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The National crisis. Mayor Wood's Recommendation--Senator Benjamin's late speech — War news from Charleston--Hon. Humphrey Marshall--movement of U. S. Troops--volunteering in South Carolina, &c., &c. the Republican papers are attempting to impugn the commercial honesty of the South. The figures, however, lay their arguments out. The following table, compiled from the circulars of the mercantile agency of Dun Boyd & Co., shows the number of failures in the free and slave States respectively in 1860. Free States.Slave States. Whole number of stores in 1860$162,832$66,990 Whole number of failures in 18602,633943 Liabilities of failed stores61,801,97415,103,271 Failed from lack of mercantile knowledgeIMLS_Dictionary.dic and capacity, fires without insurance, bad debts, trusting out, &c665204 Liabilities of foregoing12,047,7482,630,300 Failed from dissipation, extravagance, gambling, inattention to business, &c.21682 Liabilities of foregoing4,233,2311,2
ragoons, unmounted, reached here yesterday afternoon, at one o'clock, per Northern Central Railway, for the U. S. Cavalry Barracks, Carlisle, Pa., on route for Harper's Ferry, where they will remain subject to the orders of the Secretary of War. They numbered 64 men, including rank and file, and notwithstanding they are nearly all recruits, yet there are a number of experienced military men amongst them.--Lieut. Jones was in command, with Orderly Sergeant Wm. Kelly, and Sergeants McGee and O'Brien. They were accompanied by several buglers, but marched through the streets without music, and bore the impress of real soldiers. Blankets were folded in their knapsacks, and with the heavy overcoats strapped above, they looked like men ready for the practical operations of war. They left here in the 4 o'clock. Western train, and during their brief stay in the Monumental City were visited by a number of our military. Balt. American. Garrisoning Fort Washington. The Alexandria Gaz
this battalion has already two companies — over 200 men — in Charleston, it must be taken as the strongest evidence that the officers and men composing it are not merely holiday soldiers, but prepared — aye, eager — to be called into active service, in defence of their State. The two remaining companies from the upper and lower battalions were made up without difficulty. The first-named had more volunteers than were necessary, and the latter had already an efficient company, raised by Dr. Ray, besides those who volunteered on the field. Richland District has done her duty nobly. With a voting population of about one thousand five hundred, she has this day on duty, and waiting orders, not less than one thousand men. What district will beat her. Hoisting the United States flag at FortSumter. One of the men who recently returned from Fort Sumter details an incident that took place there on Major Anderson taking possession. It is known that the American flag, brought aw
rts that the Ordinance of Secession will be ready to be read and passed in Convention on Monday, the 7th inst. Our people here and elsewhere in the State are ripe for secession. The good faith with which the people of South Carolina have acted, and the perfidious act of the Federal authorities, has given additional strength to Florida to fight and win her battles." The Charleston Mercury since learned that a detachment of the Fernandina Volunteers has executed promptly the order of Governor Perry. "blue lights" in South Carolina. The Charleston Courier, of Monday, has the following paragraph: There is, or has been, some illicit communications between this city and Fort Sumter.--All interested will look out for blue lights or other irregular signals. The reported sailing of the Star of theWest with troops. The N. Y. Express, alluding to the report that the Star of the West from that port Sunday took 200 U. S. troops for Charleston, says: Our reporter
g for service: In conformity to orders from headquarters of the Commander-in-Chief, the 23d Regiment paraded on Saturday, for the purpose of raising three volunteer companies--one from the Independent Volunteer Battalion, and one each from the upper and lower battalions of the regiment. It speaks well for the patriotism of the District that this regimental parade was one of the largest we have seen.--After arriving on the field, the Governor's orders were read by Major Wood. Brigadier General Wallace then addressed the regiment, expressing his high gratification at the large turn-out. He spoke some time upon the existing state of affairs, but said that it required no urging upon the men before him to respond to the call of the Governor. At the close of his remarks he claimed the privilege of being enrolled as the first volunteer. He was followed by Col. Lorick, Maj. Wood and Adjutant Peck, who also enrolled their names. The order was given for volunteers to march four
Fernando Wood (search for this): article 1
The National crisis. Mayor Wood's Recommendation--Senator Benjamin's late speech — War news from Charleston--Hon. Humphrey Marshall--movement of U. S. Troopon, we find their amount at the North over four times that at the South. Mayor Wood on the secession of New York. Mayor Wood's message to the New York City CoMayor Wood's message to the New York City Council is published. He asserts that the political connection between the people of the city and State has been used by the latter to the injury of the former. He thch I have referred, and a consequent restoration of our corporate rights. Fernando Wood, Mayor. January 6, 1861. The speech of Senator Benjamin. A Washine have seen.--After arriving on the field, the Governor's orders were read by Major Wood. Brigadier General Wallace then addressed the regiment, expressing his high gge of being enrolled as the first volunteer. He was followed by Col. Lorick, Maj. Wood and Adjutant Peck, who also enrolled their names. The order was given f
een.--After arriving on the field, the Governor's orders were read by Major Wood. Brigadier General Wallace then addressed the regiment, expressing his high gratification at the large turn-out. He spoke some time upon the existing state of affairs, but said that it required no urging upon the men before him to respond to the call of the Governor. At the close of his remarks he claimed the privilege of being enrolled as the first volunteer. He was followed by Col. Lorick, Maj. Wood and Adjutant Peck, who also enrolled their names. The order was given for volunteers to march four paces to the front, and was responded to most handsomely. Capt. Casson promptly tendered his command of 120 men to the Colonel, and was accepted as the company from the Volunteer Battalion. Lieut. Brennan, commanding the Emmet Guards, whose whole command had also marched to the front, in some appropriate remarks, tendered his corps. The Richland Guards, Capt. E. F. Bookter, numbering 100 rifles, also
dly hastening to a fatal result. During Friday night, at intervals, it required several men to hold Mr. Toppan during the spasms, and in the morning it was found necessary to send to the police station for policemen, with manacles, to secure him to the bedstead, so violent were the contortions, to prevent him bruising himself, or doing injury to those around him. This disease, it is well known, induces the patient to bite, like a dog, and the bite, in most cases, would be dangerous. While in the spasms, during the night, he seemed endowed with the strength of a giant, but in the intervals of exhaustion between each, he was evidently growing weaker and weaker, and frequently fully sensible of his condition. At half-past 2 o'clock, on Sunday morning, Mr. Toppau died. Some two hours before his death his struggles ceased, and he appeared insensible to pain and the attentions which were bestowed upon him. His throat seemed filled with phlegm, like a person dying with consumption.
May, 1 AD (search for this): article 1
and servile race you can never make of us, never, never, never!" This reiteration of the word "never" was as free from emotion as if he had been insisting on some simple point of law, which could not be decided in any different way; but free from emotion as it was, it produced the greatest effect. The whole gallery on all sides burst out as in one voice, in uncontrollable applause. The Florida forts taken. The following is an extract from a letter, dated Fernandina, Florida, Jan. 5th: "An order came from the Governor this afternoon at three o'clock, and the Everglade will leave here at midnight for St. Augustine, to have the fort there taken, and to bring us some guns and small arms. "The messenger from the Government reports that the Ordinance of Secession will be ready to be read and passed in Convention on Monday, the 7th inst. Our people here and elsewhere in the State are ripe for secession. The good faith with which the people of South Carolina have ac
. Mayor Wood's Recommendation--Senator Benjamin's late speech — War news from Charleston--Hon. Humphrey Marshall--movement of U. S. Troops--volunteering in South Carolina, &c., &c. the Republican papers are attempting to impugn the commercial honesty of the South. The figures, however, lay their arguments out. The following table, compiled from the circulars of the mercantile agency of Dun Boyd & Co., shows the number of failures in the free and slave States respectively in 1860. Free States.Slave States. Whole number of stores in 1860$162,832$66,990 Whole number of failures in 18602,633943 Liabilities of failed stores61,801,97415,103,271 Failed from lack of mercantile knowledgeIMLS_Dictionary.dic and capacity, fires without insurance, bad debts, trusting out, &c665204 Liabilities of foregoing12,047,7482,630,300 Failed from dissipation, extravagance, gambling, inattention to business, &c.21682 Liabilities of foregoing4,233,2311,282,500 Failed from s
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