is this item, To Cash Recd of Benj. Willis for ye Old Meeting-house Omitted getting down before. The receipts are entered on the right hand pages of the book, and the page being one of the earliest used, the right, or outer edge, is so frayed and worn that the amount paid by Mr. Willis is missing. An interesting matter in this connection is the date January 4, 729. As the town directed the selectmen on September 29, 1729, to sell it and Mr. Willis paid for it on January 4, it was
ting down before. The receipts are entered on the right hand pages of the book, and the page being one of the earliest used, the right, or outer edge, is so frayed and worn that the amount paid by Mr. Willis is missing. An interesting matter in this connection is the date January 4, 729. As the town directed the selectmen on September 29, 1729, to sell it and Mr. Willis paid for it on January 4, it was in the eleventh month of the year, which then began with the first of March, instead of January. Another incident is that the entry is not in regular order, but is explained by the written note, Omitted setting down before. Such are the facts gleaned from the ancient records of the town, their time-worn and discolored pages now carefully preserved between silk tissue. In a careful reading of them, often requiring patient study, and diligent comparison of the quaint expression, and almost phonetic spelling, the writer felt as one becoming introduced to the men and people of the
uilding the meeting-house was inaugurated. With it as a central rallying point, the sixty year old town was waking to new life, for in the autumn of that year, it adopted Town orders and bylaws. Of the houses that were standing in the Medford of 1696, we can be positively certain of but two that remain today—the Major Jonathan Wade house, and the Capt. Peter Tufts house, commonly called the Cradock House,—if this be treason (or heresy)make the most of it. There is a possibility that the old ight not be pleased with the chiming bells and liturgical service across the country road, as he would call High street. Parson Turell would look in vain for his old home, only demolished in recent years. Perchance he might wonder if this was really Meadford. But we may do well, if we of this year of grace, 1906, serve our day and generation, in church and state, in religious and civil duty, as did the men and women who in 1696 built and worshipped in Ye olde first meting-house of Meadfor
religious license. I find no record of theological differences in the old meeting-house. The Quaker or Baptist may have been there, but that time was long before the Universalist, Unitarian, or Methodist-Episcopal. The churches of England and of Rome, the ancient Medfordites would have none of. This is evident in the fact that, in the acts of worship and observation of times, everything was diametrically opposite. Even the Holy Scriptures were unread in the meeting-house, and not until 1755 was there a Bible upon the pulpit. No lights gleamed or candles flickered from its windows on Sunday night, for the Sabbath began at sunset on Saturday. One Medford man is credited with having a poor opinion of religion got by candle light. The records say of a town meeting, Adjourned to meet at Stephen Willis' on December 6 at about sunsetting. From twelve to fifteen shillings a year paid for the care of the house, and sometimes the deacon was the caretaker. The duties were sweep
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