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Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 7
with the Yankees if the opportunity is ever afforded them. Among the exchanged prisoners from Fort Delaware who have arrived here is Jos. McMurran, of the 4th Virginia regiment, captured at Kernstown. He agrees with his companions that the treatment of Confederate soldiers was brutal in the extreme. The officers and soldiers in immediate contact with the prisoners were Dutch, and their brutality to our men was without mitigation. In return, our men say that there won't be any more Pennsylvania Dutchmen taken prisoners by them during this war. Striking a prisoner over the head or running a bayonet at him was a common occurrence. A Dutch Provost Marshal, named Segebarth, excelled his brother brutes in maltreating the prisoners. A dungeon, made to accommodate three men, often contained fourteen, and their sufferings were very great. The fare was bread and a very small piece of salt pork twice a day, and bean soup of about the consistency of water. Nearly two thirds of the men
San Juan River (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 7
imidation, but the worst frightened man in the fort was the valorous Dutch Major, Segebarth. The privateersmen were kept in camp in a low, marshy place, and one night some of the Yankee soldiers, to increase their sufferings, turned the water in upon them and completely overflowed their quarters. They were compelled to sleep in mud and water a considerable portion of the time, and the consequence was that several died. Mr. Hall, of the 3d Florida regiment, who was arrested on St. John's river on the 27th of April, arrived in Richmond yesterday from Fort Delaware. Though a private soldier, he was charged with being the captain of a guerrilla company, and treated worse than if he had been a pirate. For two months he was kept on board a gunboat in irons, while a man stood over him with a sabre bayonet and pistol, with orders to kill him if he attempted to move from his place. He was subsequently sent to Philadelphia, and marched in irons through the streets of that city and
Fort Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): article 7
Prison life at Fort Delaware. Capt. Beckwith West, of the 48th Virginia regiment, was captured by the enemy at Front Royal, on the 30th of May, and taken to Fort Delaware, where he was held as prisoner until exchanged a few days ago. In a narration of his prison experiences h river on the 27th of April, arrived in Richmond yesterday from Fort Delaware. Though a private soldier, he was charged with being the capta New York, then sent to Fort Lafayette, but soon transferred to Fort Delaware, where his irons were removed. He was treated with some kindneut were finally compelled to yield. All the prisoners form Fort Delaware are indignant at the treatment they received, and their purpose is ever afforded them. Among the exchanged prisoners from Fort Delaware who have arrived here is Jos. McMurran, of the 4th Virginia reg miseries of a Northern prison. Just before the prisoners left Fort Delaware the following order from the War Department was read: [Extr
Front Royal (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
Prison life at Fort Delaware. Capt. Beckwith West, of the 48th Virginia regiment, was captured by the enemy at Front Royal, on the 30th of May, and taken to Fort Delaware, where he was held as prisoner until exchanged a few days ago. In a narration of his prison experiences he says that the Confederate commissioned officers, forty-seven in number, were confined in a room forty feet long by fifteen in width, the ascent to which was made by a ladder twenty feet long, which was taken away every night. On some days, as the caprice of the commanding officer happened to be, the officers were permitted to walk for half an hour on the parapet of the fort. Officers and privates were subjected to the same fare, which consisted of a small allowance of sour bread and salt meat twice a day, with an occasional introduction of very weak soup. The Government allowance for rations purports to be sixteen cents a day for each prisoner; but it was stated in a Philadelphia newspaper that Capt. Gi
Col. Zarvona. This gallant officer, so well known for his daring feat in accomplishing the capture of the steamer St. Nicholas and other vessels on the Potomac, still languishes in one of the gloomy cells of Fort Lafayette. Some of our men who have been permitted to return home by the Yankees, say that for five months past trived, by tying notes to nails and throwing them in the window, to hear from him; but the fact be coming known to the Yankee commandant of the prison, he marched Zarvona to the guard-house, dressed one of his own Sergeants in the Colonel's habiliments, and placed him at the window to receive the notes intended for him. Not knowingeive the notes intended for him. Not knowing this, several of our men were detected and put in irons. When Col. Zarvona was captured, he was a commissioned Colonel in a Virginia regiment, and is, therefore, though he was not captured in battle, but by a ruse, entitled to all the privileges accorded to any other prisoner of war.
S. B. Buckner (search for this): article 10
Arrival of exchanged Confederate prisoners. Among the Confederate officers who arrived yesterday from the Northern prisons are Generals S. B. Buckner and Lloyd Tilghman, of Kentucky, General Pettigrew, of South Carolina, and Com. Barron and Capt. Beverly Kennon, of the C. S. navy. The following officers registered their names at Gen. Winder's office during the day, and were assigned quarters at the various hotels: Capt Wm L Wingfield, 28th Virginia regiment--captured at Williamsburg. Second Lieut J K Dekron, 12th Georgia regiment--Front Royal. Second Lieut G B Samuel, 30th Virginia regiment--Front Royal. Lieut. Col J O Long, 22d North Carolina regiment--Seven Pines. Second Lieut W T Anderson, 5th North Carolina regiment--Williamsburg. Second Lieut C C Burks, 4th Virginia regiment--Keras-own. Col Edward C Cook, 32d Tennessee regiment--Fort Donelson. Lieut-Col M B Carter, 20th Tennessee regiment--Fishing Creek. Lieut-Col Thos F Winston,
John H. Winder (search for this): article 10
esterday from the Northern prisons are Generals S. B. Buckner and Lloyd Tilghman, of Kentucky, General Pettigrew, of South Carolina, and Com. Barron and Capt. Beverly Kennon, of the C. S. navy. The following officers registered their names at Gen. Winder's office during the day, and were assigned quarters at the various hotels: Capt Wm L Wingfield, 28th Virginia regiment--captured at Williamsburg. Second Lieut J K Dekron, 12th Georgia regiment--Front Royal. Second Lieut G B Samu--Seven Pines. Second Lieutenant G E Plaster, 6th Virginia cavalry--Upperville. By orders issued from the War Department, all officers and men exchanged under the cartel, arriving in James river, will report immediately to the commandants of their respective regiments, if they are near Richmond, otherwise they will report to Gen. John H. Winder, commanding Department of Henrico, who will furnish them with quarters and subsistence until transportation can be given to their regiments.
nia regiment--Front Royal. First Lieut S C Williams, C S Artillery--Kerns town. Second Lieut Thos Carty, 7th Louisiana regiment--Gaines's Mill. Second Lieut J P Young, 7th North Carolina regiment--White Oak Swamp. Second Lieut C D Boyd, Nelsons Artillery — Seven Pines. Second Lieut A Finley, 22d North Carolina regiment--Seven Pines. Second Lieut P S Hagy, 37th Virginia regiment--Winchester. First Lieut J N Lyle, 4th Virginia regiment--Kernstown. Major T Graybill, 28th Georgia regiment--Seven Pines. Colonel Jos Drake, 4th Mississippi regiment--Fort Donelson. First Lieut Sol Skein, 7th Arkansas regiment--St Louis. Second Lieut W O Clegg, 14th Georgia regiment--Seven Pines. Second Lieut J R F Miller, 49th Georgia regiment--Seven Pines. Second Lieutenant Chas E Botts, 33d Virginia regiment--Middletown. Second Lieutenant Jas S Oden, 6th Virginia cavalry--Salem. Second Lieutenant J G Witcher, 21st Virginia regiment--Kerns
Lloyd Tilghman (search for this): article 10
Arrival of exchanged Confederate prisoners. Among the Confederate officers who arrived yesterday from the Northern prisons are Generals S. B. Buckner and Lloyd Tilghman, of Kentucky, General Pettigrew, of South Carolina, and Com. Barron and Capt. Beverly Kennon, of the C. S. navy. The following officers registered their names at Gen. Winder's office during the day, and were assigned quarters at the various hotels: Capt Wm L Wingfield, 28th Virginia regiment--captured at Williamsburg. Second Lieut J K Dekron, 12th Georgia regiment--Front Royal. Second Lieut G B Samuel, 30th Virginia regiment--Front Royal. Lieut. Col J O Long, 22d North Carolina regiment--Seven Pines. Second Lieut W T Anderson, 5th North Carolina regiment--Williamsburg. Second Lieut C C Burks, 4th Virginia regiment--Keras-own. Col Edward C Cook, 32d Tennessee regiment--Fort Donelson. Lieut-Col M B Carter, 20th Tennessee regiment--Fishing Creek. Lieut-Col Thos F Winston,
Fort Donelson. First Lieut Sol Skein, 7th Arkansas regiment--St Louis. Second Lieut W O Clegg, 14th Georgia regiment--Seven Pines. Second Lieut J R F Miller, 49th Georgia regiment--Seven Pines. Second Lieutenant Chas E Botts, 33d Virginia regiment--Middletown. Second Lieutenant Jas S Oden, 6th Virginia cavalry--Salem. Second Lieutenant J G Witcher, 21st Virginia regiment--Kernstown. Captain S M Summers, 21st Virginia regiment--Front Royal. Lieut-Col R W McGavock, 10th Tennessee regiment--Fort Donelson. Second Lieutenant L F McMasters, 22d North Carolina regiment--Seven Pines. Major H A Hervert, 8th Alabama regiment--Seven Pines. First Lieutenant W J M Preston, 14th Georgia regiment--Seven Pines. Second Lieutenant G E Plaster, 6th Virginia cavalry--Upperville. By orders issued from the War Department, all officers and men exchanged under the cartel, arriving in James river, will report immediately to the commandants of their
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