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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 8, 1863., [Electronic resource].

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asure in saying that under the present Superintendent the discipline and management is greatly improved. I have heretofore submitted various recommendations in my communications to the two Houses; and without repeating those recommendation I will content myself with calling attention to them. They are accessible to all having been published in the documents of the past three years. In this connection, I also invite your attention to the very able report on this subject prepared by Commissioners Haymond, Johnston, and Campbell. This report contains recommendations and suggestions of much value and importance, and I commend them to your favorable consideration. This is a matter of practical importance, and requires early attention. The interests of the State demand that the reforming hand of the Legislature should be applied to it.--With a regular supply of raw material, so as to keep the convicts constantly employed, and with an intelligent and judicious application of their
A. W. Richardson (search for this): article 1
r horrible they might be. Her people have never quailed — nor have they murmured under the repeated wrongs and aggressions they have suffered. She was not the first to enter this struggle, nor will she be the first to sue for peace, unless that peace shall be accompanied by an unqualified recognition of the independence of the Southern Confederacy. The report of the Adjutant General, accompanied by a bill, is herewith submitted, and to it your attention is respectfully invited. General Richardson's intelligence and experience in all military matters entitle his views to great respect, and I confidently commend them to your favorable consideration. The General Assembly, at its last session, prescribed that no Confederate issues of a date anterior to April 6th, 1863 should be received in payment of State taxes. I am unable to comprehend either the wisdom or policy of this legislation. It is calculated to impair confidence in the currency of the Confederate Government, and,
S. V. Johnston (search for this): article 1
that under the present Superintendent the discipline and management is greatly improved. I have heretofore submitted various recommendations in my communications to the two Houses; and without repeating those recommendation I will content myself with calling attention to them. They are accessible to all having been published in the documents of the past three years. In this connection, I also invite your attention to the very able report on this subject prepared by Commissioners Haymond, Johnston, and Campbell. This report contains recommendations and suggestions of much value and importance, and I commend them to your favorable consideration. This is a matter of practical importance, and requires early attention. The interests of the State demand that the reforming hand of the Legislature should be applied to it.--With a regular supply of raw material, so as to keep the convicts constantly employed, and with an intelligent and judicious application of their labor, we may rea
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
horities and not return to their owners, or be seized, or killed by the public enemy, or may, by want of due diligence on the part of the authorities of the Confederate States, in any manner be lost to the owners of such slaves; and in like manner compensation shall be made for any injury to slaves arising from the want of due diligence on the part of the authorities of the Confederate States."Many cases of peculiar hardship, arising from the loss of slaves, have been brought to my attention, and much complaint has been made by the owners, in consequence of the fact that they have not received the value as provided for in this act. In several cases the onlnent debt of the State is reported to be$34,399.850.30 This sent includes ruter est on the public debt uncalled for the greater portion of which is due to the United States and her citizens$2,730.894.01 it includes, also, the sum borrowed by us to aid in the prevention of the war, and which, by agreement, is to be refounded by th
Orange Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ly taxed to meet them. So far they have fully met the demands, but it is apparent to any person that will pass over them that extensive repairs are now much needed, and must be made, or they will be broken down and rendered useless. Besides great difficulty is experienced in procuring cross ties and the necessary supply of wood for fuel. Labor is indispensably necessary to relieve them, and so far as legislation can aid them I am satisfied it will be cheerfully extended. The Central, Orange and Alexandria, are the Virginia and Tennessee roads have more to apprehend from raids than any of the other roads in the State, and this apprehension makes it difficult to procure labor on reasonable, or indeed on any terms. The owners of slaves are unwilling to hire them on these lines, lost they may be seized and carried off, or may be induced to abscond.--Under these circumstances they very properly desire that the subject shall be brought to your attention. The papers are herewith sub
Brunswick, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): article 1
nvite your attention to the draft made upon the several counties. The apportionment upon the counties seems to be entirely arbitrary, and bears very unequally. In some cases five per cent. of the slaves is called for, and in other cases less than one per cent. Thus, Amelia, with upwards of 7,000 slaves assessed with taxes in 1862, is required to furnish 50, while Alleghany, with less than 700, is required to furnish 30. The county of Albemarle, with 12,681, is called upon for 200, while Brunswick, with 9,212, is called upon for 250. The county of Augusta, with 4,460 is called upon for 80, while the county of Rockingham, with 2,164 is called upon for 100. Hanover, with 8,621, is called upon for 80, while Prince Edward, with 6,998, is called upon for 150. These examples will suffice to show how unequally this burden is distributed; and I trust that some amendment will be made to the law, which will afford protection against such inequality. The law requires that "the value of
Albemarle (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ewith submitted to your consideration, and I particularly invite your attention to the draft made upon the several counties. The apportionment upon the counties seems to be entirely arbitrary, and bears very unequally. In some cases five per cent. of the slaves is called for, and in other cases less than one per cent. Thus, Amelia, with upwards of 7,000 slaves assessed with taxes in 1862, is required to furnish 50, while Alleghany, with less than 700, is required to furnish 30. The county of Albemarle, with 12,681, is called upon for 200, while Brunswick, with 9,212, is called upon for 250. The county of Augusta, with 4,460 is called upon for 80, while the county of Rockingham, with 2,164 is called upon for 100. Hanover, with 8,621, is called upon for 80, while Prince Edward, with 6,998, is called upon for 150. These examples will suffice to show how unequally this burden is distributed; and I trust that some amendment will be made to the law, which will afford protection agains
Augusta county (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
counties. The apportionment upon the counties seems to be entirely arbitrary, and bears very unequally. In some cases five per cent. of the slaves is called for, and in other cases less than one per cent. Thus, Amelia, with upwards of 7,000 slaves assessed with taxes in 1862, is required to furnish 50, while Alleghany, with less than 700, is required to furnish 30. The county of Albemarle, with 12,681, is called upon for 200, while Brunswick, with 9,212, is called upon for 250. The county of Augusta, with 4,460 is called upon for 80, while the county of Rockingham, with 2,164 is called upon for 100. Hanover, with 8,621, is called upon for 80, while Prince Edward, with 6,998, is called upon for 150. These examples will suffice to show how unequally this burden is distributed; and I trust that some amendment will be made to the law, which will afford protection against such inequality. The law requires that "the value of such slaves as may escape from the Confederate authorit
Rockingham (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
rbitrary, and bears very unequally. In some cases five per cent. of the slaves is called for, and in other cases less than one per cent. Thus, Amelia, with upwards of 7,000 slaves assessed with taxes in 1862, is required to furnish 50, while Alleghany, with less than 700, is required to furnish 30. The county of Albemarle, with 12,681, is called upon for 200, while Brunswick, with 9,212, is called upon for 250. The county of Augusta, with 4,460 is called upon for 80, while the county of Rockingham, with 2,164 is called upon for 100. Hanover, with 8,621, is called upon for 80, while Prince Edward, with 6,998, is called upon for 150. These examples will suffice to show how unequally this burden is distributed; and I trust that some amendment will be made to the law, which will afford protection against such inequality. The law requires that "the value of such slaves as may escape from the Confederate authorities and not return to their owners, or be seized, or killed by the pub
Amelia Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ay of August last a requisition was made upon me by the Secretary of War for 5,340 slaves, to work upon the fortifications around Richmond. Copies of the papers are herewith submitted to your consideration, and I particularly invite your attention to the draft made upon the several counties. The apportionment upon the counties seems to be entirely arbitrary, and bears very unequally. In some cases five per cent. of the slaves is called for, and in other cases less than one per cent. Thus, Amelia, with upwards of 7,000 slaves assessed with taxes in 1862, is required to furnish 50, while Alleghany, with less than 700, is required to furnish 30. The county of Albemarle, with 12,681, is called upon for 200, while Brunswick, with 9,212, is called upon for 250. The county of Augusta, with 4,460 is called upon for 80, while the county of Rockingham, with 2,164 is called upon for 100. Hanover, with 8,621, is called upon for 80, while Prince Edward, with 6,998, is called upon for 150. Th
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