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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 30, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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W. W. Ball (search for this): article 1
sed of carriages containing the Captains of the Zouave Regiment. The train conveying the remains left the depot about 2 o'clock for the North. Capture of Captain Ball's Cavalry. The same correspondent thus speaks of the manner in which the capture of forty of Captain Ball's Cavalry, of Fairfax, was effected: One ofCaptain Ball's Cavalry, of Fairfax, was effected: One of the most unexpected features of this morning's military adventures into Virginia was the capture of a company of four officers and thirty-six men, composed of F. F. V.'s, of Fairfax county, Virginia, who had been enrolled into a brilliant and dashing Cavalry corps. This secession company were early alarmed by the arrival of the athered chapeau for the simple felt. The captain was a man of fine physique and carriage.--His plume was still aloft, and spurs in place, and haversack marked "W. W. Ball." Telegraphic Dispatches. Mechanicsville, N. Y., May 24.--The assassination of Col. Ellsworth has caused in this, his native town, the utmost sorrow a
George H. West (search for this): article 1
n company were early alarmed by the arrival of the Government forces in Alexandria, and, mounting their horses, began a precipitate retreat, riding till they believed themselves far beyond the reach of pursuit. They were rejoiced to see troops advancing from the West, whom they supposed to be reinforcements in their aid. Rushing hastily forward, they found themselves surrounded by the Michigan volunteers, and surrendered without a blow. They were taken on board the steamer Baltimore, Capt. West, and conveyed as prisoners of war to the Navy-Yard. We found them gaily attired, with feathered chapeaus, apparently unconscious of the fate to which their treason naturally consigns them. Some of them were anxious to convince those with whom they conversed that their friends and relations, as well as their own unbiased sympathies, were on the side of the flag of our Union. They were a crestfallen troop indeed, for some had already doffed their feathered chapeau for the simple felt. Th
d the first intimation he had of it was seeing the telegraph operator weeping. Mr. Ellsworth's grief was indescribable on learning the sad news. He left, in company with his wife, for New York this evening, on the Francis Skiddy. All the flags in town are at half-mast. The sympathy expressed for his parents is universal. The Colonel was their only living son. About a year since his younger brother, a young man of much ability, died in Chicago. A great excitement was created by one Wallman, a Dutch pedlar, who thought his death was all right, and expressed sentiments favorable to the traitors. He was allowed by the citizens twenty minutes to leave town, and left, the band playing the Rogue's March, with orders to return no more. Pittsburg, Pa., May 24--Col. Ellsworth's death was received here with profound sorrow. All the flags in the city were at half-mast. Poughkeepsie, May 24.--Upon the report of the death of Col. Ellsworth the flags were lowered half-mast, and
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
ol. Ellsworth was James Jackson, keeper of the Marshall House. The name of the Zouave that shot Jackson is Brownell. He first blew his brains out with his rifle, and then bayonetted him. The body of Col. Ellsworth was brought over in charge of six Zouaves. The wildest grief is exhibited by the members of the regiment. Before wrapping the secession flag around his body Ellsworth had trampled it under foot. I called at the White House this morning, with Senator Wilson, of Massachusetts, to see the President on a pressing matter of public business, and as we entered the library we remarked the President standing before a window, looking out across the Potomac, running at foot of Presidential grounds. He did not move till we approached very closely, when he turned round abruptly, and advanced towards us, extending his hand: "Excuse me," he said, "but I cannot talk." We supposed that his voice had probably given way from some cause or other, and we were just about to inq
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): article 1
ns them. Some of them were anxious to convince those with whom they conversed that their friends and relations, as well as their own unbiased sympathies, were on the side of the flag of our Union. They were a crestfallen troop indeed, for some had already doffed their feathered chapeau for the simple felt. The captain was a man of fine physique and carriage.--His plume was still aloft, and spurs in place, and haversack marked "W. W. Ball." Telegraphic Dispatches. Mechanicsville, N. Y., May 24.--The assassination of Col. Ellsworth has caused in this, his native town, the utmost sorrow and indignation. The father of Colonel Ellsworth happened to be in the telegraph office when the melancholy intelligence was received, and the first intimation he had of it was seeing the telegraph operator weeping. Mr. Ellsworth's grief was indescribable on learning the sad news. He left, in company with his wife, for New York this evening, on the Francis Skiddy. All the flags in town ar
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
pringfield, before Mr. Lincoln's inauguration. He afterwards rendered great assistance in a clerical way. The President admired him for the wonderful energy. he displayed with his company of Chicago Zonaves, with which he made a tour of the United States. The President, on his visit to the Navy-Yard this afternoon, requested the guard of honor having in charge the remains of Col. Ellsworth, to allow them to be brought to the White House and have the funeral ceremonies there. This reques-mast to-day, out of respect to Col. E.'s memory. The firemen held a meeting at the Astor House this evening, to take action in reference to the deceased. Tomorrow ten thousand troops, embracing Gen. Dix's brigade, will be mustered into the United States service. The ceremony will take place in Fourteenth street. A letter from Washington to the Press says Mrs. Lincoln and her sister visited the Navy-Yard to-day, where the body of the deceased soldier was lying in state, and placed
Dedham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
f the Heights, seized a train of cars this afternoon, containing some three hundred passengers, a portion of whom are retained as prisoners. It is difficult to learn the particulars of the seizure of the train, and the disposition of the passengers and prisoners, inasmuch as the military authorities here refuse all passes to civilians to cross over to Virginia. This rule is applied to the members of the press with peculiar severity. Boston, May 23.--The Legislature was prorogued this afternoon by the Governor. There were fifteen bills and two resolves passed during the session, all of which had reference to the present condition of the State and country. Many of the members donated their pay to the Massachusetts Volunteer Fund, and the session closed by the members singing the "Star Spangled Banner," and other patriotic songs. The People's Convention at Dedham to-day unanimously nominated B. F. Thomas as successor to Mr. Adams, from the Third Congressional District.
Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 1
half-mast. The sympathy expressed for his parents is universal. The Colonel was their only living son. About a year since his younger brother, a young man of much ability, died in Chicago. A great excitement was created by one Wallman, a Dutch pedlar, who thought his death was all right, and expressed sentiments favorable to the traitors. He was allowed by the citizens twenty minutes to leave town, and left, the band playing the Rogue's March, with orders to return no more. Pittsburg, Pa., May 24--Col. Ellsworth's death was received here with profound sorrow. All the flags in the city were at half-mast. Poughkeepsie, May 24.--Upon the report of the death of Col. Ellsworth the flags were lowered half-mast, and the fire bells tolled. Washington, May 24.--A detachment of Col. Corcoran's Regiment, stationed on the southern slope of the Heights, seized a train of cars this afternoon, containing some three hundred passengers, a portion of whom are retained as prisone
Fairfax (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ntaining the Captains of the Zouave Regiment. The train conveying the remains left the depot about 2 o'clock for the North. Capture of Captain Ball's Cavalry. The same correspondent thus speaks of the manner in which the capture of forty of Captain Ball's Cavalry, of Fairfax, was effected: One of the most unexpected features of this morning's military adventures into Virginia was the capture of a company of four officers and thirty-six men, composed of F. F. V.'s, of Fairfax county, Virginia, who had been enrolled into a brilliant and dashing Cavalry corps. This secession company were early alarmed by the arrival of the Government forces in Alexandria, and, mounting their horses, began a precipitate retreat, riding till they believed themselves far beyond the reach of pursuit. They were rejoiced to see troops advancing from the West, whom they supposed to be reinforcements in their aid. Rushing hastily forward, they found themselves surrounded by the Michigan voluntee
Poughkeepsie (New York, United States) (search for this): article 1
brother, a young man of much ability, died in Chicago. A great excitement was created by one Wallman, a Dutch pedlar, who thought his death was all right, and expressed sentiments favorable to the traitors. He was allowed by the citizens twenty minutes to leave town, and left, the band playing the Rogue's March, with orders to return no more. Pittsburg, Pa., May 24--Col. Ellsworth's death was received here with profound sorrow. All the flags in the city were at half-mast. Poughkeepsie, May 24.--Upon the report of the death of Col. Ellsworth the flags were lowered half-mast, and the fire bells tolled. Washington, May 24.--A detachment of Col. Corcoran's Regiment, stationed on the southern slope of the Heights, seized a train of cars this afternoon, containing some three hundred passengers, a portion of whom are retained as prisoners. It is difficult to learn the particulars of the seizure of the train, and the disposition of the passengers and prisoners, inasmuch
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