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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 8, 1863., [Electronic resource].

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with success. We spiked the guns of Wagner and Gregg, and withdrew noiselessly in forty barges. Only one barge, containing twelve men, was captured. The enemy now holds Cummings Point, in full view of the city. All quiet this morning. [Second Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7 --Noon.--A dispatch from Major Stephen Elliott, commanding at Fort Sumter, announces that a flag of truce, demanding the immediate surrender of that fort, has just been received from Admiral Dahlgren by Lieut. Brown, of the steamer Palmetto State. Gen. Beauregard telegraphed to Major Elliott to reply to Dahlgren that he can have Fort Sumter when he takes it and holds it, and that in the meantime such demands are puerile and unbecoming. [Third Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7--8 P. M. --At 6 o'clock P. M. the iron-clads and monitors approached Fort Sumter, closer than usual and opened a hot fire against it. Our batteries on Sullivan's Island, including Fort Moultrie, replied heavily; t
g was repulsed before the enemy had completed their landing. Great havoc is supposed to have been played in enemy's boats by our grape and canister at dark. Yesterday afternoon, the enemy having advanced their sappers up to the very moat of Wagner, and it being impossible to hold the island longer, Gen. Beauregard ordered the evacuation, which was executed between 8 P. M. and 1 A. M., with success. We spiked the guns of Wagner and Gregg, and withdrew noiselessly in forty barges. Only oneWagner and Gregg, and withdrew noiselessly in forty barges. Only one barge, containing twelve men, was captured. The enemy now holds Cummings Point, in full view of the city. All quiet this morning. [Second Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7 --Noon.--A dispatch from Major Stephen Elliott, commanding at Fort Sumter, announces that a flag of truce, demanding the immediate surrender of that fort, has just been received from Admiral Dahlgren by Lieut. Brown, of the steamer Palmetto State. Gen. Beauregard telegraphed to Major Elliott to reply to Dahlg
Beauregard (search for this): article 1
From Charleston. evacuation of Morris Island — another demand for the surrender of Fort Sumter--Gen. Beauregard's reply — Furious bombardment. Charleston, Sept. 7. --The bombardment was kept up without intermission all day yesterday and far into the night. About one hundred and fifty of our men were killed r at dark. Yesterday afternoon, the enemy having advanced their sappers up to the very moat of Wagner, and it being impossible to hold the island longer, Gen. Beauregard ordered the evacuation, which was executed between 8 P. M. and 1 A. M., with success. We spiked the guns of Wagner and Gregg, and withdrew noiselessly in forag of truce, demanding the immediate surrender of that fort, has just been received from Admiral Dahlgren by Lieut. Brown, of the steamer Palmetto State. Gen. Beauregard telegraphed to Major Elliott to reply to Dahlgren that he can have Fort Sumter when he takes it and holds it, and that in the meantime such demands are pueril
Stephen Elliott (search for this): article 1
ly in forty barges. Only one barge, containing twelve men, was captured. The enemy now holds Cummings Point, in full view of the city. All quiet this morning. [Second Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7 --Noon.--A dispatch from Major Stephen Elliott, commanding at Fort Sumter, announces that a flag of truce, demanding the immediate surrender of that fort, has just been received from Admiral Dahlgren by Lieut. Brown, of the steamer Palmetto State. Gen. Beauregard telegraphed to Mto State. Gen. Beauregard telegraphed to Major Elliott to reply to Dahlgren that he can have Fort Sumter when he takes it and holds it, and that in the meantime such demands are puerile and unbecoming. [Third Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7--8 P. M. --At 6 o'clock P. M. the iron-clads and monitors approached Fort Sumter, closer than usual and opened a hot fire against it. Our batteries on Sullivan's Island, including Fort Moultrie, replied heavily; the firing still going on.
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
From Charleston. evacuation of Morris Island — another demand for the surrender of Fort Sumter--Gen. Beauregard's reply — Furious bombardment. Charleston, Sept. 7. --The bombardment was kept up without intermission all day yesterday and far into the night. About one hundred and fifty of our men were killed and wounded at batteries Wagner and Gregg. The attempt to assault Gregg was repulsed before the enemy had completed their landing. Great havoc is supposed to have been played in enemy's boats by our grape and canister at dark. Yesterday afternoon, the enemy having advanced their sappers up to the very moat of Wagner, and it being impossible to hold the island longer, Gen. Beauregard ordered the evacuation, which was executed between 8 P. M. and 1 A. M., with success. We spiked the guns of Wagner and Gregg, and withdrew noiselessly in forty barges. Only one barge, containing twelve men, was captured. The enemy now holds Cummings Point, in full v
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
guns of Wagner and Gregg, and withdrew noiselessly in forty barges. Only one barge, containing twelve men, was captured. The enemy now holds Cummings Point, in full view of the city. All quiet this morning. [Second Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7 --Noon.--A dispatch from Major Stephen Elliott, commanding at Fort Sumter, announces that a flag of truce, demanding the immediate surrender of that fort, has just been received from Admiral Dahlgren by Lieut. Brown, of the steamer Palmetto State. Gen. Beauregard telegraphed to Major Elliott to reply to Dahlgren that he can have Fort Sumter when he takes it and holds it, and that in the meantime such demands are puerile and unbecoming. [Third Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7--8 P. M. --At 6 o'clock P. M. the iron-clads and monitors approached Fort Sumter, closer than usual and opened a hot fire against it. Our batteries on Sullivan's Island, including Fort Moultrie, replied heavily; the firing still going on.
Sullivan's Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
guns of Wagner and Gregg, and withdrew noiselessly in forty barges. Only one barge, containing twelve men, was captured. The enemy now holds Cummings Point, in full view of the city. All quiet this morning. [Second Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7 --Noon.--A dispatch from Major Stephen Elliott, commanding at Fort Sumter, announces that a flag of truce, demanding the immediate surrender of that fort, has just been received from Admiral Dahlgren by Lieut. Brown, of the steamer Palmetto State. Gen. Beauregard telegraphed to Major Elliott to reply to Dahlgren that he can have Fort Sumter when he takes it and holds it, and that in the meantime such demands are puerile and unbecoming. [Third Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 7--8 P. M. --At 6 o'clock P. M. the iron-clads and monitors approached Fort Sumter, closer than usual and opened a hot fire against it. Our batteries on Sullivan's Island, including Fort Moultrie, replied heavily; the firing still going on.
Rosecrans (search for this): article 2
From Tennessee. Chattanooga, Sept. 6. --With the exception of a few shells thrown at our pontoons yesterday, nothing occurred to break the monotony at this place. The enemy seems quite active, both above and below the place, but there is no further indication of an attack. The best informed persons think that no attack will be made here, but an effort will be made to flank us. Two privates, four regulars, and one of Rosecrans's telegraph operators were captured yesterday near Running Water Bridge. Atlanta, Sept. 7.--Passengers from Chattanooga report a force of the enemy at Waxahachie — number not stated.--We learn from Rome that another force is advancing on that point. All accounts concur in stating that the feeling and disposition of the army is one of great desire to meet the enemy, and confidence in the result. From East Tennessee no recent movement to report.
September 6th (search for this): article 2
From Tennessee. Chattanooga, Sept. 6. --With the exception of a few shells thrown at our pontoons yesterday, nothing occurred to break the monotony at this place. The enemy seems quite active, both above and below the place, but there is no further indication of an attack. The best informed persons think that no attack will be made here, but an effort will be made to flank us. Two privates, four regulars, and one of Rosecrans's telegraph operators were captured yesterday near Running Water Bridge. Atlanta, Sept. 7.--Passengers from Chattanooga report a force of the enemy at Waxahachie — number not stated.--We learn from Rome that another force is advancing on that point. All accounts concur in stating that the feeling and disposition of the army is one of great desire to meet the enemy, and confidence in the result. From East Tennessee no recent movement to report.
July, 9 AD (search for this): article 2
From Tennessee. Chattanooga, Sept. 6. --With the exception of a few shells thrown at our pontoons yesterday, nothing occurred to break the monotony at this place. The enemy seems quite active, both above and below the place, but there is no further indication of an attack. The best informed persons think that no attack will be made here, but an effort will be made to flank us. Two privates, four regulars, and one of Rosecrans's telegraph operators were captured yesterday near Running Water Bridge. Atlanta, Sept. 7.--Passengers from Chattanooga report a force of the enemy at Waxahachie — number not stated.--We learn from Rome that another force is advancing on that point. All accounts concur in stating that the feeling and disposition of the army is one of great desire to meet the enemy, and confidence in the result. From East Tennessee no recent movement to report.
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