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Vincent Paul (search for this): article 6
in the Crimea and in Italy would have been better applied towards a descent upon England. M. Billault regretted the remarks of M de Boissy. Language of that description between two great nations, equally proud, equally sensitive upon the point of honor, was a misfortune. He thought it useless to revive French animosity towards England, when the policy of the Emperor tended, on the contrary, to appease such feelings. M. M. Shayer and Charles Dupin spoke in favor of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. The debate was adjourned. On the 25th the discussion was continued. Prince Napoleon protested against the expressions used by M. de Boissy. He said:--"In the Senate the standard of the younger branch has been raised in opposition to that of the older branch. I protested last year against similar insinuations. I now repeat that I wish to defend the constitutional and liberl empire. That empire can endure liberty, but liberty must take its course in the order established by ou
ommunications took place which led to a request that Sir Robert Peel-would name a friend, At his (Palmerston's) request he was that friend, but not, of course, with the design of arranging a hostile meeting. He was subesquently called upon by Major Gavin, the friend of the O'Donoghue, and explained to that gentleman that a breach of the privileges of the House could not be permitted, and that it was his intention to state the facts to the House and leave the question in its hands. The Speaker called upon the O'Donoghue to express his regret for what had occurred, Major Gavin explained his part in the transaction, and said that Sir Robert Peel had refused to retract anything that he had stated. The cause of offence was Sir Robert's allusion to the late meeting in the Rotunda at Dublin — got up by "Mannakin traitors," and to which no one of respectability responded. The O'Donoghue, after some little pressure from the Speaker, made the required apology to the House; but in d
Dragenfeld (search for this): article 6
commissioners named by the Queen, for the sole and separate use of the Princess. The Grand Duke of Hesse engages, by the eighth article, to secure to her Royal Highness, in the event of the death of his son, a jointure, together with a residence at Darmstadt, and the interest of her marriage portion. Should her Royal Highness become Grand Duchess of Hesse, she is to receive the same allowance that former Grand Duchesses have enjoyed. Letters from Vienna mention that the nephew of Count Dragenfeld, Minister of War, had been devoured by wolves. He was returning from hanting in a sledge, when he was attacked by two of these animals; he fired on them, and the coachman put his horse to a gallop to escape, but in doing so precipitated the Count from the sledge.--The coachman was not aware of the accident for some time, and on returning found only the mutilated body of the Count. The legal journal Le Droit, in reporting the sulcide of a gentleman in the Rue de Provence, without a
Stoneleigh Abbey (search for this): article 6
rince Joseph Bonaparte, his elterege, M. Renazzi, has just been arrested by order of the Pontifical Government All that is known further is, that the arrest is due to political causes." Mr. Latimer Clarke, the engineer for the Red Sea cable, has tested the cable at Suez, and finds the insulation perfect for one hundred and fifty miles. The arrangements for opening the Jubal station are progressing satisfactorily, and the Pasha has given his cordial co-operation. Lord Leigh, of Stoneleigh Abbey, is appealing to the public for the distressed operatives of Coventry. His lordship says there are twenty-five thousand people there out of employment, and a committee has been formed to assist some of them to emigrate. The Vienna papers mention a handsome donation made by the Prince of Wales for the benefit of the sufferest by the innadations and unusually severe weather, which latter has greatly aggravated the misery of thousands of poor houseless wretches, driven by the waters
seen the crime committed and denounced them, and the money was found upon them, with other proof of their guilt. Mrs. Bradshaw, the once eminent vocalist, known to the eider generation of playgoers as Miss. M. Tree, died on the 17th. In the ols ago, she was frequently associated with Miss Stephens Her retirement from the stage, consequent on her marriage with Mr. Bradshaw, occurred so long since that to modern amateurs of music she will seem to belong to a remote past, and to exist only in honorable tradition. Thirteen years have elapsed since the death of Mr. Bradshaw, and she has left one child, a daughter, who is married to Mr. Langley, formerly of the Second Guards.--Mrs. Bradshaw was the eldest sister of Mrs. Charles Kean. Mrs. Bradshaw was the eldest sister of Mrs. Charles Kean. On the 14th, Mrs Hudson, the wife of Mr. Hudson, a shopkeepet at Burythorpe, was at Mr. Waton's farm, at Birsdall, near Malton, where a corn-threshing machine was in use. Mrs. Hudson attempted to step over the "tumbling shaft," which revolves rapid
Schlosser (search for this): article 6
, who are engaged in plonghing a large tract of land along the coast; and if this continues the Island of Caprera will be soon completely transformed. The General constantly receives addresses and presents from his friends. He passes his evenings in reading the journals. The Vlenna journals announce the death in that city of aliterary veteran, ignatlus Casteill, born on the 6th of May, 1771, and consequently, 91 years of age. He wrote the text of the "Swiss family," set to music by Schlosser, and performed in Paris with French words in 1825. He was also the translator of numerous operatic and dramatic places.--Casteill has written his own epitaph, as follows: "Here lies a man who was ever devoted to art and honor. He was not of much importance when alive, and low he is nothing at all." He had a mania for collecting snuffboxes, and has left not fewer than 1,800. The Journal du Cher states that a painful accident occurred two nights since at the theatre of Bourges, during
sses have enjoyed. Letters from Vienna mention that the nephew of Count Dragenfeld, Minister of War, had been devoured by wolves. He was returning from hanting in a sledge, when he was attacked by two of these animals; he fired on them, and the coachman put his horse to a gallop to escape, but in doing so precipitated the Count from the sledge.--The coachman was not aware of the accident for some time, and on returning found only the mutilated body of the Count. The legal journal Le Droit, in reporting the sulcide of a gentleman in the Rue de Provence, without any known reason, states that his immediate predecessor in the apartment, and the occupier before him, both-laid violent hands upon themselves, and upon the strength of these curious facts broaches the theory that suicide is often attributable to mysterious local influences. In support of the doctrine if is said that Nepoleon I. ordered the destruction of a sentry-box, in which several soldiers had successively destro
eel, had used expressions which "the O'Donoghue" had considered personally offensive and insuiting to himself. The O'Donoghue took no notices of the expressions at the time, but he (Palmerston) was given to understand that results out of the House might ensue. As this would involve a breach of privilege, he wrote a letter to Sir Robert Peel, warning him of the impending trouble, and cautioning him against making himself a party to the breach of privilege. In the course of Saturday, the 22d, communications took place which led to a request that Sir Robert Peel-would name a friend, At his (Palmerston's) request he was that friend, but not, of course, with the design of arranging a hostile meeting. He was subesquently called upon by Major Gavin, the friend of the O'Donoghue, and explained to that gentleman that a breach of the privileges of the House could not be permitted, and that it was his intention to state the facts to the House and leave the question in its hands. The
et introduced the Navy estimates and entered at length into the position of naval affairs. After some debate a vote of seventy-six thousand men and the required sum for their wages and maintenance was agreed to. In the House of Lords, on the 25th, the Karl of Derby gave notice that he should on Thursday put a question to the Secretary of Foreign Affairs with regard to a proclamation of a most extraordinary character, which had been published in the Neapolitan papers. The proclamation sitsrevive French animosity towards England, when the policy of the Emperor tended, on the contrary, to appease such feelings. M. M. Shayer and Charles Dupin spoke in favor of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. The debate was adjourned. On the 25th the discussion was continued. Prince Napoleon protested against the expressions used by M. de Boissy. He said:--"In the Senate the standard of the younger branch has been raised in opposition to that of the older branch. I protested last year a
effect: "The captain of the Sumtes has been arrested at Tangler, at the instance of the American Consul at Gibraltar and of the commander of the Tuscarora, who sent to Tangter for that purpose" This news may be received with distrust. The proceedings in the British Partiament, briefly noticed by telegraph, have reached us more in detall. We copy an account of the episode in the House of Commons on the 25th of February: Lord Palmerston stated that, during the debate on the 21st ultimo, the Secretary for Ireland, Sir Robert Peel, had used expressions which "the O'Donoghue" had considered personally offensive and insuiting to himself. The O'Donoghue took no notices of the expressions at the time, but he (Palmerston) was given to understand that results out of the House might ensue. As this would involve a breach of privilege, he wrote a letter to Sir Robert Peel, warning him of the impending trouble, and cautioning him against making himself a party to the breach of pr
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