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d frequently declared that he should be proud to follow him in character, and for any duty. As for his personal courage, it is enough to say that the very morning General Banks entered Winchester, Ashby went to his headquarters disguised as a market-man, and in reply to questions from staff officers, described his rebel self. The day before the battle of Winchester he rode through the streets of that town, with one of his captains, in Union uniform. One of the most gallant Colonels in Shield's command, who has observed Ashby in three engagements, said in a verbal report to the Government a few days ago, that the Black Horse General had of late become the most reckless man to be found on either side; that he seemed to plunge into all forms of danger with delight, riding wherever the fire was flattest, waving his sword, discharging his pistol at our best officers, and continually inviting hand-to-hand encounters. Our Colonel once saw him leap his horse over an abandoned gun to ma
y service some unpleasant disagreements have taken place. Thus we hear that General Blenker is to be superceded by General Carl Schurz, and that General Shields has fallen from grace, while General McDowell, from an unfortunate accident, is on the list of the sick or disabled. At the same time it is given out that the rebel General Jackson has been heavily reinforced, and that, to be on the safe side, General Fremont is falling back down the Valley for a junction with General Banks and General Sigel. All these things, and many more that we have not touched upon, indicate some confusion in our military operations and among our many Generals of the Shenandoah Valley. We all know, too, that the repulse of Gen. Banks has operated very much to delay the decisive conflict with the main rebel army at Richmond, in delaying the reinforcements which were required by Gen. McClellan. In a word, we apprehend that the present posture of the campaign in Virginia has carried the President to
that on the 13th he got a requisition for 1,880 horses, to supply those killed or broken down in General McDowell's march — all wanted within eight days. William C. Ross, acting master in the U. S. Navy, has been taken into custody in New York on the charge of bigamy. The accused, it is alleged, formed a matrimonial alliance with Miss Brooks, of No. 40. Henry street, in that city, while his first wife, a native of Portland. Maine, was still alive and undivorced from him. Ex-President Van Buren, (now eighty-one years old,) is suffering from a dangerous affection of the throat or bronchial organs. He has maintained the seclusion of a thoroughly private life since his retirement from the Presidency. In the New York Times's account of the engagement on the 18th, below Richmond, where the Yankees claim a victory for the 16th Massachusetts regiment, this significant admission is made: "It is to be regretted that many of the dead and wounded were left on the field." Ac
g this and that together, we think a plausible and somewhat satisfactory conclusion may be reached. First, then, General Scott is at West Point. Secondly, General Pope has arrived at Washington — that splendid young officer, whose great achiev, we conjecture that this visit of President Lincoln to West Point is for the purpose of a military consultation with General Scott, and that the special-object in view is the appointment of General Pope to some important command in Virginia. Since the derangement in that quarter of the original plans of General Scott and General McClellan, our "Onward to Richmond" movement has been embarrassed in every possible way. We have suffered the costly humiliation of the expulsion of General Bankon to West Point. This mission, we believe, can only relate to the campaign in Virginia; and while in regard thereto General Scott is sought for counsel, General Pope has been summoned for active service. We hear some whispers of a possible br
Samuel Sawyer (search for this): article 4
ken the oath of allegiance. Preaching the gospel of treason has been stopped by General Wallace. The rector of the Episcopal Church, who offered prayers for the Southern Confederacy last Sunday, has been effectually admonished. Samuel Sawyer, Chaplain of the Forty-seventh Indiana, preached this morning in the Methodist Church of the runaway rebel Harris, nephew of the Governor. This evening he preached in the Second Presbyterian Church, which dismissed the Rev. Dr. Grundy, on suspicion of his loyalty to the Union. Sawyer is the same clergyman who, in East Tennessee, several years ago, was persecuted for writing an account of Deacon Netherlands cruel whipping of his slave behind his Church. The citizens of Brownsville, Hayward county, raised the Stars and Stripes yesterday. The rebel militia General, Coles, an original Secessionist of Hayward county, sends word to General Wallace that since his cotton was burned he wants to take the oath of allegiance, an
him. Ex-President Van Buren, (now eighty-one years old,) is suffering from a dangerous affection of the throat or bronchial organs. He has maintained the seclusion of a thoroughly private life since his retirement from the Presidency. In the New York Times's account of the engagement on the 18th, below Richmond, where the Yankees claim a victory for the 16th Massachusetts regiment, this significant admission is made: "It is to be regretted that many of the dead and wounded were left on the field." According to the correspondent of the New York World, it was currently rumored at Washington, on Saturday last, that Secretary Stanton was about to resign the portfolio of the War Department, and would be succeeded by Gen. Banks. A daughter of Captain Semmes, commander of the famous privateer Sumter, attended a wedding at St. Paul's Church, Newport, Ky., enveloped in a scarf of rich material, bearing the Confederate colors, red and white, arranged in bars or stripes.
H. L. Sturgis (search for this): article 4
resolutions of stay-at-home patriots will not avail much with the wounded and neglected soldier. Change in the military Commands at Washington. A change has been made in Washington by the divorce of the military from the civil jurisdiction, and the alteration of the mixed authority hitherto exercised by the military government of the District. General Wadsworth has been relieved from the command of all the military in the District, except the Provost Guard on duty in the city. Gen. Sturgis has been assigned to the command of all the military forces in the vicinity of Washington, and has already begun to organize them into brigades, and to make arrangements to increase their efficiency to the greatest extent. Miscellaneous. Both Houses of the Federal Congress have passed a bill prohibiting polygamy in the, territories, and annulling the laws of Utah on the subject. The offence is punishable with a fine not exceeding $500, and imprisonment for five years. Hallo
Pierre Soule (search for this): article 4
e the Democratic ticket again. Picayune Butler and Pierre Soule. The Providence Post, in noticing the arrest of PiePierre Soule by General Butler, and his arrival at New York city as a prisoner, makes the following interesting remarks: utler, now a Major-General of volunteers. "Now, of Pierre Soule: At the adjourned session of the national convention beegate from New Orleans. There were two sets of delegates. Soule and his associates were admitted to seats. Soule was a DouSoule was a Douglas man and an earnest friend of the Union. He made one of the most eloquent speeches for the Union that any man ever listeEvery disunionist at heart certainly hated him. "Well, Soule went home, Douglas was defeated; and when defeated went to New Orleans. Soule was still his friend, and honored him. Douglas went home. "Then came secession. Soule resisted tillSoule resisted till resistance was useless. Then he became silent. He was with his old neighbors and friends. He was at home, in New Orleans
m him. Ex-President Van Buren, (now eighty-one years old,) is suffering from a dangerous affection of the throat or bronchial organs. He has maintained the seclusion of a thoroughly private life since his retirement from the Presidency. In the New York Times's account of the engagement on the 18th, below Richmond, where the Yankees claim a victory for the 16th Massachusetts regiment, this significant admission is made: "It is to be regretted that many of the dead and wounded were left on the field." According to the correspondent of the New York World, it was currently rumored at Washington, on Saturday last, that Secretary Stanton was about to resign the portfolio of the War Department, and would be succeeded by Gen. Banks. A daughter of Captain Semmes, commander of the famous privateer Sumter, attended a wedding at St. Paul's Church, Newport, Ky., enveloped in a scarf of rich material, bearing the Confederate colors, red and white, arranged in bars or stripes.
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): article 4
ah Valley, and the War Office, in repairing this disaster, has not succeeded as well as could be desired. The rebel General Jackson has slipped through the snares that were contrived to catch him, and among our numerous generals now in the Shenandoom an unfortunate accident, is on the list of the sick or disabled. At the same time it is given out that the rebel General Jackson has been heavily reinforced, and that, to be on the safe side, General Fremont is falling back down the Valley for aAshby. A correspondent of the New York Tribune writes concerning the late General Ashby: He was devoted to General Jackson, and frequently declared that he should be proud to follow him in character, and for any duty. As for his personal rsemanship, that be long ago became a marked man, and General Shields predicted that Ashby would surely be killed before Jackson was driven out of the Valley. Drain of gold from New York. The New York Tribune, of the 23d, says: "The
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