hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
McClellan 53 29 Browse Search
Lincoln 14 8 Browse Search
James T. Wilson 14 0 Browse Search
Burnside 14 2 Browse Search
Richmond (Virginia, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Chandler 10 8 Browse Search
Henderson 9 9 Browse Search
Davis 8 6 Browse Search
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 15, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 569 total hits in 267 results.

... 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 ...
July 2nd, 1862 AD (search for this): article 4
Notice. --I will pay a reward of $50 for the recovery, or any information which will lead to the recovery, of my slave Daniel, who was captured from the Yankees on the 2d of July, 1862. and brought to this city on a Government wagon sick. Said slave is of ginger-bread color, about 5 feet 8 inches high, and 21 years of age. C. C. Hansford, At office of Capt. Ch. Morris, A. Q. M., jy 15--1t* Corner 10th and Bank sts.
Notice. --I will pay a reward of $50 for the recovery, or any information which will lead to the recovery, of my slave Daniel, who was captured from the Yankees on the 2d of July, 1862. and brought to this city on a Government wagon sick. Said slave is of ginger-bread color, about 5 feet 8 inches high, and 21 years of age. C. C. Hansford, At office of Capt. Ch. Morris, A. Q. M., jy 15--1t* Corner 10th and Bank sts.
Charles Morris (search for this): article 4
Notice. --I will pay a reward of $50 for the recovery, or any information which will lead to the recovery, of my slave Daniel, who was captured from the Yankees on the 2d of July, 1862. and brought to this city on a Government wagon sick. Said slave is of ginger-bread color, about 5 feet 8 inches high, and 21 years of age. C. C. Hansford, At office of Capt. Ch. Morris, A. Q. M., jy 15--1t* Corner 10th and Bank sts.
C. C. Hansford (search for this): article 4
Notice. --I will pay a reward of $50 for the recovery, or any information which will lead to the recovery, of my slave Daniel, who was captured from the Yankees on the 2d of July, 1862. and brought to this city on a Government wagon sick. Said slave is of ginger-bread color, about 5 feet 8 inches high, and 21 years of age. C. C. Hansford, At office of Capt. Ch. Morris, A. Q. M., jy 15--1t* Corner 10th and Bank sts.
forces on Haley's term, near Battle Creek, two or three miles above Bridgeport, have increased to about five thousand, having a portion of cavalry and artillery. At Bridgeport they have one regiment and a half of cavalry: and of artillery: twelve small pieces. A large train of baggage wagons came in during the latter part of last week and a very large train of wagons, said by persons who have seen them, to number near four hundred, are coming from the direction of Florence and Huntsville. Buell is at Huntsville on his road to Stevenson and Bridgeport, and we may ere long, hear of something like war right here on the Tennessee river. Our forces are on the side of the river opposite the Yankees, and are anxious to see them on this side. The Yankees celebrated the 4th at Bridgeport and Battle Creek by a salute of thirty-four guns. On Saturday morning last a small party of Col. Davis's Florida troops went across the Tennessee, and, fording the Sequatchie on foot, surprised a
nine, and capturing five horses and guns, which they brought into camp. A party of five Yankees, who had paddled over to Long Island to gather berries, were also captured by our men. A Yankee Major, who had swam over after a boat, was captured by our pickets. The opposing pickets have ceased to fire at each other, and now exchange newspapers and civilities by swimming over. On last Thursday night the Yankees fiercely shelled our camp — without result, however. We understand from Capt. Guthrie, a Yankee Captain, that all the field officers of his regiment--19th Illinois--resigned a few days ago, and he thinks a draft by the Lincoln Government will be resisted in the U. S. Picayune Butler at-baton Rouge. Last Saturday morning, says the Jackson Mississippian, of the 6th, Picayune Butler visited the city of Baton Rouge, on board the steamer McClellan.--He left again Sunday. He immediately went to work, upon his arrival, arresting the citizens of that place. Hon. B
h, Picayune Butler visited the city of Baton Rouge, on board the steamer McClellan.--He left again Sunday. He immediately went to work, upon his arrival, arresting the citizens of that place. Hon. B. F. Bryan, the Mayor of the city, was called before him, and required to take the oath of allegiance or be consigned to Fort Jackson. Mr. Bryan very properly viewed the oath as not worth more than the paper it was written on, took it, and is now in our city on his way to Chattanooga to join Scott's cavalry regiment. Mr. R. has kindly furnished us a statement of the conversation which he had with the Picayune whose whole spite seemed to be directed against the guerrillas of Louisiana. He boasted that be would put down the guerrilla system of warfare — that be could do it in fifteen minutes, and this is the manner in which he proposes to crash the guerrillas. "What do you say, sir," says he, "to my ning a proclamation offering freedom and a thousand dollars to any negro who
Picayune Butler (search for this): article 4
esult, however. We understand from Capt. Guthrie, a Yankee Captain, that all the field officers of his regiment--19th Illinois--resigned a few days ago, and he thinks a draft by the Lincoln Government will be resisted in the U. S. Picayune Butler at-baton Rouge. Last Saturday morning, says the Jackson Mississippian, of the 6th, Picayune Butler visited the city of Baton Rouge, on board the steamer McClellan.--He left again Sunday. He immediately went to work, upon his arrivalPicayune Butler visited the city of Baton Rouge, on board the steamer McClellan.--He left again Sunday. He immediately went to work, upon his arrival, arresting the citizens of that place. Hon. B. F. Bryan, the Mayor of the city, was called before him, and required to take the oath of allegiance or be consigned to Fort Jackson. Mr. Bryan very properly viewed the oath as not worth more than the paper it was written on, took it, and is now in our city on his way to Chattanooga to join Scott's cavalry regiment. Mr. R. has kindly furnished us a statement of the conversation which he had with the Picayune whose whole spite seemed to be dir
en them, to number near four hundred, are coming from the direction of Florence and Huntsville. Buell is at Huntsville on his road to Stevenson and Bridgeport, and we may ere long, hear of something like war right here on the Tennessee river. Our forces are on the side of the river opposite the Yankees, and are anxious to see them on this side. The Yankees celebrated the 4th at Bridgeport and Battle Creek by a salute of thirty-four guns. On Saturday morning last a small party of Col. Davis's Florida troops went across the Tennessee, and, fording the Sequatchie on foot, surprised a scouting party of Yankee cavalry, numbering 27, taking five prisoners, killing and wounding nine, and capturing five horses and guns, which they brought into camp. A party of five Yankees, who had paddled over to Long Island to gather berries, were also captured by our men. A Yankee Major, who had swam over after a boat, was captured by our pickets. The opposing pickets have ceased to fire at eac
— that be could do it in fifteen minutes, and this is the manner in which he proposes to crash the guerrillas. "What do you say, sir," says he, "to my ning a proclamation offering freedom and a thousand dollars to any negro who will bring me in the head of a guerrilla. It is true, mistakes will happen, but what of that? Mistakes of that sort will occur. As, for instance, my men have wrongfully destroyed the property of one man, (George Keller,) but I mean to pay for that. As for Captain Budd's property, he was an officer in the Confederate army, and left his property where the guerrillas could get bold of it, and for that reason his men were perfectly justifiable in destroying it." He stated that the only chance for the Confederate cause was for foreign intervention. "But supposing France and England should interfere, we have already whipped England, and as for little Johnny Crapean, he can't whip the little Mexicans. But before these States should belong to any other
... 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 ...