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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 28, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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Franklin S. Wolford (search for this): article 1
e next, and court the hazard the once so dreaded. This courage, as it is styled, is little more with most men than custom; and they learn to despise what has often threatened without causing them harm. If wounded, they learn wounds are less painful to bear than they had supposed; and then the doctrine of probabilities teaches them once more they are less liable to be wounded again. So the mental process goes on until the nerves become by degrees the subject of will, and he only fears who has not the will to be brave. A Kentucky Colonel killed. The Louisville Journal (Federal) says: We have painful rumors that Col. Franklin S. Wolford, of the First Kentucky cavalry, is dead, from the effects of the wound received in Monday's encounter with Morgan's marauders at Lebanon, Tenn. Our intelligence is that he died on Tuesday night, but as the Nashville papers of Wednesday and yesterday do not make any mention of the fact we shall hope that the reports are premature.
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): article 1
community. A Kansas Jayhawker and the Germans of St. Louis. A notorious Jayhawker, known as Colonel Jennison, of Kansas, who holds a commission in the Federal army, was lately under arrest for disobedience of orders. After his release he maGerman citizens assembled on Saturday evening to the number of 2,000 or 3,000, at Barnum's, to serenade Col. Jennison, of Kansas. They were accompanied by Kent's band, which played appropriate airs. Enthusiastic cheering greeted the appearance of C to quarrel, but ye remember that both God and man hated a coward. He had remembered it, as probably the history of Southern Kansas will show. In '57 he was ordered to leave by the pro-slavery hounds. --He was told it was because he was a free Stao be slave. He then told them that he had a Sharpe's rifle and two revolvers, and he proposed to "paddle his own canoe." Kansas tells who had succeeded in clearing the rapids. [Enthusiastic cheers.] In conclusion, the Colonel paid an eloquent tribu
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
of that city. It shows the brutal spirit of the man, while it plainly reveals the status of the party who have been laboring to crush out Southern sentiment in Missouri. Our German citizens assembled on Saturday evening to the number of 2,000 or 3,000, at Barnum's, to serenade Col. Jennison, of Kansas. They were accompanienumbers, at any time, but he refused. What was left? Why, we burnt them out. Was it not right? The Colonel then gave a rapid sketch of his campaign in Western Missouri, which justified his course, and demanding an investigation and justice at the hands of his defamers, he then alluded to the instigators of his arrest, stati own canoe." Kansas tells who had succeeded in clearing the rapids. [Enthusiastic cheers.] In conclusion, the Colonel paid an eloquent tribute to the Germans of Missouri, whose valor, patriotism, and devotion to liberty, had undoubtedly saved the State. He paid a tribute to Gen. Siegel, and in closing stated that with the German
Milton (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
allenged investigation. For these malignant slanders, he branded their authors as cowardly and contemptible liars and scoundrels. [Cheers] He had not even obeyed fully the orders he received. Had he done so, Pleasant Hill, Independence, Kansas City, and Westport, would have been in ashes. If these acts were criminal, then his superior officers were to be charged, not himself. We were fighting not an organized force, but a sneaking crowd of murderers, who did not dare to meet them in thWestport, would have been in ashes. If these acts were criminal, then his superior officers were to be charged, not himself. We were fighting not an organized force, but a sneaking crowd of murderers, who did not dare to meet them in the open field. He offered to fight Up. Hays, with equal numbers, at any time, but he refused. What was left? Why, we burnt them out. Was it not right? The Colonel then gave a rapid sketch of his campaign in Western Missouri, which justified his course, and demanding an investigation and justice at the hands of his defamers, he then alluded to the instigators of his arrest, stating that he had just received letters from them, in which they backed down, and declared that Gen. Sturgis would
Franklin Mills, Portage County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 1
s lately under arrest for disobedience of orders. After his release he made a speech to the Germans of St. Louis, a report of which we find in one of the papers of that city. It shows the brutal spirit of the man, while it plainly reveals the status of the party who have been laboring to crush out Southern sentiment in Missouri. Our German citizens assembled on Saturday evening to the number of 2,000 or 3,000, at Barnum's, to serenade Col. Jennison, of Kansas. They were accompanied by Kent's band, which played appropriate airs. Enthusiastic cheering greeted the appearance of Col. Jennison, who was introduced by Chas. P. Johnson, Esq., a member of the Committee of Arrangements. Col. Jennison, in response to the greeting, returned his thanks to the freedom-loving citizens of St. Louis, more especially the Germans, for the honor they had paid him, which, he was aware, was not to him personally, but to the principles he represented. He found himself in an embarrassing positi
New York Canal (Idaho, United States) (search for this): article 1
now shut up on the Lakes would have been at the disposal of the Government"--overlooking the fact that if patriotism and railroads have not carried them to Cairo and to the Atlantic coast, a ship canal would hardly have done so. We have heard in our day of a great many sailor peculiarities, but never until now have we heard it alleged that they cannot get from Chicago or Buffalo to Cairo, New York, or Philadelphia, upon railroads as other people do, but can only go upon the Illinois and New York canals, and not then unless the locks are enlarged! The West should learn to depend upon itself, as we have done. We have built our railroads and canals without help from the Treasury, while our public lands have been lavished upon every railroad scheme that speculators could bolster up in the neighborhood of the Mississippi. During our recent exuberant prosperity we have borne this without grumbling, but the limit of endurance is reached when a new and illimitable programme of plunder
Cairo, Greene county (New York, United States) (search for this): article 1
nt of Mr. Arnold, that if such a canal as he proposes had been in existence, the "fifteen thousand sailors now shut up on the Lakes would have been at the disposal of the Government"--overlooking the fact that if patriotism and railroads have not carried them to Cairo and to the Atlantic coast, a ship canal would hardly have done so. We have heard in our day of a great many sailor peculiarities, but never until now have we heard it alleged that they cannot get from Chicago or Buffalo to Cairo, New York, or Philadelphia, upon railroads as other people do, but can only go upon the Illinois and New York canals, and not then unless the locks are enlarged! The West should learn to depend upon itself, as we have done. We have built our railroads and canals without help from the Treasury, while our public lands have been lavished upon every railroad scheme that speculators could bolster up in the neighborhood of the Mississippi. During our recent exuberant prosperity we have borne thi
Lebanon (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
e next, and court the hazard the once so dreaded. This courage, as it is styled, is little more with most men than custom; and they learn to despise what has often threatened without causing them harm. If wounded, they learn wounds are less painful to bear than they had supposed; and then the doctrine of probabilities teaches them once more they are less liable to be wounded again. So the mental process goes on until the nerves become by degrees the subject of will, and he only fears who has not the will to be brave. A Kentucky Colonel killed. The Louisville Journal (Federal) says: We have painful rumors that Col. Franklin S. Wolford, of the First Kentucky cavalry, is dead, from the effects of the wound received in Monday's encounter with Morgan's marauders at Lebanon, Tenn. Our intelligence is that he died on Tuesday night, but as the Nashville papers of Wednesday and yesterday do not make any mention of the fact we shall hope that the reports are premature.
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
artment to make an arrangement for their immediate exchange, that they may rejoin their several regiments. He himself will at once go forward to the seat of war. The killing of Hon. Roberto Scott--the Yankee version of the affair. In the Yankee House of Representatives a communication had been received from the Secretary of War, in answer to a resolution, enclosing a report from Gen. Geary in tion to the murder of the Hon. Robert E. Scott and Mr. Matthews, who were killed between Warrenton and Salem, Va., A Northern paper gives the following summary of the report: The report states that an armed party, headed by Mr. Scott and a Mr. Matthews, went to arrest two soldiers of the 7th Wisconsin regiment, who were reported to be marauding in the neighborhood, and on their attempting to enter the farm-house in which the soldiers were, they were resisted, and in the affray Messrs. Scott and Matthews were killed, and one of the soldiers wounded — the other making his escape. Th
Splendid Strategy. The operations of General Jackson, which resulted in the capture of Winchester, formed a series of movements and combinations which have not been surpassed since the days of Napoleon. Jackson was at Woodstock. Banks, with his main body, was at Strasburg, where he was strongly entrenching himself. He bed a strong detachment at Front Royal Jackson made a demonstration against Strasburg with 5,000 men, who advanced half way to that point from Weekstock. With the rest of his army he suddenly turned to his right, fell upon the enemy at Front Royal, utterly routed him, and took, two regiments. Banks, at Strasburg, hearing the firing, stampeded for Winchester. Jackson, however; was too quick for him. He immediately act out from Front Royal, suspecting what would happen, to cut Banks off from Winchester. The parties met at the junction of the roads at Stephensburg. Jackson out the column in two Part fled to Winchester and part returned towards Strasburg. Jacks
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