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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 15, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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October, 7 AD (search for this): article 12
The bombardment of Hamilton, N. C. --The bombardment of the village of Hamilton, N. C., a defenceless village, was a most barbarous affair. The following telegram to the Raleigh Telegraph gives the fullest account we have seen: Weldon, July 10.--A courier has just arrived here, and states that seven or eight Yankee gunboats came up the Roanoke yesterday, and, without the slightest notice, opened a bombardment upon the town of Hamilton. The result of the grand attack was one infant killed on the part of the inhabitants. A portion of Capt. Whitakers cavalry was before them, resisted their landing, and succeeded in killing several. Yankees, with but two or three wounded amongst his men. The Yankees are now in possession of Hamilton — always an undefended place.
The bombardment of Hamilton, N. C. --The bombardment of the village of Hamilton, N. C., a defenceless village, was a most barbarous affair. The following telegram to the Raleigh Telegraph gives the fullest account we have seen: Weldon, July 10.--A courier has just arrived here, and states that seven or eight Yankee gunboats came up the Roanoke yesterday, and, without the slightest notice, opened a bombardment upon the town of Hamilton. The result of the grand attack was one infant killed on the part of the inhabitants. A portion of Capt. Whitakers cavalry was before them, resisted their landing, and succeeded in killing several. Yankees, with but two or three wounded amongst his men. The Yankees are now in possession of Hamilton — always an undefended place.
Hamilton, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 12
The bombardment of Hamilton, N. C. --The bombardment of the village of Hamilton, N. C., a defenceless village, was a most barbarous affair. The following telegram to the Raleigh Telegraph gives the fullest account we have seen: Weldon, July 10.--A courier has just arrived here, and states that seven or eight Yankee gunboats came up the Roanoke yesterday, and, without the slightest notice, opened a bombardment upon the town of Hamilton. The result of the grand attack was one infant Hamilton, N. C., a defenceless village, was a most barbarous affair. The following telegram to the Raleigh Telegraph gives the fullest account we have seen: Weldon, July 10.--A courier has just arrived here, and states that seven or eight Yankee gunboats came up the Roanoke yesterday, and, without the slightest notice, opened a bombardment upon the town of Hamilton. The result of the grand attack was one infant killed on the part of the inhabitants. A portion of Capt. Whitakers cavalry was before them, resisted their landing, and succeeded in killing several. Yankees, with but two or three wounded amongst his men. The Yankees are now in possession of Hamilton — always an undefended place.
Weldon, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 12
The bombardment of Hamilton, N. C. --The bombardment of the village of Hamilton, N. C., a defenceless village, was a most barbarous affair. The following telegram to the Raleigh Telegraph gives the fullest account we have seen: Weldon, July 10.--A courier has just arrived here, and states that seven or eight Yankee gunboats came up the Roanoke yesterday, and, without the slightest notice, opened a bombardment upon the town of Hamilton. The result of the grand attack was one infant killed on the part of the inhabitants. A portion of Capt. Whitakers cavalry was before them, resisted their landing, and succeeded in killing several. Yankees, with but two or three wounded amongst his men. The Yankees are now in possession of Hamilton — always an undefended place.
Hamilton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 12
The bombardment of Hamilton, N. C. --The bombardment of the village of Hamilton, N. C., a defenceless village, was a most barbarous affair. The following telegram to the Raleigh Telegraph gives the fullest account we have seen: Weldon, July 10.--A courier has just arrived here, and states that seven or eight Yankee gunboats came up the Roanoke yesterday, and, without the slightest notice, opened a bombardment upon the town of Hamilton. The result of the grand attack was one infant killed on the part of the inhabitants. A portion of Capt. Whitakers cavalry was before them, resisted their landing, and succeeded in killing several. Yankees, with but two or three wounded amongst his men. The Yankees are now in possession of Hamilton — always an undefended place.
--Yesterday Martha Morgan, arrested for keeping a disorderly house, was let off on condition that she moved her present residence.--Hiram, slave of Capt. J. Sheppard, charged with stealing G. McGee's horse, was acquitted, but detained for going at large. Two free negroes, named Wm. Maxwell and Joe Maxfield, were committed until the 16th--the first for stealing McGee's horse, the latter for receiving it. Case of Thomas Davenport, for a violent assault on Mrs. Kearn, was continued until the 18th inst. Pat. McSweoncy and Pat, Sullivan were sent to jail until the 16th, for the alleged offence of committing a rape on Mrs. Miller's servant woman. Jos. Allison, white, was fined $1 for behaving disorderly in the street while drunk. John Kearnan was temporarily committed for beating his wife. Sol slave of J. H. Gentry, arrested as a runaway, was returned to his owner. Sixteen free negroes, taken up as conscript nurses for the hospitals, appeared, and most of them offering valid excuses in
d for keeping a disorderly house, was let off on condition that she moved her present residence.--Hiram, slave of Capt. J. Sheppard, charged with stealing G. McGee's horse, was acquitted, but detained for going at large. Two free negroes, named Wm. Maxwell and Joe Maxfield, were committed until the 16th--the first for stealing McGee's horse, the latter for receiving it. Case of Thomas Davenport, for a violent assault on Mrs. Kearn, was continued until the 18th inst. Pat. McSweoncy and Pat, Sullivan were sent to jail until the 16th, for the alleged offence of committing a rape on Mrs. Miller's servant woman. Jos. Allison, white, was fined $1 for behaving disorderly in the street while drunk. John Kearnan was temporarily committed for beating his wife. Sol slave of J. H. Gentry, arrested as a runaway, was returned to his owner. Sixteen free negroes, taken up as conscript nurses for the hospitals, appeared, and most of them offering valid excuses in the shape of other legitimate empl
arrested for keeping a disorderly house, was let off on condition that she moved her present residence.--Hiram, slave of Capt. J. Sheppard, charged with stealing G. McGee's horse, was acquitted, but detained for going at large. Two free negroes, named Wm. Maxwell and Joe Maxfield, were committed until the 16th--the first for stealing McGee's horse, the latter for receiving it. Case of Thomas Davenport, for a violent assault on Mrs. Kearn, was continued until the 18th inst. Pat. McSweoncy and Pat, Sullivan were sent to jail until the 16th, for the alleged offence of committing a rape on Mrs. Miller's servant woman. Jos. Allison, white, was fined $1 for behaving disorderly in the street while drunk. John Kearnan was temporarily committed for beating his wife. Sol slave of J. H. Gentry, arrested as a runaway, was returned to his owner. Sixteen free negroes, taken up as conscript nurses for the hospitals, appeared, and most of them offering valid excuses in the shape of other legitim
Madison Miller (search for this): article 1
ce.--Hiram, slave of Capt. J. Sheppard, charged with stealing G. McGee's horse, was acquitted, but detained for going at large. Two free negroes, named Wm. Maxwell and Joe Maxfield, were committed until the 16th--the first for stealing McGee's horse, the latter for receiving it. Case of Thomas Davenport, for a violent assault on Mrs. Kearn, was continued until the 18th inst. Pat. McSweoncy and Pat, Sullivan were sent to jail until the 16th, for the alleged offence of committing a rape on Mrs. Miller's servant woman. Jos. Allison, white, was fined $1 for behaving disorderly in the street while drunk. John Kearnan was temporarily committed for beating his wife. Sol slave of J. H. Gentry, arrested as a runaway, was returned to his owner. Sixteen free negroes, taken up as conscript nurses for the hospitals, appeared, and most of them offering valid excuses in the shape of other legitimate employment, the raid made by the police did not amount to much. Sundry other trifling cases wer
e of Capt. J. Sheppard, charged with stealing G. McGee's horse, was acquitted, but detained for going at large. Two free negroes, named Wm. Maxwell and Joe Maxfield, were committed until the 16th--the first for stealing McGee's horse, the latter for receiving it. Case of Thomas Davenport, for a violent assault on Mrs. Kearn, was continued until the 18th inst. Pat. McSweoncy and Pat, Sullivan were sent to jail until the 16th, for the alleged offence of committing a rape on Mrs. Miller's servant woman. Jos. Allison, white, was fined $1 for behaving disorderly in the street while drunk. John Kearnan was temporarily committed for beating his wife. Sol slave of J. H. Gentry, arrested as a runaway, was returned to his owner. Sixteen free negroes, taken up as conscript nurses for the hospitals, appeared, and most of them offering valid excuses in the shape of other legitimate employment, the raid made by the police did not amount to much. Sundry other trifling cases were disposed of.
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