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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 8, 1863., [Electronic resource].

Found 365 total hits in 185 results.

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September 7th (search for this): article 1
rleston. evacuation of Morris Island — another demand for the surrender of Fort Sumter--Gen. Beauregard's reply — Furious bombardment. Charleston, Sept. 7. --The bombardment was kept up without intermission all day yesterday and far into the night. About one hundred and fifty of our men were killed and woundecontaining twelve men, was captured. The enemy now holds Cummings Point, in full view of the city. All quiet this morning. [Second Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7 --Noon.--A dispatch from Major Stephen Elliott, commanding at Fort Sumter, announces that a flag of truce, demanding the immediate surrender of that fort, hthat he can have Fort Sumter when he takes it and holds it, and that in the meantime such demands are puerile and unbecoming. [Third Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7--8 P. M. --At 6 o'clock P. M. the iron-clads and monitors approached Fort Sumter, closer than usual and opened a hot fire against it. Our batteries on Sulli
with success. We spiked the guns of Wagner and Gregg, and withdrew noiselessly in forty barges. Only one barge, containing twelve men, was captured. The enemy now holds Cummings Point, in full view of the city. All quiet this morning. [Second Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7 --Noon.--A dispatch from Major Stephen Elliott, commanding at Fort Sumter, announces that a flag of truce, demanding the immediate surrender of that fort, has just been received from Admiral Dahlgren by Lieut. Brown, of the steamer Palmetto State. Gen. Beauregard telegraphed to Major Elliott to reply to Dahlgren that he can have Fort Sumter when he takes it and holds it, and that in the meantime such demands are puerile and unbecoming. [Third Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7--8 P. M. --At 6 o'clock P. M. the iron-clads and monitors approached Fort Sumter, closer than usual and opened a hot fire against it. Our batteries on Sullivan's Island, including Fort Moultrie, replied heavily; t
g was repulsed before the enemy had completed their landing. Great havoc is supposed to have been played in enemy's boats by our grape and canister at dark. Yesterday afternoon, the enemy having advanced their sappers up to the very moat of Wagner, and it being impossible to hold the island longer, Gen. Beauregard ordered the evacuation, which was executed between 8 P. M. and 1 A. M., with success. We spiked the guns of Wagner and Gregg, and withdrew noiselessly in forty barges. Only oneWagner and Gregg, and withdrew noiselessly in forty barges. Only one barge, containing twelve men, was captured. The enemy now holds Cummings Point, in full view of the city. All quiet this morning. [Second Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7 --Noon.--A dispatch from Major Stephen Elliott, commanding at Fort Sumter, announces that a flag of truce, demanding the immediate surrender of that fort, has just been received from Admiral Dahlgren by Lieut. Brown, of the steamer Palmetto State. Gen. Beauregard telegraphed to Major Elliott to reply to Dahlg
Beauregard (search for this): article 1
From Charleston. evacuation of Morris Island — another demand for the surrender of Fort Sumter--Gen. Beauregard's reply — Furious bombardment. Charleston, Sept. 7. --The bombardment was kept up without intermission all day yesterday and far into the night. About one hundred and fifty of our men were killed r at dark. Yesterday afternoon, the enemy having advanced their sappers up to the very moat of Wagner, and it being impossible to hold the island longer, Gen. Beauregard ordered the evacuation, which was executed between 8 P. M. and 1 A. M., with success. We spiked the guns of Wagner and Gregg, and withdrew noiselessly in forag of truce, demanding the immediate surrender of that fort, has just been received from Admiral Dahlgren by Lieut. Brown, of the steamer Palmetto State. Gen. Beauregard telegraphed to Major Elliott to reply to Dahlgren that he can have Fort Sumter when he takes it and holds it, and that in the meantime such demands are pueril
Stephen Elliott (search for this): article 1
ly in forty barges. Only one barge, containing twelve men, was captured. The enemy now holds Cummings Point, in full view of the city. All quiet this morning. [Second Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7 --Noon.--A dispatch from Major Stephen Elliott, commanding at Fort Sumter, announces that a flag of truce, demanding the immediate surrender of that fort, has just been received from Admiral Dahlgren by Lieut. Brown, of the steamer Palmetto State. Gen. Beauregard telegraphed to Mto State. Gen. Beauregard telegraphed to Major Elliott to reply to Dahlgren that he can have Fort Sumter when he takes it and holds it, and that in the meantime such demands are puerile and unbecoming. [Third Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7--8 P. M. --At 6 o'clock P. M. the iron-clads and monitors approached Fort Sumter, closer than usual and opened a hot fire against it. Our batteries on Sullivan's Island, including Fort Moultrie, replied heavily; the firing still going on.
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
From Charleston. evacuation of Morris Island — another demand for the surrender of Fort Sumter--Gen. Beauregard's reply — Furious bombardment. Charleston, Sept. 7. --The bombardment was kept up without intermission all day yesterday and far into the night. About one hundred and fifty of our men were killed and wounded at batteries Wagner and Gregg. The attempt to assault Gregg was repulsed before the enemy had completed their landing. Great havoc is supposed to have been played in enemy's boats by our grape and canister at dark. Yesterday afternoon, the enemy having advanced their sappers up to the very moat of Wagner, and it being impossible to hold the island longer, Gen. Beauregard ordered the evacuation, which was executed between 8 P. M. and 1 A. M., with success. We spiked the guns of Wagner and Gregg, and withdrew noiselessly in forty barges. Only one barge, containing twelve men, was captured. The enemy now holds Cummings Point, in full v
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
guns of Wagner and Gregg, and withdrew noiselessly in forty barges. Only one barge, containing twelve men, was captured. The enemy now holds Cummings Point, in full view of the city. All quiet this morning. [Second Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7 --Noon.--A dispatch from Major Stephen Elliott, commanding at Fort Sumter, announces that a flag of truce, demanding the immediate surrender of that fort, has just been received from Admiral Dahlgren by Lieut. Brown, of the steamer Palmetto State. Gen. Beauregard telegraphed to Major Elliott to reply to Dahlgren that he can have Fort Sumter when he takes it and holds it, and that in the meantime such demands are puerile and unbecoming. [Third Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7--8 P. M. --At 6 o'clock P. M. the iron-clads and monitors approached Fort Sumter, closer than usual and opened a hot fire against it. Our batteries on Sullivan's Island, including Fort Moultrie, replied heavily; the firing still going on.
Sullivan's Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
guns of Wagner and Gregg, and withdrew noiselessly in forty barges. Only one barge, containing twelve men, was captured. The enemy now holds Cummings Point, in full view of the city. All quiet this morning. [Second Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7 --Noon.--A dispatch from Major Stephen Elliott, commanding at Fort Sumter, announces that a flag of truce, demanding the immediate surrender of that fort, has just been received from Admiral Dahlgren by Lieut. Brown, of the steamer Palmetto State. Gen. Beauregard telegraphed to Major Elliott to reply to Dahlgren that he can have Fort Sumter when he takes it and holds it, and that in the meantime such demands are puerile and unbecoming. [Third Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7--8 P. M. --At 6 o'clock P. M. the iron-clads and monitors approached Fort Sumter, closer than usual and opened a hot fire against it. Our batteries on Sullivan's Island, including Fort Moultrie, replied heavily; the firing still going on.
August 17th (search for this): article 1
Fifty dollars reward. --Runaway from our farm, in Nelson county, on the 17th of August, a negro woman named Eliza. She is about 23 years old, likely, black, and above the average size. She is originally from North Carolina, was purchased by us in Richmond, and lived with one of us a short time at Madison Court House. She was apprehended and made her escape from Mr. Thomas Marrin's, on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, near Covesville, Albemarle county, last week, and is doubtless making her way towards Gordonsville or Richmond, or the Yankee lines. $50 will be given for her apprehension and delivery to us, or $30 of secured in jail so that we get her. Address Madison Court-House or Howardsville. Z. R. Lewis. D. J. Harisock. A. R. Blakey se 8--10t
A. R. Blakey (search for this): article 1
Fifty dollars reward. --Runaway from our farm, in Nelson county, on the 17th of August, a negro woman named Eliza. She is about 23 years old, likely, black, and above the average size. She is originally from North Carolina, was purchased by us in Richmond, and lived with one of us a short time at Madison Court House. She was apprehended and made her escape from Mr. Thomas Marrin's, on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, near Covesville, Albemarle county, last week, and is doubtless making her way towards Gordonsville or Richmond, or the Yankee lines. $50 will be given for her apprehension and delivery to us, or $30 of secured in jail so that we get her. Address Madison Court-House or Howardsville. Z. R. Lewis. D. J. Harisock. A. R. Blakey se 8--10t
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