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Mare (Papua New Guinea) (search for this): article 1
Mr. Early had no disposition to exclude any one, and would not countenance secret sessions. But the dignity and decorum of the Convention must be preserved, and the demonstration a few moments ago was the most forcible argument that could be made, in favor of his resolution. Mr. Hall moved to lay the whole subject on the table. Negatived. The substitute was opposed by Mr. Johnson, and rejected by the Convention. Mr.Early's resolution then passed, Federal Relations. Mr.Mare offered the following: Resolved, That Virginia cherishes a devoted attachment to the Union of these States, under the Constitution framed by the wise and patriotic men of the past -- that she will use every honorable effect and make any sacrifice consistent with her honor and interest to restore and maintain it; but that it is proper to declare, through the Convention now assembled, her opposition to the coercion, under existing circumstances, of any slave State, and an unalterable dete
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
at was the prospect of meeting a brother Virginian in the hostile conflict of civil war. He (Mr. W.) could not aim at his heart, but would risk his life to disarm him. There is a power driving us from the Union. The seceded States are not dragging us, but the Black Republicans are driving us out. He would stand by the side of the gentleman from Rockbridge and help to drive them out. Mr. Moore.--Agreed. Mr. Wise.--Will he assist in driving out those who are now testing powder at Fortress Monroe to shoot down our own people? Will he assist in driving out from Gosport Navy Yard the army which will be stationed there to stray over into Princess Anne and rob hen roosts for provisions? [Laughter] It was best to come to an understanding. He implored the gentleman as a Union man not to aid in driving him out of the Union. His people would expect him to submit to no state of things that was dishonorable. If those resolutions would not keep the peace, he saw no means of preventing
t to this partial mode of proceeding. He protested against the right of a gentlemen to introduce a resolution for buncombe, and then indicate the course it shall take. Mr. Carlile had no objection to withdrawing the resolution. He had accomplished his object. Mr. Montague insisted that he could not withdraw it without the consent of the Convention. Mr. Carlile then said he had no objection to its reference to the Committee on Federal Relations, and it was so referred. Mr. Leake offered the following: Resolved, as the opinion of this Convention of the people of Virginia, That if the Federal Government at Washington should undertake, forcibly, to retake the forts within any of the States that have dissolved their connection with the Federal Union, Virginia will regard such acts as an invasion of the rights of sovereign States, and should said authorities undertake to collect the duties on foreign importations introduced, or about to be introduced, into any su
John Brown (search for this): article 1
is body, and would be compelled to neglect his duties there if he were to give the attention to this committee that its importance demanded. He was excused, and Mr. Baldwin, of Augusta, was appointed in his place. Mr. Clemens also asked to be excused from saving, on the ground of physical disability. The request was granted, and Mr. Jackson, of Wood, was appointed instead. The President announced the Committee on Elections as follows: Messrs. Haymond of Marion, Goggin of Bedford, Brown of Preston, Chambliss of Greensville and Sussex, Caperion of Monroe, Ambler of Louisa, Gray of Rockbridge, Hunton of Prince William, Campbell of Washington, Treadway of Pittsylvania, Hall of Lancaster, Sheffey of Smythe, and Patrick of Kanawha. The President submitted a package of election returns, which were referred to the appropriate committee. Resolutions. Mr. Sutheruin offered a resolution, which was adopted, admitting editors and reporters of newspapers generally, through
ees appointed. The Presidentannounced the following Committee on Federal Relations: Messrs. Conrad of Frederick, Stuart of Augusta, Wise at Princess Anne, Scott of Fauquier, Preston of Montgomery, Harvie of Amelia, Clemens of Ohio, Macfarland of Richmond City, McComic of Cabell, Montague of Matthews and Middlesex, Price of Greenbrier, Southall of Allenmarie, Willey of Monongalia, Bruce of Halifax. Boyd of Botetourt, Barbour of Culpeper, Williams of Shenandoah, Rives of Prince George and Surry, Moore of Rockbridge, Blow of Norfolk City, and Johnston of Lee and Scott. Mr. Stuart asked to be excused from service as he was a member of the Senate as well this body, and would be compelled to neglect his duties there if he were to give the attention to this committee that its importance demanded. He was excused, and Mr. Baldwin, of Augusta, was appointed in his place. Mr. Clemens also asked to be excused from saving, on the ground of physical disability. The request was gra
r of the Senate as well this body, and would be compelled to neglect his duties there if he were to give the attention to this committee that its importance demanded. He was excused, and Mr. Baldwin, of Augusta, was appointed in his place. Mr. Clemens also asked to be excused from saving, on the ground of physical disability. The request was granted, and Mr. Jackson, of Wood, was appointed instead. The President announced the Committee on Elections as follows: Messrs. Haymond of Marion, Goggin of Bedford, Brown of Preston, Chambliss of Greensville and Sussex, Caperion of Monroe, Ambler of Louisa, Gray of Rockbridge, Hunton of Prince William, Campbell of Washington, Treadway of Pittsylvania, Hall of Lancaster, Sheffey of Smythe, and Patrick of Kanawha. The President submitted a package of election returns, which were referred to the appropriate committee. Resolutions. Mr. Sutheruin offered a resolution, which was adopted, admitting editors and reporters of new
ny one in connection with the matter. Committees appointed. The Presidentannounced the following Committee on Federal Relations: Messrs. Conrad of Frederick, Stuart of Augusta, Wise at Princess Anne, Scott of Fauquier, Preston of Montgomery, Harvie of Amelia, Clemens of Ohio, Macfarland of Richmond City, McComic of Cabell, Montague of Matthews and Middlesex, Price of Greenbrier, Southall of Allenmarie, Willey of Monongalia, Bruce of Halifax. Boyd of Botetourt, Barbour of Culpeper, Williams of Shenandoah, Rives of Prince George and Surry, Moore of Rockbridge, Blow of Norfolk City, and Johnston of Lee and Scott. Mr. Stuart asked to be excused from service as he was a member of the Senate as well this body, and would be compelled to neglect his duties there if he were to give the attention to this committee that its importance demanded. He was excused, and Mr. Baldwin, of Augusta, was appointed in his place. Mr. Clemens also asked to be excused from saving, on the gr
igned to dispute unworthy motives to any one in connection with the matter. Committees appointed. The Presidentannounced the following Committee on Federal Relations: Messrs. Conrad of Frederick, Stuart of Augusta, Wise at Princess Anne, Scott of Fauquier, Preston of Montgomery, Harvie of Amelia, Clemens of Ohio, Macfarland of Richmond City, McComic of Cabell, Montague of Matthews and Middlesex, Price of Greenbrier, Southall of Allenmarie, Willey of Monongalia, Bruce of Halifax. Boyd of Botetourt, Barbour of Culpeper, Williams of Shenandoah, Rives of Prince George and Surry, Moore of Rockbridge, Blow of Norfolk City, and Johnston of Lee and Scott. Mr. Stuart asked to be excused from service as he was a member of the Senate as well this body, and would be compelled to neglect his duties there if he were to give the attention to this committee that its importance demanded. He was excused, and Mr. Baldwin, of Augusta, was appointed in his place. Mr. Clemens also as
forts, let them take the consequences. The resolutions were referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Carlile said he had heard much about coercion. Now, the President of the United States had expressly denied the right of coerpreme Court of the United States pronounced it null and void. Mr. Morris.--Who put the Wilmot Proviso there? Mr. Carlile.--A Southern President signed it, and a Democratic Congress passed it. He (Mr. C.) wanted gentlemen to enlighten us, ainst the right of a gentlemen to introduce a resolution for buncombe, and then indicate the course it shall take. Mr. Carlile had no objection to withdrawing the resolution. He had accomplished his object. Mr. Montague insisted that he could not withdraw it without the consent of the Convention. Mr. Carlile then said he had no objection to its reference to the Committee on Federal Relations, and it was so referred. Mr. Leake offered the following: Resolved, as the op
James Gray (search for this): article 1
to this committee that its importance demanded. He was excused, and Mr. Baldwin, of Augusta, was appointed in his place. Mr. Clemens also asked to be excused from saving, on the ground of physical disability. The request was granted, and Mr. Jackson, of Wood, was appointed instead. The President announced the Committee on Elections as follows: Messrs. Haymond of Marion, Goggin of Bedford, Brown of Preston, Chambliss of Greensville and Sussex, Caperion of Monroe, Ambler of Louisa, Gray of Rockbridge, Hunton of Prince William, Campbell of Washington, Treadway of Pittsylvania, Hall of Lancaster, Sheffey of Smythe, and Patrick of Kanawha. The President submitted a package of election returns, which were referred to the appropriate committee. Resolutions. Mr. Sutheruin offered a resolution, which was adopted, admitting editors and reporters of newspapers generally, throughout the State, to seats in the Hall, under the direction of the President. Mr.Turner off
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