hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 52 0 Browse Search
A. E. Burnside 18 0 Browse Search
H. W. Halleck 14 2 Browse Search
M. F. Maury 14 0 Browse Search
Lee 11 5 Browse Search
Gen Burnside 10 0 Browse Search
William B. Mumford 10 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 8 0 Browse Search
Gen Franklin 6 0 Browse Search
Gen Sumner 6 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 23, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 160 total hits in 91 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
represent that a strong rebel cavalry force was marching into Kentucky from Clarksville. It may or may not be so. From Cairo we learn that Gen. Hovey's expedition on the Mississippi has returned to Helena, Arkansas. The results of the expedition are one hundred and sixty rebels killed, wounded and captured, and our loss thirty-four killed, wounded and missing. The army of Gen. Sherman has returned to Memphis. The rebel army of Mississippi is said to be between Jackson and Canton. Gen. Grant is still at Oxford with his forces, and an immediate advance is not expected. A party of guerrillas burnt the steamer Lake City at Concordia. Ark, on Monday of last week, and in retaliation a U. S steamer the next day destroyed forty-two houses in the place. A band of rebels, numbering two thousand, was surprised at Tuscumbia, on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, east of Corinth, and completely routed by two regiments of National infantry and one company of cavalry. The St. Loui
y-two houses in the place. A band of rebels, numbering two thousand, was surprised at Tuscumbia, on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, east of Corinth, and completely routed by two regiments of National infantry and one company of cavalry. The St. Louis Republican says dispatches have been received from Gen Herron confirming the magnitude of the battle of Yuille Grove. Gen. H states, that "within the space of two acres 250 of our own and the enemy's dead were found." --The death of Gen. Stein, of Missouri, is confirmed. The latest intelligence from the Southwest is to the effect that Hindman, with his forces, was falling back to the vicinity of Little Rock, where a force of some 18,000 men is stationed under the com command of Gen. Holmes. The principal camp is said to be at Austin, 25 miles north of Little Rock. A voyage with rebels — Maury, Ferguson, and others on board the Arabia--What they said and How they looked. A correspondent of the Boston Commercial Bullet
igh place and bottom. Yet, both wings labored under the disadvantage of righting from low against the enemy on high ground. The obstructions of the sense of the action on our right, in the form of walls, fences and houses, unavoidably confined the movement of our troops, as they successively advanced to the front, to the streets, which were so constantly and completely blocked up during the afternoon that it was impossible for the ammunition trains to reach the divisions of French and Hancock, after they were relieved by others, and supply them with cartridges. They were there by virtually placed hors de combat greatly weakening the force of our attack. Whatever the results of the battle may be termed — check or repulse-- it is certain that the failure to accomplish what we attempted is not the only evil fruit of yesterday. I have spent several hours this morning in visiting the field and the positions held by our troops, and I found the most unmistakable evidence everywh
th Pennsylvania; Jennings, 26th New York; O'Nell, 63d New York. Bardwell, of Pennsylvania; Cavanaugh, 69th New York; Philbrook, 16th Massachuset is. Captains Cameroon, 9th New York; Carpenter, 91st New York; Hart, Assistant Adjutant General to Gen. Tyler; Andrew Mahoney. 19th Massachusetts; M. Dunn, 19th Massachusetts, Hendrickson, 9th New York, G. G. Weymonth and J. R. Smith, 136th Pennsylvania; Slater, 15th N York; Leddy, 69th New York; Houghton; 14th Indiana; Burke, 88th New York; Donnovan, 69th New York; Cartwright, 63d New York. Our total loss in officers and men is variously stated at from five to ten thousand. The plan of the battle. A correspondent of the New York Times concludes a description of the battle of Saturday with the following reflections: Shall we say, then it was a defeat? Certainly. If to have started out to accomplish a certain object, and to have failed in doing so, be a defeat, you can apply no other term to the upshot of to day's bat
Rosecrans (search for this): article 5
side said, in conclusion, that he was compelled to advance by orders from Washington. The reported wounding of Gen. Meagher is a mistake. His horse fell upon him, but he was only slightly injured, and is still in command of what remains of his brigade. Matters in the West. Dates from Nashville to the 10th show that the dispatches to the press on that day, representing that the rebels had assumed the offensive, were founded upon skirmishing within ten miles of Nashville. Rosecrans, it is asserted, is nearly ready to move upon the enemy. Jeff. Davis and Bishop Polk spoke at Murfreesboro. Friday night, the former declaring that Tennessee should be held at all hazard. Less than forty thousand rebels were between Murfreesboro and Nashville. The rebels have increased their force at Nolensville, Tenn and the Federals are still at Clarksville. Dispatches from Louisville and Evansville represent that a strong rebel cavalry force was marching into Kentucky from Clarksvi
ff. Davis and Bishop Polk spoke at Murfreesboro. Friday night, the former declaring that Tennessee should be held at all hazard. Less than forty thousand rebels were between Murfreesboro and Nashville. The rebels have increased their force at Nolensville, Tenn and the Federals are still at Clarksville. Dispatches from Louisville and Evansville represent that a strong rebel cavalry force was marching into Kentucky from Clarksville. It may or may not be so. From Cairo we learn that Gen. Hovey's expedition on the Mississippi has returned to Helena, Arkansas. The results of the expedition are one hundred and sixty rebels killed, wounded and captured, and our loss thirty-four killed, wounded and missing. The army of Gen. Sherman has returned to Memphis. The rebel army of Mississippi is said to be between Jackson and Canton. Gen. Grant is still at Oxford with his forces, and an immediate advance is not expected. A party of guerrillas burnt the steamer Lake City at Concordia. A
indicated and with the result known, none could possibly be more magnificent or more nearly impregnable. With fifty thousand men they should easily hold it with three times that number of assailants. And, indeed, they appear never to have employed more than about than about that number. Every time we poured forward fresh men they had ready reinforcements to match. From prisoners taken I learn that on the right, commanded by Jackson, half of the force only (and chiefly the division of A P Hill and Farly's brigade) was engaged. I take it that they had along the line of the Rappahannock about one hundred thousand men, and that 50,000, more or less, were actually engaged in the contest. The Confederate loaders have acted with their usual wiliness in this whole matter. They did well to let us easily into Fredericksburg, firing but a half dozen guns., when they could have brought a hundred to bear upon us. The city itself was the veriest trap that ever was laid — and we have walke
Gen Burnside (search for this): article 5
as peremptorily ordered by the military authorities in Washington. The World makes the following remarkable statement: We have no words of unkindness for Gen Burnside. He is a very different style of man from the braggart Pope, and deserves commiseration rather than censure in his heavy misfortune. Gen Burnside acted underGen Burnside acted under strict orders; he was complies to move upon Fredericksburg by peremptory directions from Washington, which domineered over his judgment and extorted his obedience. Whembe was ordered to Fredericksburg he had the promise of Gen. Halleck that this pontoons should meet him there Gen. Halleck forgot to give the order, and they were delayed so long that the enemy occupied the heights. In this emergency a council of war was held; all the corps commanders opposed an advance; but Burnside said, in conclusion, that he was compelled to advance by orders from Washington. The reported wounding of Gen. Meagher is a mistake. His horse fell upon him, but he was
those entrusted with its fortunes have the ability to do it. Among the officers reported as killed at the battle of Fredericksburg are Gen. Bayard, of the cavalry; Gen. Jackson, of the Pennsylvania Reserves; Col. Zinn, 132d Pennsylvania; Lt-Col. Dickinson, 4th U. S. artillery; Lt. Col. Curtis, 4th Rhode Island; Lt. Col. Sayles, 7th Rhode Island; Major Horgan, 88th New York: Capt. Kelly, 14th Indiana, and Capt Meagher, 7th New York. Amongst the wounded are the names of Gens. Vinton, Gibbon, Kimball, Caldwell, and Campbell none of them dangerously. Cols Sinclair, 5th Pa; N H Nugent, 69th N Y; Wiseman, 28th N J; Snyder, 7th Va; Miles, 61st N Y; Andrews, 1st Delaware; McGregor, 10th Mass; Hatch, 4th N J. Lt. Cols Geo Dane, 6th Pa; Goodman, 4th Ohio. Majors Goebel, 7th New York; C. C Knight, L19th Pennsylvania; Jennings, 26th New York; O'Nell, 63d New York. Bardwell, of Pennsylvania; Cavanaugh, 69th New York; Philbrook, 16th Massachuset is. Captains Cameroon, 9th New Y
H. W. Halleck (search for this): article 5
nthusiastic as previous to the last engagement. The Second report of Burnside. Headq's Army of the Potomac, December 16, 1862. 6 o'clock P. M. Major-General Halleck. The army was withdrawn to this side of the river because I felt the position in front could not be carried, and it was a military necessity either to atremptory directions from Washington, which domineered over his judgment and extorted his obedience. Whembe was ordered to Fredericksburg he had the promise of Gen. Halleck that this pontoons should meet him there Gen. Halleck forgot to give the order, and they were delayed so long that the enemy occupied the heights. In this emeGen. Halleck forgot to give the order, and they were delayed so long that the enemy occupied the heights. In this emergency a council of war was held; all the corps commanders opposed an advance; but Burnside said, in conclusion, that he was compelled to advance by orders from Washington. The reported wounding of Gen. Meagher is a mistake. His horse fell upon him, but he was only slightly injured, and is still in command of what remains of
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10