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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 19, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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Flat Rock (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 12
Judge Mitchell King of Charleston, S. C., died at Flat Rock, N. C., on the 13th inst.
ell me a little anecdote which had happened when he first came to the bar. An old man, he said, had applied to him to bring a suit, and made out a capital case, as he thought; but when the evidence was detailed before the jury it was the worst case he had ever listened to, and while the evidence was going on the old man came, listening to the evidence himself, and whispered in his ear, "Guv it up."--(Laughter) "Now," said he, "Governor, wouldn't this be 'guvin' it up! " I assure you, Mr. Chairman, I don't present it in any light different from that in which it actually acourred — none whatever. I said to him: "Mr. President, it may be said that it would be 'guvin' it up; but hadn't you better 'guv it up' without bloodshed than drench this land with blood, and then have to 'guv it up!'" (Applause) He then asked what he was to do with his oath of office — He said he had sworn to see the laws faithfully executed, and, addressing himself to me, he said: "I would like to know from you
Highly interesting Revelations — the last interview about the "Union"--Lincoln Tells two Anecdotes — he Wonders if Bell or Douglas would have Stood what he Stood? The detailed interview herewith subjoined, as given by ex-Gov. Morehead in his recent Liverpool speech, will be found highly interesting and instructive. It should to a position of that kind; that it had never entered into his head; but that from the fact of his having made a race for the Senate of the United States with Judge Douglas, in the State of Illinois, his name became prominent, and he was accidentally selected and elected afterwards as President of the United States; that running tt it was." We then, all of us, got up and were standing. I was on the outer circle. He said: "Well, gentlemen, I have been wondering very much whether, if Mr. Douglas of Mr. Bell had been elected President, you would have dared to talk to him as freely as you have to me." I did not hear the answer, but I am told that Mr.
Highly interesting Revelations — the last interview about the "Union"--Lincoln Tells two Anecdotes — he Wonders if Bell or Douglas would have Stood what he Stood? The detailed interview herewith subjoined, as given by ex-Gov. Morehead in his recent Liverpool speech, will be found highly interesting and instructive. It should be read by every one: Mr. Lincoln commenced the conversation, after receiving us very kindly, by stating that he was accidentally elected President of the Unitedpossess shall be exerted to promote the Union and to restore it to what it was." We then, all of us, got up and were standing. I was on the outer circle. He said: "Well, gentlemen, I have been wondering very much whether, if Mr. Douglas of Mr. Bell had been elected President, you would have dared to talk to him as freely as you have to me." I did not hear the answer, but I am told that Mr. Guthrie answered him about in this way: "Mr. President, if Gen Washington occupied the seat that
d back and said, "Mr. President, I have no authority to speak for Virginia, I am one of the humblest of her sons; but if you will guarantee to do that, it will be one of the wisest things you have ever done. Do that, and give us guarantees, and I can only promise you that whatever influence I possess shall be exerted to promote the Union and to restore it to what it was." We then, all of us, got up and were standing. I was on the outer circle. He said: "Well, gentlemen, I have been wondering very much whether, if Mr. Douglas of Mr. Bell had been elected President, you would have dared to talk to him as freely as you have to me." I did not hear the answer, but I am told that Mr. Guthrie answered him about in this way: "Mr. President, if Gen Washington occupied the seat that you will soon fill, and it had been necessary to talk to him as we have to you to save such a Union as this, I for one should talk to him as we have to you." (Hear, hear) That closed the conversation.
id and countenance in averting a calamity like that." Before he replied, Mr. Rives, of Va, got up. We had before that conversed sitting in a semi circle around the President; but Mr. Rives rose from his chair, and with a dignity and eloquence that I have seldom heard surpassed in the course of my life, he appealed to him I heart and soul." (Hear, hear.) Mr. Lincoln jumped up from his chair, as Mr. Rives was standing, advanced one step towards him, and said: "Mr. Rives, Mr. Rives,Mr. Rives, Mr. Rives, if Virginia will stay in I will withdraw the troops from Fort Sumter." Mr. Rives stepped back and said, "Mr. President, I have no authority to speak for VirginMr. Rives, if Virginia will stay in I will withdraw the troops from Fort Sumter." Mr. Rives stepped back and said, "Mr. President, I have no authority to speak for Virginia, I am one of the humblest of her sons; but if you will guarantee to do that, it will be one of the wisest things you have ever done. Do that, and give us guarantMr. Rives stepped back and said, "Mr. President, I have no authority to speak for Virginia, I am one of the humblest of her sons; but if you will guarantee to do that, it will be one of the wisest things you have ever done. Do that, and give us guarantees, and I can only promise you that whatever influence I possess shall be exerted to promote the Union and to restore it to what it was." We then, all of us, got up
subjoined, as given by ex-Gov. Morehead in his recent Liverpool speech, will be found highly interesting and instructive. It should be read by every one: Mr. Lincoln commenced the conversation, after receiving us very kindly, by stating that he was accidentally elected President of the United States; that he never aspired to in substance this — that it was an exceedingly interesting anecdote, and very apprepes, but not altogether a satisfactory answer to me, and then said to him, "Mr. Lincoln, this to me, sir, is the most serious and all absorbing subject that has ever engaged my attention as a public man. I deprecate and look with horror upon a frat seceding States. "Nay, sir," he said, "old as I am, and dearly as I have loved this Union, in that event I go, with all my heart and soul." (Hear, hear.) Mr. Lincoln jumped up from his chair, as Mr. Rives was standing, advanced one step towards him, and said: "Mr. Rives, Mr. Rives, if Virginia will stay in I will withdraw th
Highly interesting Revelations — the last interview about the "Union"--Lincoln Tells two Anecdotes — he Wonders if Bell or Douglas would have Stood what he Stood? The detailed interview herewith subjoined, as given by ex-Gov. Morehead in his recent Liverpool speech, will be found highly interesting and instructive. It should be read by every one: Mr. Lincoln commenced the conversation, after receiving us very kindly, by stating that he was accidentally elected President of the United States; that he never aspired to a position of that kind; that it had never entered into his head; but that from the fact of his having made a race for the Senate of the United States with Judge Douglas, in the State of Illinois, his name became prominent, and he was accidentally selected and elected afterwards as President of the United States; that running that race in a local election his speeches had been published; and that any one might examine his speeches and they would see that he had
about his identical words. I responded at once to him that I did not intend to recall to him that he was a minority President, but simply to announce the broad fact that he was the President not of the men who voted for him, but of the whole people of the United States, and that of the wishes and feelings and interests of the whole people of the United States--the party with 1,100,000 majority as well as the minority party by whom he was elected, ought to be consulted by him. General Donovan here interposed and presented three alternative propositions to him. First, that be might remain perfectly idle and passive and let the disintegration of the States go on as it had gone on; secondly, give guarantees such as were asked, and bring the whole power of his Administration to bear in obtaining those guarantees; or, thirdly, resort to coercion and attempt to force the seceding States into obedience. He illustrated very distinctly and clearly those three propositions. When
Gen Washington (search for this): article 13
ed back and said, "Mr. President, I have no authority to speak for Virginia, I am one of the humblest of her sons; but if you will guarantee to do that, it will be one of the wisest things you have ever done. Do that, and give us guarantees, and I can only promise you that whatever influence I possess shall be exerted to promote the Union and to restore it to what it was." We then, all of us, got up and were standing. I was on the outer circle. He said: "Well, gentlemen, I have been wondering very much whether, if Mr. Douglas of Mr. Bell had been elected President, you would have dared to talk to him as freely as you have to me." I did not hear the answer, but I am told that Mr. Guthrie answered him about in this way: "Mr. President, if Gen Washington occupied the seat that you will soon fill, and it had been necessary to talk to him as we have to you to save such a Union as this, I for one should talk to him as we have to you." (Hear, hear) That closed the conversation.
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