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was carried in the affirmative. Messrs. Johnson, Macfarland and Randolph, of Richmond city, voted for the amendment. The resolution, as amended, was then adopted. So the Convention will meet at half-past 10 A. M., until further ordered. Mr. Armstrong moved that the hour for going into Committee of the Whole be changed to 11 o'clock. After some debate, the motion was withdrawn. Order of the day. The Convention then resolved itself into Committee of the Whole, (Mr. Southall, of Albemarle, in the Chair,) and proceeded to consider the report of the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Randolph, of Richmond city, said that he had secured the floor at the adjournment on yesterday, with the view of tendering it this morning to Mr. Holcombe, of Albemarle; but the sickness of that gentleman having prevented his attendance, he was compelled to offer himself as, he conceived, a most unworthy substitute. The question before the country, he proceeded to say, prese
Ben Franklin (search for this): article 1
may deem necessary and proper. Resolved, That the basis of representation in the two Houses of the General Assembly should be the same; therefore, be it further. Resolved, That a committee of twelve members, to be selected in equal numbers from the four great divisions of the State, be appointed to apportion representation in the Senate according to the number of the qualified voters in the Commonwealth, and that they report amendments of the 4th Article of the Constitution accordingly. Some discussion ensued upon a point of order, it being suggested that similar resolutions, previously offered by Messrs. Haymond, of Marion, and Turner, of Jackson, and laid upon the table. Mr. Slaughter, of Campbell, moved that the resolutions just offered be laid upon the table, and on this motion Mr. Willey demanded the yeas and nays; but without further action. On motion of Mr. Early, of Franklin, the Convention adjourned to meet again on Monday, at half-past 10 o'clock.
merously signed by his constituents, favoring an adjustment of the National difficulties and instructing him to vote on, the side of the Union. He went on to speak of his constituents as firmly devoted to the Union and Constitution, but denied that they were sub-missionists in any sense of the term. They believed that the existing difficulties might be adjusted on fair and honorable terms. The resolutions were, on his motion, laid upon the table. Anti-secession resolutions. Mr. Burley, of Marshall, offered a series of resolutions, asking that they might be laid upon the table, proposing to call them up at a suitable time. They are as follows: Resolved, That this Convention can see no reason for departing from the faith of our fathers and from the principles on which the Government of the United States was founded, and therefore, we declare in the name of our constituents, the people of Virginia, that the Constitution of the United States was, in the language of M
may deem necessary and proper. Resolved, That the basis of representation in the two Houses of the General Assembly should be the same; therefore, be it further. Resolved, That a committee of twelve members, to be selected in equal numbers from the four great divisions of the State, be appointed to apportion representation in the Senate according to the number of the qualified voters in the Commonwealth, and that they report amendments of the 4th Article of the Constitution accordingly. Some discussion ensued upon a point of order, it being suggested that similar resolutions, previously offered by Messrs. Haymond, of Marion, and Turner, of Jackson, and laid upon the table. Mr. Slaughter, of Campbell, moved that the resolutions just offered be laid upon the table, and on this motion Mr. Willey demanded the yeas and nays; but without further action. On motion of Mr. Early, of Franklin, the Convention adjourned to meet again on Monday, at half-past 10 o'clock.
Alexander R. Holladay (search for this): article 1
w one to him, and for the purpose of disabusing the minds of those who might suppose his opinions had undergone a change, he read from his address to his people when he was a candidate for a seat in the Convention. He went on to express the confident hope that the course which he indicated would tend to a reconstruction of the Union as it was designed by the fathers. The propositions were referred to the Committee of the Whole and ordered to be printed. Voice of the people. Mr. Holladay, of Norfolk county, presented a series of resolutions enveloped in the American flag, and numerously signed by his constituents, favoring an adjustment of the National difficulties and instructing him to vote on, the side of the Union. He went on to speak of his constituents as firmly devoted to the Union and Constitution, but denied that they were sub-missionists in any sense of the term. They believed that the existing difficulties might be adjusted on fair and honorable terms. T
A. G. Hall (search for this): article 1
of Hampshire, moved to amend by fixing the hour of 10 instead of 11. Mr. Patrick, of Kanawha, called the attention of the Chair to the fact that a similar resolution was laid upon the table a few days ago; whereupon the President said a motion to take up would be necessary. Mr. Sutherland then moved that the resolution alluded to be taken up, which was carried in the affirmative. A motion to amend by substituting the hour of 10 o'clock was voted down by a large majority. Mr. Hall, of Marion, moved to amend by substituting half-past 10 for 11 o'clock, and on this motion Mr. Armstrong demanded the yeas and nays. The roll was thereupon called, and the vote resulted — yeas 70, nays 46. So the question on the amendment was carried in the affirmative. Messrs. Johnson, Macfarland and Randolph, of Richmond city, voted for the amendment. The resolution, as amended, was then adopted. So the Convention will meet at half-past 10 A. M., until further ordered
Man William Johnson (search for this): article 1
then moved that the resolution alluded to be taken up, which was carried in the affirmative. A motion to amend by substituting the hour of 10 o'clock was voted down by a large majority. Mr. Hall, of Marion, moved to amend by substituting half-past 10 for 11 o'clock, and on this motion Mr. Armstrong demanded the yeas and nays. The roll was thereupon called, and the vote resulted — yeas 70, nays 46. So the question on the amendment was carried in the affirmative. Messrs. Johnson, Macfarland and Randolph, of Richmond city, voted for the amendment. The resolution, as amended, was then adopted. So the Convention will meet at half-past 10 A. M., until further ordered. Mr. Armstrong moved that the hour for going into Committee of the Whole be changed to 11 o'clock. After some debate, the motion was withdrawn. Order of the day. The Convention then resolved itself into Committee of the Whole, (Mr. Southall, of Albemarle, in the Chair,) and pro
Africanise Virginia (search for this): article 1
thus ffectually cutting off the trade between Virginia and the South. We were thus hermetically sealed; and by their homestead legislation, the Republicans hold out inducements to our citizens to emigrate, and it would tend eventually to Africanise Virginia, for they could not take their slave property with them to the Territories. With regard to the seventh section, he asked why it was, when professing to make the General Government pay for fugitive slaves, they dropped the language used byargued that productions commanded higher prices under a tariff merely for revenue, than under a high tariff for protection. Mr. Randolph's argument upon this point was logical and conclusive, showing that it would be the mercantile death of Virginia to cut loose from the Cotton States. He was proceeding to elaborate the subject, when, seeing that the speaker was somewhat exhausted, Mr. Morton, of Orange, moved that the committee rise, which was agreed to. The committee then rose, and
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): article 1
bjects of the general welfare of one entire section of the Union and thereby to entail, in that section, injury and oppression upon the people thereof, and upon their posterity forever. 3. And without determining at this time whether the State of Virginia will unite herself with any other State or association of States in any common Government, this Convention doth respectfully and earnestly request that the States of North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, Arkansas and Delaware will, as soon as possible, appoint Commissioners to meet Commissioners, to be appointed by this Convention, in the city of Lexington, in the State of Kentucky, on the last Wednesday in May next, to confer together and to propose a plan of constructing a Government to be formed by the said States, Virginia inclusive, and the Confederate States of America.-- Such plan of Government, however, to have no binding authority till the same shall be adopted and ratified by this Convention — And for
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): article 1
The second section, he said, had been most elaborately defended, and proceeded to reply to the arguments advanced by Mr. Summers on the partition of territory. The question was proposed to be transferred to the floor of the Senate, and whichever party holding the majority should so manage as to seduce a few votes to their side, would seize upon the whole of the territory. He contended that it furnished no guarantee to the South, while it would eventually bring in all the provinces of Kansas against us. The Republicans had all the power of patronage on their side, while we had nothing. The provision gives rise to corruption and compromise, and consequently a constant agitation of the slavery question. In the third section, on the question of taxation and representation, he found fresh grounds for agitation. The fourth section he passed by. The fifth section, instead of prohibiting the African slave trade, prohibited the foreign slave trade, thus ffectually cutting off the
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