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so happens that the "rebels" were not driven off, but the gunboat was.] From Memphis. Memphis June 22, 1862. Over two hundred merchants have taken the oath of allegiance. Preaching the gospel of treason has been stopped by General Wallace. The rector of the Episcopal Church, who offered prayers for the Southern Confederacy last Sunday, has been effectually admonished. Samuel Sawyer, Chaplain of the Forty-seventh Indiana, preached this morning in the Methodist Churcherlands cruel whipping of his slave behind his Church. The citizens of Brownsville, Hayward county, raised the Stars and Stripes yesterday. The rebel militia General, Coles, an original Secessionist of Hayward county, sends word to General Wallace that since his cotton was burned he wants to take the oath of allegiance, and also the oath never to vote the Democratic ticket again. Picayune Butler and Pierre Soule. The Providence Post, in noticing the arrest of Pierre Soule by
t at heart certainly hated him. "Well, Soule went home, Douglas was defeated; and when defeated went to New Orleans. Soule was still his friend, and honored him. Douglas went home. "Then came secession. Soule resisted till resistance was useless. Then he became silent. He was with his old neighbors and friends. He was at home, in New Orleans canal his lot was fixed. "The next five hour of him, Butler enters his city as a conqueror. By and by he is arrested and sent North. "That is all, and we suppose it is all right." The late Gen. Ashby. A correspondent of the New York Tribune writes concerning the late General Ashby: He was devoted to General Jackson, and frequently declared that he should be proud to follow him in character, and for any duty. As for his personal courage, it is enough to say that the very morning General Banks entered Winchester, Ashby went to his headquarters disguised as a market-man, and in reply to questions from
Carl Schurz (search for this): article 4
has slipped through the snares that were contrived to catch him, and among our numerous generals now in the Shenandoah Valley service some unpleasant disagreements have taken place. Thus we hear that General Blenker is to be superceded by General Carl Schurz, and that General Shields has fallen from grace, while General McDowell, from an unfortunate accident, is on the list of the sick or disabled. At the same time it is given out that the rebel General Jackson has been heavily reinforced, an, May 9th: Blenker, with his staff, arrived here to-day, en route for Washington, the General, I am informed, having been relieved of his command, which is completely demoralized. Under the able management and controlling influence of Gen. Carl Schurz, the men may be brought back to a sense of propriety and decency. Blenker is a medium sized, restless, overbearing sort of man, extremely rude and boisterous. Himself and staff stopped here a night; and every time they moved about the hote
Picayune Butler (search for this): article 4
bel militia General, Coles, an original Secessionist of Hayward county, sends word to General Wallace that since his cotton was burned he wants to take the oath of allegiance, and also the oath never to vote the Democratic ticket again. Picayune Butler and Pierre Soule. The Providence Post, in noticing the arrest of Pierre Soule by General Butler, and his arrival at New York city as a prisoner, makes the following interesting remarks: "In 1860 this same B. F. Butler was a delegatGeneral Butler, and his arrival at New York city as a prisoner, makes the following interesting remarks: "In 1860 this same B. F. Butler was a delegate to the National Democratic Convention. Elected as a friend of Mr. Douglas, he proved treacherous in the start and became his bittered opponent. He helped to break up the convention. He helped to nominate John C. Breckinridge. He was a co-worker with William L. Yancey. And when the several parties were well in the field he took the stump for his favorite. No man in Massachusetts did so much to sustain the Yancey- Breckinridge disunion party as this same B. F. Butler, now a Major-General o
William L. Yancey (search for this): article 4
erre Soule. The Providence Post, in noticing the arrest of Pierre Soule by General Butler, and his arrival at New York city as a prisoner, makes the following interesting remarks: "In 1860 this same B. F. Butler was a delegate to the National Democratic Convention. Elected as a friend of Mr. Douglas, he proved treacherous in the start and became his bittered opponent. He helped to break up the convention. He helped to nominate John C. Breckinridge. He was a co-worker with William L. Yancey. And when the several parties were well in the field he took the stump for his favorite. No man in Massachusetts did so much to sustain the Yancey- Breckinridge disunion party as this same B. F. Butler, now a Major-General of volunteers. "Now, of Pierre Soule: At the adjourned session of the national convention be appeared in Baltimore with credentials as a delegate from New Orleans. There were two sets of delegates. Soule and his associates were admitted to seats. Soule was
e arrangements to increase their efficiency to the greatest extent. Miscellaneous. Both Houses of the Federal Congress have passed a bill prohibiting polygamy in the, territories, and annulling the laws of Utah on the subject. The offence is punishable with a fine not exceeding $500, and imprisonment for five years. Hallock telegraphs to the War Department that unofficial information has been received that White river has been opened for one hundred and seventy miles, and Governor Rector and the rebel Government have fled from Little Rock on a flatboat towards Fort Smith. It is mentioned as a significant item that a diplomatic dinner was given to the Mexican Minister, at Washington, a few evenings ago. General Meigs tells the U. S. Senate that on the 13th he got a requisition for 1,880 horses, to supply those killed or broken down in General McDowell's march — all wanted within eight days. William C. Ross, acting master in the U. S. Navy, has been taken i
barrassed in every possible way. We have suffered the costly humiliation of the expulsion of General Banks from the Shenandoah Valley, and the War Office, in repairing this disaster, has not succeede to be on the safe side, General Fremont is falling back down the Valley for a junction with General Banks and General Sigel. All these things, and many more that we have not touched upon, indics and among our many Generals of the Shenandoah Valley. We all know, too, that the repulse of Gen. Banks has operated very much to delay the decisive conflict with the main rebel army at Richmond, inr, and for any duty. As for his personal courage, it is enough to say that the very morning General Banks entered Winchester, Ashby went to his headquarters disguised as a market-man, and in reply tary Stanton was about to resign the portfolio of the War Department, and would be succeeded by Gen. Banks. A daughter of Captain Semmes, commander of the famous privateer Sumter, attended a weddi
ng to the movements of the war: Lincoln on a Mysteries journey — Pope, the Rising Hero. On Tuesday, the 24th, Lincoln made a hasty joued. First, then, General Scott is at West Point. Secondly, General Pope has arrived at Washington — that splendid young officer, whose gScott, and that the special-object in view is the appointment of General Pope to some important command in Virginia. Since the derangemenilitary chessboard in Virginia, including an important command to Gen. Pope. In this connection we understand that it is not alone by his late brilliant achievements in the West that General Pope has attracted the attention of the President. The President and the General are f was strengthened by certain rebuffs and rebukes administered to General Pope by the late Administration, in consequence of some friendly act and while in regard thereto General Scott is sought for counsel, General Pope has been summoned for active service. We hear some whispers
nd, and is second in command to Gen. Joe Johnston. It was generally understood in the rebel camps that a number of his troops had arrived, and were with them, opposed to McClellan. My informant was an intelligent man, an old acquaintance of mine, and one I do not think would falsify the matter. He says the food the Virginia soldiers get is poor, but they have enough to eat always, except when on the march. More Legislation for "West Virginia." In the Federal Senate, on the 23d, Mr. Wade, from the Committee on Territories, reported a bill providing for the admission of the State of West Virginia into the Union. This bill virtually ignores the action of the late Convention held at Wheeling to frame a constitution for Western Virginia, and adds to the proposed new State the entire Valley of Virginia, including the counties of Berkeley, Jefferson, Clarke, Frederick, Warren, Page, Shenandoah, Rockingham, Augusta, Highland, Bath, Rockbridge, Craig, Botetourt, and Allegheny.
Joe Johnston (search for this): article 4
ily involve any change in the money market." Where is Beauregard? Various reports have been published in the Northern papers stating that Gen. Beauregard was in Richmond, or on his way there. The Fortress Monroe correspondent of the Philadelphia Press, writing under date of the 21st, says: I learn from a member of the Governor's Guard, of Richmond, Va., captured at Ashland yesterday morning, that General Beauregard is positively at Richmond, and is second in command to Gen. Joe Johnston. It was generally understood in the rebel camps that a number of his troops had arrived, and were with them, opposed to McClellan. My informant was an intelligent man, an old acquaintance of mine, and one I do not think would falsify the matter. He says the food the Virginia soldiers get is poor, but they have enough to eat always, except when on the march. More Legislation for "West Virginia." In the Federal Senate, on the 23d, Mr. Wade, from the Committee on Territories,
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