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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 9, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 8
Senator Pomeroy and his committee against Abraham Lincoln as a candidate for another term, and in fble withal to the belligerents. Not one of Mr. Lincoln's predecessors, excepting, perhaps, that imln committee have given a fair warning that Mr. Lincoln cannot be re-elected; that if nominated cer, the radical Chase faction will not accept Mr. Lincoln as their candidate, but will combine with hday closed its proceedings with a set of anti Lincoln resolutions. Wendell Phillips and his Abolit Thurlow Weed, try the experiment of a set of Lincoln nominating resolutions in the New York Legislim as a candidate for another term. President Lincoln has had some show of strength from varioherefore, after the vote of confidence in Abraham Lincoln given by the Pennsylvania Legislature, th running the The resent action of one of Lincoln's in Norfolk in taking charge of the churchelined. I will not have control of any church on any side. Yours, respectfully, A. Lincoln. [1 more...]
Pickering (search for this): article 8
d the ship sunk rapidly in less than eight minutes from the time the torpedo machine was first seen. The vessel sunk in six of water. As she began to sink the most frightful science were witnessed. Men with nothing but their shirts on were seen struggling in the water, officers were trying to get the boats while others were mounting the rigging. Three beats were finally unlashed, and these were sent to rescue those in the water. The at once started for the Canandaigua, carrying Captain Pickering, who was badly injured, but is how doing well. As soon as Captain Greene, of the Canandaigua, get the news, he at once hoisted signals of distress and come to our assistance, and in three hours after the attack on the Housatonic all hands that were saved were safely transferred to that ship, where they received every attention. Subsequently a portion of the survivors were transferred to the Wabash. The Gousatonic is a total loss. All hands lost all they possessed — money, c
to our assistance, and in three hours after the attack on the Housatonic all hands that were saved were safely transferred to that ship, where they received every attention. Subsequently a portion of the survivors were transferred to the Wabash. The Gousatonic is a total loss. All hands lost all they possessed — money, clothes, &c. In fact many of them, including some of the officers, went on board of the Canandaigua in a naked state. A sad accident of the disaster in the loss of Ensign Hazleton, of Concord, New Hampshire; Mr. Mezzey, Captain's Clerk; John Williams, Quartermaster, and John Welsh, coal-heaver, of Boston, were drowned. The latter had got safely on the deck, but ventured back to save $900, which he had in his bag on the berth deck. Poer fellow, he never returned. Theo Parker, (colored,) who was on the lookout directly over where the ship was struck, was blown late the air and instantly killed. Capt. Pickerang was slightly injured by the explosion. John Goff,
I only quote that part of my letter which relates to the church. It is as follows: "But I must add that the United Stated Government must not, as by this order, undertake to run the churches. When an individual, in a church or out of it, becomes dangerous to the public interest, he must be checked, but the churches, as such, must take care of themselves. It will not do for the United States to appoint trustees, supervisors, or other agents, for the churches." This letter going to General Carlis, then in command, I supposed, of course, it was obeyed, especially as I heard no further complaint from Dr. Mc or his friends for nearly an entire year. I have never interfered, not thought of interfering, as to who shall or shall not preach in any church; nor have I knowingly or be livingly intreated any one else so to interferes by any authority. If any one is so interfering by color of my authority, I would like to have it specifically made known to me. If, after all, what is n
Nathan Rauney (search for this): article 8
. Many of the survivors had quite large some of money laid away to send home by the next mail. The loss to them is severe. Lincoln on running the The resent action of one of Lincoln's in Norfolk in taking charge of the churches there gives the following letter some interest: Executive Mansion, Washington, December 23, 1863. I have just looked over a petition signed by some three dozen citizens of St. Louis and their accompanying letter, one by yourself, one by a Mr. Nathan Rauney, and by a Mr. John D. Cealter--the whole relating to the Rev. Dr. McPhesters. The petition prays in the came of justices and mercy, that will restore Dr. McPhesters to all his rights. This gives no intimation as to what eccississtical rights are withdrawn. Your letter states that Provost Marshal Dick, about a year ago, ordered the arrest of Dr. McPhesters, pastor of the Vine Street Church prohibited him from officiating, and placed the management of the affairs of the church o
January 2nd (search for this): article 8
s letter, asks; "Is it not a strange, illustration of the condition of things that the question of who shall be allowed to preach in a church in St. Louis shall be decided by the President of the United States!" Now, all this sounds very strangely, and, wish, a little as if you gentlemen, making the application, do not understand the case alike, one affirming that his Doctor is enjoying all the rights of a civilian, and another pointing out to me what will secure the release! On the 2d of January last I wrote to Gen. Curtis in relation to Mr. Disk's order upon Dr. McPhesters, and, as I suppose, the Doctor is enjoying all the rights of a civilian, I only quote that part of my letter which relates to the church. It is as follows: "But I must add that the United Stated Government must not, as by this order, undertake to run the churches. When an individual, in a church or out of it, becomes dangerous to the public interest, he must be checked, but the churches, as such, must take
dent to touch the independent mashes of the people their true line of action. The field in open and the course is clear for the election of General Grant as the people's candidate, and it will require only a little initiatory public here and there to secure for him the inside track. Let the ball be put in motion, and it will seen gain a mountain which will carry everything before it. The destruction of the off Charleston. A letter in the Boston Herald, from off Charleston, the 18th ult., gives an account of the blowing up of the corvette by a Confederates torpedo steamer. The event took places about o'clock on one of the coldest nights of the winter. The letter says: A long object, just on the edge of the water, was discovered astern of the ship. In an the cable was slipped, the alarm sounded, and all hands beat to quarters, but before the ship had made any head way the torpedo exploded under has starboard quarter, making a most frightful report. The propelle
December 23rd, 1863 AD (search for this): article 8
es and the paymaster's safe will be recovered. She cannot be raised, as her stern is completely blown off, She was with coal and provisions, which will be a loss. Many of the survivors had quite large some of money laid away to send home by the next mail. The loss to them is severe. Lincoln on running the The resent action of one of Lincoln's in Norfolk in taking charge of the churches there gives the following letter some interest: Executive Mansion, Washington, December 23, 1863. I have just looked over a petition signed by some three dozen citizens of St. Louis and their accompanying letter, one by yourself, one by a Mr. Nathan Rauney, and by a Mr. John D. Cealter--the whole relating to the Rev. Dr. McPhesters. The petition prays in the came of justices and mercy, that will restore Dr. McPhesters to all his rights. This gives no intimation as to what eccississtical rights are withdrawn. Your letter states that Provost Marshal Dick, about a year
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