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perusal, not alone for the clearness of the views and the force of the arguments advanced, but because of the very probable inspiration of the article itself. Our Paris contemporary writes in view of the preparations, at Corinth and Richmond, for two great battles. Nothing, he believes — and no doubt truly — can prevent the occurnts by force of arms. I believe the French Government is capable of proposing this project; but I cannot for a moment suppose it will be accepted in England. Paris papers state that the approaching visit of Count Persigny to London is exclusively political, and, according to the Esprit Public, he will submit to the English Cathe death of the Grand Duchess of Hesse. The Pacha of Egypt continued in London, and had been visited by the Lord Chamberlain on the part of Her Majesty. Paris letters say that a telegram dated Brussels, the night of the 14th of June, holds out little hope of the King of Belgium's recovery. The Turks, after having ta
Picayune Butler (search for this): article 2
y to the most vital interest to commercial Europe, but also to the most sensible minds that represent the interests of America. Let us remember that President Lincoln had pronounced himself in the same sense as, before him, Generals Burnside and Butler did, against an excitement to a slave war, and that in his last proclamation he called to mind his special message, quoting the following resolution, adopted by large majorities by both Houses of Congress: "The United States must co-operate oubtedly to stand aloof. The London Herald, in strong terms, asks, "how long is America to be indulged and Europe to en on the insurmountable difficulties of the North, it contends that separation is the only basis for peace. It denounces Gen. Butler and his proclamation in the strongest terms, and says it is enough to enlist universal sympathy for the South. The Manchester Guardian contends that the time for England to interfere has not yet come, if indeed it ever will, and attaches
Charles Arthur Beauregard (search for this): article 2
rmies to occupy such an extent, and where is the moral strength which could dispense with occupying them and hold the place of soldiers? We simply wish to touch upon facts — nothing but facts. What do we see on the side of the Confederates? They burn their produce; they burn their provisions; they destroy their railways; they blow up their dockyards, their arsenals, and their ships; they leave their wives and children to fight in battle. When in a proclamation of savage energy, General Beauregard recommends the planters to destroy their crops which are within reach of the enemy, and to apply the torch to them without delay or hesitation, it is not simply a captain excited by the drunkenness of war who speaks — it is the general sentiment loudly expressed. Had not numerous meetings already expressed their opinion? Once, again, let us observe, we do not wish to express our own ideas on such acts; we simply wish to give facts. On the other hand, what are the Federals doing?
St Thomas (search for this): article 2
ng freedom. Military directors have seized upon all the telegraph lines which traverse America in every direction. The same censorship compels their newspapers to publish only what is favorable to the North and unfavorable to the South. And what is the reason for this? The North speaks to the whole world by the electric wires, while information from the South, when it does come, comes tardily. In fact, the journals and correspondence from the South, which reach us by way of Havana and St Thomas, are sometimes five weeks behind hand, and thus lose all interest. The North proclaims martial law with all its severities; it suppresses every independent voice; it threatens the suspected with death. In presence of such despotism the English press has not been able to remain silent. In the midst of such a struggle, between such desperate opponents, who dare say that a spontaneous or likely pacification is possible? Peace can only come from without, and the word ("Mediation")
Beresford Hope (search for this): article 2
y basis for peace. It denounces Gen. Butler and his proclamation in the strongest terms, and says it is enough to enlist universal sympathy for the South. The Manchester Guardian contends that the time for England to interfere has not yet come, if indeed it ever will, and attaches little importance to the French reports of negotiations. It thinks France can go further in the matter than England, and would rejoice to see the struggle ended without the interference of England. Mr. Beresford Hope writes to the London Times in favor of mediation. He claims to have felt the popular pulse in England during the course of lectures which he has been giving on America, and asserts that a great majority of the people would fain see the strife terminated by the establishment of the Southern Confederacy. Miscellaneous foreign items The Prince of Wales reached Windsor June 14, from the East. The Japanese Ambassadors were to embark at Woolwich for Holland on the day that the
Constitutionnel (search for this): article 2
France and England. [from the London Shipping Gazette, June 11.] We transferred to our columns yesterday an article on the American struggle from the Constitutionnel, which is worthy of attentive perusal, not alone for the clearness of the views and the force of the arguments advanced, but because of the very probable inspution, and he asks, naturally enough, to what purpose is this waste of human life, this insane expenditure of the results of human industry? We, like the Constitutionnel, recognize in the terms proposed by Mr. Yancey the "basis of a possible arrangement," and we rejoice at the prospect of mediation founded upon that basis; buttunity be seized to bring the pressure of a friendly Government to hear in the direction where alone it can produce the desired effect. If the article in the Constitutionnel reflects, as it most probably does, the views of the imperial Government, and even foreshadows as policy, let the attempt at mediation be made or renewe
, for its success. The Paris correspondent of the London News, writing on the rumors of mediation, says: You will observe that, according to the wording of the Patric's note, nothing more is affirmed than that France has determined to ask England to join in mediation — a proposal which, in the present state of public information as to the views of the British Government, it might be thought would be certainly refused. Other Paris correspondence speak as if France was already assured on to quarrel with the decision of the Cabinet, and the country will gladly leave the question in the hands of the Government to choose such an opportunity and mode of action as they may deem proper. The London Times, admits that advice from England would not be acceptable; but it would rejoice to see the Emperor of France or the Char of Russia press on the Americans the counsels which would be indignantly rejected if offered by England. The London Times then speculates on the disastro
amped at Nicksich; being short of provisions. The Prince of Montenegro and Mirko had retreated in the direction of Maratz. Commercial intelligence. The London Money Market.--In the London money market the funds were dull, but without mate rial variation in rates. There was considerable demand for money, and the best short paper sold at 3 per cent. Consols closed on Friday, June 13th, at 91 ⅝ @ 91¾ for money. The bullion in the Bank of England had decreased £450,000. Baring says the disposition to sell American stocks continues, and tends to depress prices. The Paris Bourse. Paris, June 14, 1862. The Bourse is firmer. The Rentes closed yesterday (June 13) at 68f. 65 The Liverpool cotton market. Liverpool. June 14, 1862. The Brokers' Circular reports the sales of the week at 84,000 bales. The market has been buoyant and prices are one-quarter to three-eighths of a penny higher. The sales to speculators have been 22,000 bales, and to exp
hat consequently it cannot be addressed to those who would like to engraft a slave war on a civil war, or to those who consider the institution of slavery as an institution of Divine right. This mediation, a point most singularly overlooked, corresponds not only to the most vital interest to commercial Europe, but also to the most sensible minds that represent the interests of America. Let us remember that President Lincoln had pronounced himself in the same sense as, before him, Generals Burnside and Butler did, against an excitement to a slave war, and that in his last proclamation he called to mind his special message, quoting the following resolution, adopted by large majorities by both Houses of Congress: "The United States must co-operate with that State which might adopt the gradual abolition of slavery, by giving to such State, in its judgment, such a compensation as is required for public or private inconveniences resulting from such a change of system." Let u
June 14th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 2
ed on Friday, June 13th, at 91 ⅝ @ 91¾ for money. The bullion in the Bank of England had decreased £450,000. Baring says the disposition to sell American stocks continues, and tends to depress prices. The Paris Bourse. Paris, June 14, 1862. The Bourse is firmer. The Rentes closed yesterday (June 13) at 68f. 65 The Liverpool cotton market. Liverpool. June 14, 1862. The Brokers' Circular reports the sales of the week at 84,000 bales. The market has been buoyant aJune 14, 1862. The Brokers' Circular reports the sales of the week at 84,000 bales. The market has been buoyant and prices are one-quarter to three-eighths of a penny higher. The sales to speculators have been 22,000 bales, and to exporters 23,000. The sales on Friday were 7,000 bales, including 3,500 to speculators and exporters, the market closing firm at the annexed quotations: Fair.Middling. Orleans14½13¼ Mobiles13¾13 Uplands13½12 ⅞ The stock in port is estimated at 289,000 bales, of which 92,000 are American. State of trade. There have been no sales in the Manchester mar
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