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t which left here on Wednesday arrived safely at Ironton yesterday. A battery of the 1st Missouri Light Artillery, under command of Maj. Schofield, started from this city yesterday, and probably reach Pilot Knob this morning. The rebels had not destroyed any more of the bridges. The Big river bridge is being rapidly rebuilt. From Cairo — return of Federal troops from a grand reconnaissance to Columbus. Cairo, Jan. 20. --(Special dispatch to the Chicago Journal.)--General Grant and his staff arrived in town yesterday morning.--General Paine's brigade reached Fort Jefferson on Saturday, and General McClernand's brigade will arrive to-morrow. The object of the expedition, it now appears, was a reconnaissance in force of all that part of Kentucky in which a portion of the operations against Columbus will necessarily be performed, and a demonstration to aid General Buell's right wing. Our forces have been eminently successful, and the engineer corps, under Co
John B. Henderson (search for this): article 16
ediately. There is no doubt, as it is a plain case, but that they will be sentenced to be shot. They may escape the death penalty through the intercession of Gen. Montgomery. U. S. Senator from Missouri. St. Louis, Jan. 20. --John B. Henderson has been appointed, by Lieut. Gov. Wall, U. S. Senator, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the expulsion of Truston Polk. Mr. Henderson is a Douglas Democrat, and an uncompressing Union man. He was a member of the State Convention, and a BrMr. Henderson is a Douglas Democrat, and an uncompressing Union man. He was a member of the State Convention, and a Brigadier General in the State service. Late from the Rio Grande — important movement of the Mexicans. The Houston Telegraph, of the 10th, contains the following important item: Our Brownsville correspondent gives unimportant piece of information regarding the movements across the Rio Grande. The sham fight at Matamoras is, of course, unworthy of further attention, but the approach of Vidaurri, with 7,000 men, to make his headquarters at Matamoras, as a representative of the Mexic
rect from Manassas, that the rebel forces have evacuated that point, falling back to a position further South. The object of this movement is supposed to be to counteract an apprehended movement of our troops from the seaboard. From Washington — Unconfirmed report--Hon. James Guthrie. Washington, Jan. 20. --The report that General Wool had sent a notification to Norfolk to remove the women and children out of that city is not confirmed by official intelligence. The Hon. Mr. Stanton, Secretary of War, entered upon his duties to-day. A large number of army officers, in full uniform, paid their respects to him. A letter has been received here from Hon. James Guthrie, the distinguished Secretary of the Treasury under Franklin Pierce's Administration, which generally sustains the financial view taken by Secretary Chase. It also approves of General McClellan's defensive position upon the Potomac; but he thinks that offensive operations by the Federal columns are th
ral Wool had sent a notification to Norfolk to remove the women and children out of that city is not confirmed by official intelligence. The Hon. Mr. Stanton, Secretary of War, entered upon his duties to-day. A large number of army officers, in full uniform, paid their respects to him. A letter has been received here from Hon. James Guthrie, the distinguished Secretary of the Treasury under Franklin Pierce's Administration, which generally sustains the financial view taken by Secretary Chase. It also approves of General McClellan's defensive position upon the Potomac; but he thinks that offensive operations by the Federal columns are the best plans for driving the rebels out of Kentucky. Gen. Buell is made the subject of high commendation. Gen. Sumner, commanding a division of the army in Virginia, who was recently injured by the stumbling of his horse, has sufficiently recovered to resume his duties during the coming week. The assault on Gen. Montgomery. Cap
until 3 o'clock in the afternoon, when, Zollicoffer having been killed, the whole force of rebels fled in confusion to their camp. The loss is not stated, but it is thought to be heavy. The Baillie Peyton, Jr., who is among the killed is a son at the distinguished ex-member of Congress of that name from Tennessee. Our victory is said to have been very decisive, and will result in the rout of the whole force defending the right flank of the rebel's position at Bowling Green. Gen. Ruell's division — a Brilliant victory at Somerset, Ky. Cincinnati Jan. 20. --A battle was fought at Somerset, Ky., on Saturday, between the Federal troops under Gen. Schoepff, and the rebels under General Zollicoffer. The engagement was commenced in the morning, and lasted till nightfall. Gen. Zollicoffer was killed, and his army entirely defeated. The loss is heavy on both sides. Second Dispatch — the Federal victory confirmed. Louisville, Jan. 20. --Gene
Truston Polk (search for this): article 16
cHenry, who committed the murderous assault on Gen. Montgomery, at Alexandria, on Saturday, are to be tried by court-martial immediately. There is no doubt, as it is a plain case, but that they will be sentenced to be shot. They may escape the death penalty through the intercession of Gen. Montgomery. U. S. Senator from Missouri. St. Louis, Jan. 20. --John B. Henderson has been appointed, by Lieut. Gov. Wall, U. S. Senator, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the expulsion of Truston Polk. Mr. Henderson is a Douglas Democrat, and an uncompressing Union man. He was a member of the State Convention, and a Brigadier General in the State service. Late from the Rio Grande — important movement of the Mexicans. The Houston Telegraph, of the 10th, contains the following important item: Our Brownsville correspondent gives unimportant piece of information regarding the movements across the Rio Grande. The sham fight at Matamoras is, of course, unworthy of further at
his transactions have been received. After having effected the destruction of the property at Rowlett's, he returned to Horse Cave, which, after having conveyed to another point the moveable property, was laid is ashes. Coming on down to Cave City, the people were notified of the doom that awaited them. The furniture and household chattels were taken charge of the torch applied, and soon all the buildings were a heap of smouldering ruins. It is reported to-day that Mammoth Cave hotel and Ritter's hotel and buildings, at Woodland, have also been burned; and it is asserted that every public house on the line of the railroad and the turnpike above the junction, within our lines, are to share the same fate. Gentlemen just from the scene of these destructive operations represent appearances as being desolate and painful in the extreme. Scarcely anything in the shape of articles of sustenance remain along the line of Hindman's march. He drove off quantities of live stock, and many
W. H. G. Smith (search for this): article 16
l necessarily be performed, and a demonstration to aid General Buell's right wing. Our forces have been eminently successful, and the engineer corps, under Col. Webster, have a full and accurate knowledge of the country. It is understood that Gen. Smith has taken the camp equipage and whatever was left in Camp Beauregard, the rebels having fled to Columbus. General McClernand's brigade went to within seven miles of Columbus, and encamped on Thursday night in eight of the rebel watch-fires. He afterwards visited the towns of Millburn, Lovelaceville, and Blandville, surveying all the roads as he went. A part of Gen. Smith's command will return to Paducah to-day. Reach sentiment at the North. Forney, in his letter to the Press, from Washington says: "Some of our public men do not hesitate to say that, rather than bring back the seceded States into the Union, they would agree to a peaceful and prompt separation," And again: "There is an active party in the
hase. It also approves of General McClellan's defensive position upon the Potomac; but he thinks that offensive operations by the Federal columns are the best plans for driving the rebels out of Kentucky. Gen. Buell is made the subject of high commendation. Gen. Sumner, commanding a division of the army in Virginia, who was recently injured by the stumbling of his horse, has sufficiently recovered to resume his duties during the coming week. The assault on Gen. Montgomery. Capt. Chapman and Lieut McHenry, who committed the murderous assault on Gen. Montgomery, at Alexandria, on Saturday, are to be tried by court-martial immediately. There is no doubt, as it is a plain case, but that they will be sentenced to be shot. They may escape the death penalty through the intercession of Gen. Montgomery. U. S. Senator from Missouri. St. Louis, Jan. 20. --John B. Henderson has been appointed, by Lieut. Gov. Wall, U. S. Senator, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the
Crittenden (search for this): article 16
he Feeling in Washington. Washington. Jan. 21. --The Government has received dispatches fully confirming the intelligence from Kentucky. The facts reported in the press dispatches are substantially correct. The news causes intense delight here. The position of the Federal troops. The position of the troops at Somerset, is thus described in a letter from there, dated January 15, which we clip from the Philadelphia Press, of the 21st. The status here is simply this: Crittenden having taken the command of the troops at Mill Spring, while Zollicoffer has gone to Nashville, remains with the bulk of his 12,000 men, entrenched, and defended by 11 pieces of field artillery, and some 20 of the cannon manufactured in the Confederacy, and warranted to burst on the third discharge. His right flank is protected by the river, his left by White Oak Creek, (a stream with high bluff banks, impassable at the camp to our troops,) while his front rests on a succession of hills,
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