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also asked to be excused from saving, on the ground of physical disability. The request was granted, and Mr. Jackson, of Wood, was appointed instead. The President announced the Committee on Elections as follows: Messrs. Haymond of Marion, Goggin of Bedford, Brown of Preston, Chambliss of Greensville and Sussex, Caperion of Monroe, Ambler of Louisa, Gray of Rockbridge, Hunton of Prince William, Campbell of Washington, Treadway of Pittsylvania, Hall of Lancaster, Sheffey of Smythe, and Patrick of Kanawha. The President submitted a package of election returns, which were referred to the appropriate committee. Resolutions. Mr. Sutheruin offered a resolution, which was adopted, admitting editors and reporters of newspapers generally, throughout the State, to seats in the Hall, under the direction of the President. Mr.Turner offered a resolution, which was adopted, tendering the grateful acknowledgments of the Convention to the Young Men's Caristian Association for
Reverdy Johnson (search for this): article 1
n must be preserved, and the demonstration a few moments ago was the most forcible argument that could be made, in favor of his resolution. Mr. Hall moved to lay the whole subject on the table. Negatived. The substitute was opposed by Mr. Johnson, and rejected by the Convention. Mr.Early's resolution then passed, Federal Relations. Mr.Mare offered the following: Resolved, That Virginia cherishes a devoted attachment to the Union of these States, under the Constitution f some measures of compromise between the North and the South may be adopted, which will restore peace, friendship and union to every section of our now distracted country. Referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. On motion of Mr. Johnson, of Richmond city, the Convention voted to employ an Assistant Doorkeeper, to be appointed by the President. A resolution, offered by Mr. Morton, for providing desks for the members, and for having the seats cushioned, was rejected.
lace. Mr. Clemens also asked to be excused from saving, on the ground of physical disability. The request was granted, and Mr. Jackson, of Wood, was appointed instead. The President announced the Committee on Elections as follows: Messrs. Haymond of Marion, Goggin of Bedford, Brown of Preston, Chambliss of Greensville and Sussex, Caperion of Monroe, Ambler of Louisa, Gray of Rockbridge, Hunton of Prince William, Campbell of Washington, Treadway of Pittsylvania, Hall of Lancaster, Sheffey of Smythe, and Patrick of Kanawha. The President submitted a package of election returns, which were referred to the appropriate committee. Resolutions. Mr. Sutheruin offered a resolution, which was adopted, admitting editors and reporters of newspapers generally, throughout the State, to seats in the Hall, under the direction of the President. Mr.Turner offered a resolution, which was adopted, tendering the grateful acknowledgments of the Convention to the Young Men's Ca
Macfarland (search for this): article 1
Committees appointed. The Presidentannounced the following Committee on Federal Relations: Messrs. Conrad of Frederick, Stuart of Augusta, Wise at Princess Anne, Scott of Fauquier, Preston of Montgomery, Harvie of Amelia, Clemens of Ohio, Macfarland of Richmond City, McComic of Cabell, Montague of Matthews and Middlesex, Price of Greenbrier, Southall of Allenmarie, Willey of Monongalia, Bruce of Halifax. Boyd of Botetourt, Barbour of Culpeper, Williams of Shenandoah, Rives of Prince Georgent. Mr.Turner offered a resolution, which was adopted, tendering the grateful acknowledgments of the Convention to the Young Men's Caristian Association for the invitation to visit their Library and Reading-Room during the session. Mr. Macfarland offered a resolution, which was adopted, tendering the grateful thanks of the Convention to Mrs. Martha Stanard for the portrait of Monroe, and to Mr. J. W. Davis for the pictures and statuary, with which they had been kind enough to adorn th
Senate. Mr. Stuart said that he had risen merely to do an act of justice to himself and those who were absent. He had never designed to dispute unworthy motives to any one in connection with the matter. Committees appointed. The Presidentannounced the following Committee on Federal Relations: Messrs. Conrad of Frederick, Stuart of Augusta, Wise at Princess Anne, Scott of Fauquier, Preston of Montgomery, Harvie of Amelia, Clemens of Ohio, Macfarland of Richmond City, McComic of Cabell, Montague of Matthews and Middlesex, Price of Greenbrier, Southall of Allenmarie, Willey of Monongalia, Bruce of Halifax. Boyd of Botetourt, Barbour of Culpeper, Williams of Shenandoah, Rives of Prince George and Surry, Moore of Rockbridge, Blow of Norfolk City, and Johnston of Lee and Scott. Mr. Stuart asked to be excused from service as he was a member of the Senate as well this body, and would be compelled to neglect his duties there if he were to give the attention to this committ
Montgomery (search for this): article 1
the other; and he (Mr. W never heard of the matter till he heard it mentioned in the Senate. Mr. Stuart said that he had risen merely to do an act of justice to himself and those who were absent. He had never designed to dispute unworthy motives to any one in connection with the matter. Committees appointed. The Presidentannounced the following Committee on Federal Relations: Messrs. Conrad of Frederick, Stuart of Augusta, Wise at Princess Anne, Scott of Fauquier, Preston of Montgomery, Harvie of Amelia, Clemens of Ohio, Macfarland of Richmond City, McComic of Cabell, Montague of Matthews and Middlesex, Price of Greenbrier, Southall of Allenmarie, Willey of Monongalia, Bruce of Halifax. Boyd of Botetourt, Barbour of Culpeper, Williams of Shenandoah, Rives of Prince George and Surry, Moore of Rockbridge, Blow of Norfolk City, and Johnston of Lee and Scott. Mr. Stuart asked to be excused from service as he was a member of the Senate as well this body, and would be c
on cannot be restored and preserved upon terms honorable to its component parts, it shall be divided. Referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Morton offered the following resolutions: 1. Resolved, That the people of Virginia, in Convention assembled, do solemnly declare that she will not submit to the s members; but if the efforts now being made for that purpose prove unavailing, she will not hesitate to unite herself with her sister States of the South. Mr. Morton addressed the Convention on the subjects embraced in his resolutions. The course suggested was necessary to the safety and honor of Virginia. He expressed an motion of Mr. Johnson, of Richmond city, the Convention voted to employ an Assistant Doorkeeper, to be appointed by the President. A resolution, offered by Mr. Morton, for providing desks for the members, and for having the seats cushioned, was rejected. A communication was read from the House of Delegates, embodying an
J. W. Davis (search for this): article 1
enerally, throughout the State, to seats in the Hall, under the direction of the President. Mr.Turner offered a resolution, which was adopted, tendering the grateful acknowledgments of the Convention to the Young Men's Caristian Association for the invitation to visit their Library and Reading-Room during the session. Mr. Macfarland offered a resolution, which was adopted, tendering the grateful thanks of the Convention to Mrs. Martha Stanard for the portrait of Monroe, and to Mr. J. W. Davis for the pictures and statuary, with which they had been kind enough to adorn the Hall. Tickets of admission. Mr. Early alluded to the probable rush for seats on Monday, and the impossibility of accommodating all who would wish to hear the Southern Commissioners. To prevent confusion on that day, he offered a resolution instructing the Sergeant-at-Arms to ascertain the number of persons that can be accommodated in the gallery and space set apart for gentlemen, and that the Secr
er by the Rev. Jas. A. Duncan, of the Broad street M. E. Church. Personal explanation. Mr. Stuart, of Augusta, desired to make a personal explanation. He alluded to the letter from Messrs, Ims recollection. Justice required him to say further that he had been intimately asserted with Mr. Stuart the whole winner, and that neither received information that was not mentioned to the other; and he (Mr. W never heard of the matter till he heard it mentioned in the Senate. Mr. Stuart said that he had risen merely to do an act of justice to himself and those who were absent. He had nevhe Presidentannounced the following Committee on Federal Relations: Messrs. Conrad of Frederick, Stuart of Augusta, Wise at Princess Anne, Scott of Fauquier, Preston of Montgomery, Harvie of Amelia, Corge and Surry, Moore of Rockbridge, Blow of Norfolk City, and Johnston of Lee and Scott. Mr. Stuart asked to be excused from service as he was a member of the Senate as well this body, and woul
Virginia State Convention.fourth day. Saturday, Feb. 16, 1861. The Convention was called to order at 12 o'clock by the President. Prayer by the Rev. Jas. A. Duncan, of the Broad street M. E. Church. Personal explanation. Mr. Stuart, of Augusta, desired to make a personal explanation. He alluded to the letter from Messrs, Imboden and Harman, read yesterday by Mr. Wise, and said he had since read it himself. The writers fell into the error, he thought, quite naturally, of supposing that he said he had positive information that there was a movement on foot to place Mr. Wise in the Gubernatorial chair. The information of which he spoke alluded solely to the fact that he, Mr. Wise had been telegraphed to. When they expressed their disbelief, he stated that he had information which he was satisfied was true, but that was in reference to the telegram, and not to the conspiracy or plot. He had no intention to intimate that the gentlemen did not write what they belie
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