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November 17th (search for this): chapter 20
he preservation of our local history, and for the entertainment of their auditors or readers. October 20 we were indebted to Rosewell B. Lawrence for the charming account of his summer in Great Britain. He had many varied and pleasant experiences, of which he spoke informally in detail, and so shared with eager listeners his privilege of travelling. All enjoyed the accounts of visits to land of Dickens and trips to quaint London inns, and the recital of a canoe trip on the Thames. November 17 John Albree of Swampscott, our outof-town member and the enthusiastic secretary of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, gave a most interesting paper upon Books and Other Things. He illustrated the address by exhibiting a collection of books selected at random from his own library, valuable for historic interest, or as models of the bookmakers' art. December 15 Rev. Frank I. Paradise of Grace Church, Medford, gave a happy, informal talk(illustrated with maps and pictures) on
Our year's work. THE season of 1913-14 has been unusual, in that the February meeting was omitted on account of a very severe snow-storm. Other meetings have taken place at the regular time. At the annual one in January, for the election of officers, no paper was given. At this time, and also at the opening and closing meetings, light refreshments were served, and social intercourse added to the pleasures of the evening as the various papers were discussed informally by little groups, and friend met friend with happy reminiscences. Our own members or townsmen have served the Society by giving papers, and only twice have people outside of Medford been called upon for this purpose, and one of these is a member of this Society. This is proof enough that there are a faithful few in Medford, loyal to their home town, and ready always to give of their time, strength and talents for the preservation of our local history, and for the entertainment of their auditors or reader
April 20th (search for this): chapter 20
ed at random from his own library, valuable for historic interest, or as models of the bookmakers' art. December 15 Rev. Frank I. Paradise of Grace Church, Medford, gave a happy, informal talk(illustrated with maps and pictures) on Switzerland; A Model Democracy. March 16 Mrs. Ruth Dame-Coolidge graciously entertained our Society with a paper on the Rise of the Gothic Cathedral. It was a scholarly piece of work, given without manuscript, and held her hearers with strong interest. April 20 Moses W. Mann, who has given of himself so much to our Society, and is the indefatigable editor of the Register, read a paper on Medford Bells, some thirty-six in all, containing, as all his papers do, a fund of information. Mr. Elisha B. Curtis and others gave personal reminiscences on the subject, and also of the Medford family noted for their skill in ringing bells and entertaining exhibitions of the same. May 18 Charles Edward Mann, President of the Malden Historical Society, gave a
March 16th (search for this): chapter 20
tof-town member and the enthusiastic secretary of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, gave a most interesting paper upon Books and Other Things. He illustrated the address by exhibiting a collection of books selected at random from his own library, valuable for historic interest, or as models of the bookmakers' art. December 15 Rev. Frank I. Paradise of Grace Church, Medford, gave a happy, informal talk(illustrated with maps and pictures) on Switzerland; A Model Democracy. March 16 Mrs. Ruth Dame-Coolidge graciously entertained our Society with a paper on the Rise of the Gothic Cathedral. It was a scholarly piece of work, given without manuscript, and held her hearers with strong interest. April 20 Moses W. Mann, who has given of himself so much to our Society, and is the indefatigable editor of the Register, read a paper on Medford Bells, some thirty-six in all, containing, as all his papers do, a fund of information. Mr. Elisha B. Curtis and others gave person
iven without manuscript, and held her hearers with strong interest. April 20 Moses W. Mann, who has given of himself so much to our Society, and is the indefatigable editor of the Register, read a paper on Medford Bells, some thirty-six in all, containing, as all his papers do, a fund of information. Mr. Elisha B. Curtis and others gave personal reminiscences on the subject, and also of the Medford family noted for their skill in ringing bells and entertaining exhibitions of the same. May 18 Charles Edward Mann, President of the Malden Historical Society, gave an informal talk on Sam Walter Foss as he knew him in early life, when both were beginning on journalistic careers and undertaking literary work. This interchange of courtesies with our neighbors is a happy phrase of our work. Mrs. Augusta A. Brigham, now of Malden, formerly of Medford, a member of this Society, gave a paper before the New England Historic Genealogical Society this season, and she acquitted herself so
December 15th (search for this): chapter 20
nts of visits to land of Dickens and trips to quaint London inns, and the recital of a canoe trip on the Thames. November 17 John Albree of Swampscott, our outof-town member and the enthusiastic secretary of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, gave a most interesting paper upon Books and Other Things. He illustrated the address by exhibiting a collection of books selected at random from his own library, valuable for historic interest, or as models of the bookmakers' art. December 15 Rev. Frank I. Paradise of Grace Church, Medford, gave a happy, informal talk(illustrated with maps and pictures) on Switzerland; A Model Democracy. March 16 Mrs. Ruth Dame-Coolidge graciously entertained our Society with a paper on the Rise of the Gothic Cathedral. It was a scholarly piece of work, given without manuscript, and held her hearers with strong interest. April 20 Moses W. Mann, who has given of himself so much to our Society, and is the indefatigable editor of the Regi
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