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Sturgis has been assigned to the command of all the military forces in the vicinity of Washington, and has already begun to organize them into brigades, and to make arrangements to increase their efficiency to the greatest extent. Miscellaneous. Both Houses of the Federal Congress have passed a bill prohibiting polygamy in the, territories, and annulling the laws of Utah on the subject. The offence is punishable with a fine not exceeding $500, and imprisonment for five years. Hallock telegraphs to the War Department that unofficial information has been received that White river has been opened for one hundred and seventy miles, and Governor Rector and the rebel Government have fled from Little Rock on a flatboat towards Fort Smith. It is mentioned as a significant item that a diplomatic dinner was given to the Mexican Minister, at Washington, a few evenings ago. General Meigs tells the U. S. Senate that on the 13th he got a requisition for 1,880 horses, to sup
ant disagreements have taken place. Thus we hear that General Blenker is to be superceded by General Carl Schurz, and that G in the New York Tribune, dated Winchester, May 9th: Blenker, with his staff, arrived here to-day, en route for Washing may be brought back to a sense of propriety and decency. Blenker is a medium sized, restless, overbearing sort of man, extrything like a recital of the barbarities and butcheries of Blenker's men, and even should I recount a half dozen or so they wgnations in order to escape the odium which the conduct of Blenker's men threw upon them. Gen. Fremont eventually ordered anuth I do not know, that during the examination of some men Blenker became very insolent, upon which Fremont took off his (BleBlenker's) shoulder straps and Broke in two his sword. After his arduous whiskey campaign Gen. Blenker will probably be allowedGen. Blenker will probably be allowed a long rest. Attack on a gunboat. A dispatch from Fortress Monroe (June 23) says: The United States steam s
John C. Breckinridge (search for this): article 4
same B. F. Butler was a delegate to the National Democratic Convention. Elected as a friend of Mr. Douglas, he proved treacherous in the start and became his bittered opponent. He helped to break up the convention. He helped to nominate John C. Breckinridge. He was a co-worker with William L. Yancey. And when the several parties were well in the field he took the stump for his favorite. No man in Massachusetts did so much to sustain the Yancey- Breckinridge disunion party as this same B. FBreckinridge disunion party as this same B. F. Butler, now a Major-General of volunteers. "Now, of Pierre Soule: At the adjourned session of the national convention be appeared in Baltimore with credentials as a delegate from New Orleans. There were two sets of delegates. Soule and his associates were admitted to seats. Soule was a Douglas man and an earnest friend of the Union. He made one of the most eloquent speeches for the Union that any man ever listened to.--We do not believe it was ever surpassed. He exposed the rottennes
George B. McClellan (search for this): article 4
the appointment of General Pope to some important command in Virginia. Since the derangement in that quarter of the original plans of General Scott and General McClellan, our "Onward to Richmond" movement has been embarrassed in every possible way. We have suffered the costly humiliation of the expulsion of General Banks fromf Gen. Banks has operated very much to delay the decisive conflict with the main rebel army at Richmond, in delaying the reinforcements which were required by Gen. McClellan. In a word, we apprehend that the present posture of the campaign in Virginia has carried the President to West Point, and that with his return to Washingtons second in command to Gen. Joe Johnston. It was generally understood in the rebel camps that a number of his troops had arrived, and were with them, opposed to McClellan. My informant was an intelligent man, an old acquaintance of mine, and one I do not think would falsify the matter. He says the food the Virginia soldiers get
merchants have taken the oath of allegiance. Preaching the gospel of treason has been stopped by General Wallace. The rector of the Episcopal Church, who offered prayers for the Southern Confederacy last Sunday, has been effectually admonished. Samuel Sawyer, Chaplain of the Forty-seventh Indiana, preached this morning in the Methodist Church of the runaway rebel Harris, nephew of the Governor. This evening he preached in the Second Presbyterian Church, which dismissed the Rev. Dr. Grundy, on suspicion of his loyalty to the Union. Sawyer is the same clergyman who, in East Tennessee, several years ago, was persecuted for writing an account of Deacon Netherlands cruel whipping of his slave behind his Church. The citizens of Brownsville, Hayward county, raised the Stars and Stripes yesterday. The rebel militia General, Coles, an original Secessionist of Hayward county, sends word to General Wallace that since his cotton was burned he wants to take the oath
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): article 4
again. Picayune Butler and Pierre Soule. The Providence Post, in noticing the arrest of Pierre Soule by General Butler, and his arrival at New York city as a prisoner, makes the following interesting remarks: "In 1860 this same B. F. Butler was a delegate to the National Democratic Convention. Elected as a friend of Mr. Douglas, he proved treacherous in the start and became his bittered opponent. He helped to break up the convention. He helped to nominate John C. Breckinridge. He was a co-worker with William L. Yancey. And when the several parties were well in the field he took the stump for his favorite. No man in Massachusetts did so much to sustain the Yancey- Breckinridge disunion party as this same B. F. Butler, now a Major-General of volunteers. "Now, of Pierre Soule: At the adjourned session of the national convention be appeared in Baltimore with credentials as a delegate from New Orleans. There were two sets of delegates. Soule and his associates w
ence is punishable with a fine not exceeding $500, and imprisonment for five years. Hallock telegraphs to the War Department that unofficial information has been received that White river has been opened for one hundred and seventy miles, and Governor Rector and the rebel Government have fled from Little Rock on a flatboat towards Fort Smith. It is mentioned as a significant item that a diplomatic dinner was given to the Mexican Minister, at Washington, a few evenings ago. General Meigs tells the U. S. Senate that on the 13th he got a requisition for 1,880 horses, to supply those killed or broken down in General McDowell's march — all wanted within eight days. William C. Ross, acting master in the U. S. Navy, has been taken into custody in New York on the charge of bigamy. The accused, it is alleged, formed a matrimonial alliance with Miss Brooks, of No. 40. Henry street, in that city, while his first wife, a native of Portland. Maine, was still alive and undivor
es that were contrived to catch him, and among our numerous generals now in the Shenandoah Valley service some unpleasant disagreements have taken place. Thus we hear that General Blenker is to be superceded by General Carl Schurz, and that General Shields has fallen from grace, while General McDowell, from an unfortunate accident, is on the list of the sick or disabled. At the same time it is given out that the rebel General Jackson has been heavily reinforced, and that, to be on the safe si, and continually inviting hand-to-hand encounters. Our Colonel once saw him leap his horse over an abandoned gun to make such an attack. So peculiar, by its skill and daring, was his horsemanship, that be long ago became a marked man, and General Shields predicted that Ashby would surely be killed before Jackson was driven out of the Valley. Drain of gold from New York. The New York Tribune, of the 23d, says: "The foreign drain of gold was unexpectedly large on Saturday, exce
g our numerous generals now in the Shenandoah Valley service some unpleasant disagreements have taken place. Thus we hear that General Blenker is to be superceded by General Carl Schurz, and that General Shields has fallen from grace, while General McDowell, from an unfortunate accident, is on the list of the sick or disabled. At the same time it is given out that the rebel General Jackson has been heavily reinforced, and that, to be on the safe side, General Fremont is falling back down the Vnt item that a diplomatic dinner was given to the Mexican Minister, at Washington, a few evenings ago. General Meigs tells the U. S. Senate that on the 13th he got a requisition for 1,880 horses, to supply those killed or broken down in General McDowell's march — all wanted within eight days. William C. Ross, acting master in the U. S. Navy, has been taken into custody in New York on the charge of bigamy. The accused, it is alleged, formed a matrimonial alliance with Miss Brooks, of N
is arrested and sent North. "That is all, and we suppose it is all right." The late Gen. Ashby. A correspondent of the New York Tribune writes concerning the late General Ashby: HGeneral Ashby: He was devoted to General Jackson, and frequently declared that he should be proud to follow him in character, and for any duty. As for his personal courage, it is enough to say that the very morning General Banks entered Winchester, Ashby went to his headquarters disguised as a market-man, and in reply to questions from staff officers, described his rebel self. The day before the battle of Wins, in Union uniform. One of the most gallant Colonels in Shield's command, who has observed Ashby in three engagements, said in a verbal report to the Government a few days ago, that the Black H, was his horsemanship, that be long ago became a marked man, and General Shields predicted that Ashby would surely be killed before Jackson was driven out of the Valley. Drain of gold from New
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