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Somerset, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) 20 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 24, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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John D. Thomas (search for this): article 16
cinnati, Jan. 20. --A combined attach was made to-day on Gen. Zollicoffer's entrenchments, by Gen. Schoepff and General Thomas, resulting in a complete victory. The Stars and Stripes how wave over the rebel fortifications. Our troops loss is heavy on both sides. Second Dispatch — the Federal victory confirmed. Louisville, Jan. 20. --General Thomas telegraphs to headquarters that, on Friday night, General Zollicoffer came up to his encampment, and attacked him at er side. Louisville, Jan. 20. --The recent fight took place on Sunday, instead of Saturday morning. Gen. Thomas, on Sunday morning, followed up the rebels to their entrenchments, sixteen miles from his own camp, and was about to ation. On our part, General Boyle is somewhere on the Cumberland river, near Burkesville, waiting for artillery. General Thomas is fifteen sides this side of Columbia, or was at last accounts, waiting till a creek runs down, and we are here wait
Confederates Evacuating their position. Washington, Jan. 20. --Information has been received from parties direct from Manassas, that the rebel forces have evacuated that point, falling back to a position further South. The object of this movement is supposed to be to counteract an apprehended movement of our troops from the seaboard. From Washington — Unconfirmed report--Hon. James Guthrie. Washington, Jan. 20. --The report that General Wool had sent a notification to Norfolk to remove the women and children out of that city is not confirmed by official intelligence. The Hon. Mr. Stanton, Secretary of War, entered upon his duties to-day. A large number of army officers, in full uniform, paid their respects to him. A letter has been received here from Hon. James Guthrie, the distinguished Secretary of the Treasury under Franklin Pierce's Administration, which generally sustains the financial view taken by Secretary Chase. It also approves of General M
Bailie Peyton (search for this): article 16
hat, on Friday night, General Zollicoffer came up to his encampment, and attacked him at six o'clock on Saturday morning, near Webb's Crossroads, in the vicinity of Somerset. At half-past 3 o'clock, on Saturday afternoon, Zollicoffer and Bailie Peyton had been killed, and the rebels were in full retreat to their entrenchments, at Mill Springs. The Federal troops were in hot pursuit. No further particulars have been received, nor any account of the losses on either side. Louisebels, in dispersing, had crossed the Cumberland river in a steamboat and nine barges, at White Oak creek, opposite their encampment at Mill Spring. Two hundred and seventy-five (275) rebels were killed and wounded, including Zollicoffer and Peyton. The dead were found on the field. The Tenth Indiana Regiment lost 75 killed and wounded. No further particulars of the Federal loss have yet reached here. The scene of the victory. The scene of the late victory is Somerset, the ca
Franklin Pierce (search for this): article 16
nfirmed report--Hon. James Guthrie. Washington, Jan. 20. --The report that General Wool had sent a notification to Norfolk to remove the women and children out of that city is not confirmed by official intelligence. The Hon. Mr. Stanton, Secretary of War, entered upon his duties to-day. A large number of army officers, in full uniform, paid their respects to him. A letter has been received here from Hon. James Guthrie, the distinguished Secretary of the Treasury under Franklin Pierce's Administration, which generally sustains the financial view taken by Secretary Chase. It also approves of General McClellan's defensive position upon the Potomac; but he thinks that offensive operations by the Federal columns are the best plans for driving the rebels out of Kentucky. Gen. Buell is made the subject of high commendation. Gen. Sumner, commanding a division of the army in Virginia, who was recently injured by the stumbling of his horse, has sufficiently recovered to
Felix K. Zollicoffer (search for this): article 16
renchments attacked and forced — death of Gen. Zollicoffer. Cincinnati, Jan. 20. --A comers. The loss of the rebels is heavy. Zollicoffer's dead body is in the possession of the Fednt of the battle fought on Saturday: Gen. Zollicoffer, learning that the Federal forces had appury until 3 o'clock in the afternoon, when, Zollicoffer having been killed, the whole force of rebeder Gen. Schoepff, and the rebels under General Zollicoffer. The engagement was commenced in thalf-past 3 o'clock, on Saturday afternoon, Zollicoffer and Bailie Peyton had been killed, and the ) rebels were killed and wounded, including Zollicoffer and Peyton. The dead were found on the fiecommand of the troops at Mill Spring, while Zollicoffer has gone to Nashville, remains with the bulaiting for insulators. The late Gen. Felix K. Zollicoffer. From the Philadelphia Press, ofst inst., we extract the following: Gen. Zollicoffer was well known to the public as a politic[4 more...]
d no boats with which to go out and bring in the prize, but had sent off to another quarter for small boats. We have not learned any further tidings except that the crew of the transport were taken on board of a tug, which feared an attempt at rescuing the transport. There is evidently much feeling abroad at the escape of the war-ship Pensacola from our batteries on her passage down from Washington. It is reported, but we have been unable to trace it to a reliable source, that Gen. Johnston either has or intends to change the command and force at one or more of the Upper Potomac Batteries. There are also reports about court- martials, &c., but, as before remarked, it may all be idle rumor. Operations of Gen. Hindman in Kentucky. The Bowling Green correspondence of the Nashville Banner, writing under its recent date, furnishes the following interesting intelligence of the operations of Gen. Hindman's forces: In my last, mention was made of the burning of Cav
s, to the number of about 20,000, were advancing upon Paris and Danville, Tenn., and had already passed Farmington, Ky., on their way to the points designated. Farmington is in the vicinity of Paducah. When our informant passed Danville and Paris great excitement prevailed, and the Federals were hourly expected. It is supposed that the 20,000 here spoken of constitute a part of the immense force which lately left Cairo for Tennessee river, the remainder having probably been detailed to look after Forts Henry and Donelson which at last accounts, were still in the quiet possession of our troops, who, confident of success, anxiously a wait the approach of the enemy. If the Federal should reach Danville and Paris, they will undoubtedly seek to destroy the railroad and telegraphic lines, and thus out off communication between Memphis and Bowling Green. A few days — perhaps a few hours — may bring startling intelligence. Reported Federal victory in Kentucky--the Conf
James Guthrie (search for this): article 16
bel forces have evacuated that point, falling back to a position further South. The object of this movement is supposed to be to counteract an apprehended movement of our troops from the seaboard. From Washington — Unconfirmed report--Hon. James Guthrie. Washington, Jan. 20. --The report that General Wool had sent a notification to Norfolk to remove the women and children out of that city is not confirmed by official intelligence. The Hon. Mr. Stanton, Secretary of War, entered upon his duties to-day. A large number of army officers, in full uniform, paid their respects to him. A letter has been received here from Hon. James Guthrie, the distinguished Secretary of the Treasury under Franklin Pierce's Administration, which generally sustains the financial view taken by Secretary Chase. It also approves of General McClellan's defensive position upon the Potomac; but he thinks that offensive operations by the Federal columns are the best plans for driving the reb
Jeff Thompson (search for this): article 16
e Banner, using his position as a stepping stone to a membership in the Federal Congress. That position he finally attained in 1853, and continued for three sucsuccessive terms to hold it. Affairs in Missouri--reported battle near Ironton — success of the Confederates. The St. Louis Democrat, of January 17, says: Information of a reliable character reached this city last night to the effect that, yesterday, a large body of rebels, numbering about 5,000 men, in command of Jeff Thompson, advanced upon a Federal detachment of 300 troops, under Col. Mills, at a distance of about twenty-three miles from Ironton, and gave them battle. A desperate conflict ensued, resulting in the loss of many killed and wounded on both sides. The Federals, overpowered by numbers, had, at latest accounts, fallen back a distance of eight miles, leaving a quantity of baggage in the hands of the enemy, and were still retreating towards Pilot Knob. At Pilot Knob considerable alarm
on a Federal detachment of 300 troops, under Col. Mills, at a distance of about twenty-three miles from Ironton, and gave them battle. A desperate conflict ensued, resulting in the loss of many killed and wounded on both sides. The Federals, overpowered by numbers, had, at latest accounts, fallen back a distance of eight miles, leaving a quantity of baggage in the hands of the enemy, and were still retreating towards Pilot Knob. At Pilot Knob considerable alarm existed, and Col. Carlin was making every preparation for the impending struggle at that point. An attack was thought to be inevitable last night, but will not probably take place until to- day. The Wisconsin regiment which left here on Wednesday arrived safely at Ironton yesterday. A battery of the 1st Missouri Light Artillery, under command of Maj. Schofield, started from this city yesterday, and probably reach Pilot Knob this morning. The rebels had not destroyed any more of the bridges.
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