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July 1st, 1811 AD (search for this): chapter 6
who lived in the Admiral Vernon Tavern, and later in a house built on its site. The public was free to use the water of all these private wells except that of the Misses Tufts. The fifth well was a town one with pump and trough put in at the curb. It was called the Hyde well from being in front of the estate of James Hyde, the grocer, and was commonly supposed to have been a private well. It was located near the building now numbered 56, about where a telephone pole is standing. 1 July, 1811, the selectmen voted To have a new pump placed in the Town's well on the South side of the river near the house of Timo Symmes and a good trough fixed to the same. 5 August, 1811, they voted To pass Samuel Townsend's acct. for a pump in the well opposite the Hotel. Without doubt these two orders refer to the same well, it probably being situated as near Blanchard's Tavern as it was to Timothy Symmes' house. Beyond South street on Main street there was a well on the premises of
July 26th, 1814 AD (search for this): chapter 6
nd died a few years ago, the last of those here mentioned. John T. Cram was a pump maker and lived on the southerly side of Ship street, opposite Pleasant street, in the little house still standing. He furnished a pine pump in 1843 for Malden's town well, at a cost of $16.67. Dec. 7, 1801 Voted To have guide Boards put up in Market place in Medford, in most suitable place. 25 May 1812 Voted To allow Field Vining's account for clearing Water course in market place last winter. July 26, 1814 Voted To pass Timothy Dexter's acct. for making 16 3/4 rods of drain in the market place at $7.63 per rod $127.80. 5 Mar. 1825 Voted To allow Wm. C. Pratt's acct. for Stones to spread in market Place. The term Market Place recalls a phase of life very different from that today in our square: when mercantile affairs were more active, when the citizens relied upon home stores for the necessities of life, and people from great distances came here to barter or sell; when feminine sho
April 30th, 1877 AD (search for this): chapter 6
the introduction of Spot pond water into Medford the pump in the square reached the Oslerism stage of inanimate things, and on March 24, 1873, the decree went forth that sealed its fate, for on that date the selectmen voted that it should be removed by the highway surveyors and the well fixed as a reservoir, and May 18, 1874, Mr. Foster was appointed a committee to sell the Town Pump. June 2, 1873, the highway surveyors were ordered to remove the pump at the head of Mystic avenue, and April 30, 1877, the board ordered the removal of the pump in front of the Hyde estate on Main street, and the filling up of the well. The action of the town in filling up these three wells shows they were town property, but the date of the digging of them is shrouded not perhaps in mystery, but in obscurity. From the well-known position he takes in regard to the location of the Cradock house, it is natural that John H. Hooper should suggest that the well in the market place was dug and used by Matth
October 25th, 1848 AD (search for this): chapter 6
educt from Spot Pond to Boston. As the act of incorporation did not take place, the history of it closes here. The subject of a proper water supply for Boston was still further discussed, and it was the favorite theme of the different city councils through the administrations of many mayors. At last the necessary legislative power was obtained, the great work begun, and amid great demonstrations of joy, with elaborate ceremonies, Cochituate water was let on for the use of Boston, October 25, 1848. After the introduction of Spot pond water into Medford the pump in the square reached the Oslerism stage of inanimate things, and on March 24, 1873, the decree went forth that sealed its fate, for on that date the selectmen voted that it should be removed by the highway surveyors and the well fixed as a reservoir, and May 18, 1874, Mr. Foster was appointed a committee to sell the Town Pump. June 2, 1873, the highway surveyors were ordered to remove the pump at the head of Mystic
almshouse and some at the schoolhouses, as they were built at different times. Medford was slow in coming into her privileges in this last direction. She had had three buildings for the housing of one school, the third, a brick one, dating from 1795, and it is not till March 2, 1807, that we find any record of an attempt being made to furnish water for teacher and pupils. At that time the town passed the following votes: To have a Well dug in Suitable place for the use of the School. That tct, it is not inappropriate to speak briefly here of Boston's former water supply. A portion of it had been supplied from Jamaica pond in West Roxbury, through four main pipes of pitch-pine logs, by the Boston Aqueduct Corporation, chartered in 1795. In 1825, three years after Boston became a city, on recommendation of the city council, a commission was appointed to ascertain the practicability of supplying the city with good water for the domestic use of the inhabitants, as well as for th
September 7th, 1812 AD (search for this): chapter 6
clock brought a continuous flow of water. This handle, placed in line with the spout, was somewhat unwieldy to work, taxed the muscle of the urchins, and it took two small boys to get one good drink. This double pump was incased in wood 34 inches by 16, the back and front having the greater width, and this tower-like structure was about 9 feet high. It is not known when a pump of this description was first put in, but perhaps the following order may shed some light on the subject:— 7 Sept. 1812 Voted To put another pump in the well in the square and repair the old one and set posts and a rail about the well &c. The Salem pump said I am at the head of the fire department, so it was fitting for Medford to put her pumps and reservoirs under the charge of the fire department, and the history of them is best told as we quote quite fully from the reports of the chief engineers. Under the expense of the fire department of 1844 is an item of $25 for damage done to Rebecca Cutter's
March 2nd, 1807 AD (search for this): chapter 6
account of the pump in the market place. The town owned another well not far from the market place south of the river, which we shall notice later on, one at the junction of Main street and Mystic avenue, one at the almshouse and some at the schoolhouses, as they were built at different times. Medford was slow in coming into her privileges in this last direction. She had had three buildings for the housing of one school, the third, a brick one, dating from 1795, and it is not till March 2, 1807, that we find any record of an attempt being made to furnish water for teacher and pupils. At that time the town passed the following votes: To have a Well dug in Suitable place for the use of the School. That the Committee to enlarge the School house be a committee to dig a Well and Fix a pump in the same with a Bason chained on. 5 August, 181, the selectmen approved the bill for a pump for the well at the school-house, and the bills of several people for digging, stoning and brick
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