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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 15, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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c attention. The army of Halleck is said to have melted away, no less than that of Beauregard. It is a fact that the Federal have made no progress in Mississippi or Alabama since the evacuation of Corinth. The Generals of Halleck are scattered. Pope commands on the Shenandoah; Lewis Wallace demands a place in the army of the Potomac; the astronomer Mitchell is at Washington; McClernand is at Corinth; Cook, Nelson and Crittenden, entrenched between Huntsvile and Decatur, make no movement; Buell operates obscurely and fruitlessly in Last Tennessee; and Grant, almost without soldiers at Memphis, has not sufficient cavalry to prevent the marauders of the South from burning cotton within 20 miles of the town — that is to say, in his rear. The call for three hundred thousand men. The Governors of the States have responded to the call of Mr. Lincoln. Mr. Bradford, of Maryland says: "The North has no need to fill its ranks at the point of the bayonet like the South, by mean
McClellan (search for this): article 8
World, July 9] Richmond is in possession of the Confederates because General McClellan has not men enough — The people have decided opinions us to where the resthe rebellion. If they cannot be had in one way they must in another. Gen. McClellan must immediately be furnished with men enough to co-operate effectively witve days after the arrival of reinforcements at Harrison's Landing. Reinforce McClellan promptly and adequately, an no subsequent blundering in the War Department ca. Virginia.[from the Courrier des State Unis.] The presumed plans of McClellan are mildly discussed but people on in the dark for no one knows the project a conclusion. The long delay and extraordinary care in the operations of General McClellan were justified to the world only by the assertion that he meant to make sbroad, that the French Princes, who have for many months been attached to General McClellan's staff, have left the army, and return to Europe by the next steamer. T
Lewis Wallace (search for this): article 8
. He has but few at Manassas, and some soldiers in the Valley, who watch the movements of the Secessionist detachments left with Ewell by Jackson. The Southwest. Virginia does not entirely absorb public attention. The army of Halleck is said to have melted away, no less than that of Beauregard. It is a fact that the Federal have made no progress in Mississippi or Alabama since the evacuation of Corinth. The Generals of Halleck are scattered. Pope commands on the Shenandoah; Lewis Wallace demands a place in the army of the Potomac; the astronomer Mitchell is at Washington; McClernand is at Corinth; Cook, Nelson and Crittenden, entrenched between Huntsvile and Decatur, make no movement; Buell operates obscurely and fruitlessly in Last Tennessee; and Grant, almost without soldiers at Memphis, has not sufficient cavalry to prevent the marauders of the South from burning cotton within 20 miles of the town — that is to say, in his rear. The call for three hundred thousand
us attack. He has but few at Manassas, and some soldiers in the Valley, who watch the movements of the Secessionist detachments left with Ewell by Jackson. The Southwest. Virginia does not entirely absorb public attention. The army of Halleck is said to have melted away, no less than that of Beauregard. It is a fact that the Federal have made no progress in Mississippi or Alabama since the evacuation of Corinth. The Generals of Halleck are scattered. Pope commands on the ShenandoaHalleck are scattered. Pope commands on the Shenandoah; Lewis Wallace demands a place in the army of the Potomac; the astronomer Mitchell is at Washington; McClernand is at Corinth; Cook, Nelson and Crittenden, entrenched between Huntsvile and Decatur, make no movement; Buell operates obscurely and fruitlessly in Last Tennessee; and Grant, almost without soldiers at Memphis, has not sufficient cavalry to prevent the marauders of the South from burning cotton within 20 miles of the town — that is to say, in his rear. The call for three hundre
h has no need to fill its ranks at the point of the bayonet like the South, by means of an audacious conscription, and that its cause will not suffer such a tyranny. If such is the belief of Mr. Bradford, this does not seem to be the general opinion. Many papers indicate conscription as the only means of procuring sufficient soldiers. The need is in fact so pressing, and the eagerness to enlist so little marked, that many towns have voted a county in addition to that already allowed by Mr. Stanton. The municipal council of Buffalo has voted $75 per head, payable by the city to every new recruit. European intervention.[from the New York Post.] All the signs show that we stand at the grave and serious crisis of our history. The recent intimations from Europe look to speedy intervention in our affairs; and if the foreign Powers hesitate, it is not improbable that the news which the next steamer will take to England will help them to a conclusion. The long delay and extrao
o less than that of Beauregard. It is a fact that the Federal have made no progress in Mississippi or Alabama since the evacuation of Corinth. The Generals of Halleck are scattered. Pope commands on the Shenandoah; Lewis Wallace demands a place in the army of the Potomac; the astronomer Mitchell is at Washington; McClernand is at Corinth; Cook, Nelson and Crittenden, entrenched between Huntsvile and Decatur, make no movement; Buell operates obscurely and fruitlessly in Last Tennessee; and Grant, almost without soldiers at Memphis, has not sufficient cavalry to prevent the marauders of the South from burning cotton within 20 miles of the town — that is to say, in his rear. The call for three hundred thousand men. The Governors of the States have responded to the call of Mr. Lincoln. Mr. Bradford, of Maryland says: "The North has no need to fill its ranks at the point of the bayonet like the South, by means of an audacious conscription, and that its cause will not suff
avalry to prevent the marauders of the South from burning cotton within 20 miles of the town — that is to say, in his rear. The call for three hundred thousand men. The Governors of the States have responded to the call of Mr. Lincoln. Mr. Bradford, of Maryland says: "The North has no need to fill its ranks at the point of the bayonet like the South, by means of an audacious conscription, and that its cause will not suffer such a tyranny. If such is the belief of Mr. Bradford, thMr. Bradford, this does not seem to be the general opinion. Many papers indicate conscription as the only means of procuring sufficient soldiers. The need is in fact so pressing, and the eagerness to enlist so little marked, that many towns have voted a county in addition to that already allowed by Mr. Stanton. The municipal council of Buffalo has voted $75 per head, payable by the city to every new recruit. European intervention.[from the New York Post.] All the signs show that we stand at the gra
w the result of any conflict within a few hours after its occurrence. while we must wait a fortnight for any account of it but such as he chooses to give us. In short, the "Anaconda" is a blunder, a humbug, and a nuisance. Away with him! Mr Lincoln called upon to act.[from the New York World] What means this indecision at Washington? Why are the people kept in this suspense? Is there to be a change or not? The call for more troops has not yet kindled the first flash of enthusiasm. sufficient cavalry to prevent the marauders of the South from burning cotton within 20 miles of the town — that is to say, in his rear. The call for three hundred thousand men. The Governors of the States have responded to the call of Mr. Lincoln. Mr. Bradford, of Maryland says: "The North has no need to fill its ranks at the point of the bayonet like the South, by means of an audacious conscription, and that its cause will not suffer such a tyranny. If such is the belief of Mr
h Ewell by Jackson. The Southwest. Virginia does not entirely absorb public attention. The army of Halleck is said to have melted away, no less than that of Beauregard. It is a fact that the Federal have made no progress in Mississippi or Alabama since the evacuation of Corinth. The Generals of Halleck are scattered. Pope commands on the Shenandoah; Lewis Wallace demands a place in the army of the Potomac; the astronomer Mitchell is at Washington; McClernand is at Corinth; Cook, Nelson and Crittenden, entrenched between Huntsvile and Decatur, make no movement; Buell operates obscurely and fruitlessly in Last Tennessee; and Grant, almost without soldiers at Memphis, has not sufficient cavalry to prevent the marauders of the South from burning cotton within 20 miles of the town — that is to say, in his rear. The call for three hundred thousand men. The Governors of the States have responded to the call of Mr. Lincoln. Mr. Bradford, of Maryland says: "The North
eft with Ewell by Jackson. The Southwest. Virginia does not entirely absorb public attention. The army of Halleck is said to have melted away, no less than that of Beauregard. It is a fact that the Federal have made no progress in Mississippi or Alabama since the evacuation of Corinth. The Generals of Halleck are scattered. Pope commands on the Shenandoah; Lewis Wallace demands a place in the army of the Potomac; the astronomer Mitchell is at Washington; McClernand is at Corinth; Cook, Nelson and Crittenden, entrenched between Huntsvile and Decatur, make no movement; Buell operates obscurely and fruitlessly in Last Tennessee; and Grant, almost without soldiers at Memphis, has not sufficient cavalry to prevent the marauders of the South from burning cotton within 20 miles of the town — that is to say, in his rear. The call for three hundred thousand men. The Governors of the States have responded to the call of Mr. Lincoln. Mr. Bradford, of Maryland says: "Th
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