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Longstreet (search for this): article 1
ind in Lee a more formidable antagonist than he has ever met at the Southwest. An expected rebel invasion of Kentucky. There is a wide spread apprehension in the West that the Confederates are about invading Kentucky again. A telegram from Cincinnati says: The idea that Gen. Breckinridge is advancing upon the Kentucky line, with the intention of raising the country in insurrection, adds a great deal to the excitement of the people. A few days ago a rumor was spread that Gen. Longstreet had sent away most of his artillery and wagons by railroad, and that he was marching upon Cumberland Gap. at the head of thirty thousand men. When this news reached Kentucky most of the farmers in Harland, Letcher, Knox, and other adjoining counties, left their farms and took the way of Manchester. The idea of an invasion of the State by the rebels is now a fixed opinion, and not an hour elapses without some rumors of their advance being circulated among the inhabitants. A gentl
tchell, of the 54th regiment, was badly wounded; Oliver Sales was killed; James Goodrich Wm. Hart, T. C. Jeffreys, and several soldiers belonging to the 54th, were wounded severely. The 54th regiment arrived in the afternoon, and formed on the square. Nelson Welts, the man who fired the first shot, was instantly killed. John Cooper, a prisoner, was shot while trying to escape. Col. Brooks, with a squad of men, went in pursuit of the gang of Copperheads about seven miles. Capt. Williams has some twenty prominent secesh implicated in the affair under guard at the Court House Col. Mitchell had a conference with the Hon. O. B. Franklin and Judge Constable, who seemed very anxious that steps should be taken to prevent a further outbreak. Chicago, March 30, 1864.--A dispatch dated Mattoon, Ill., last night, says: Four hundred men of the 54th Illinois regiment leave Charleston to night to attack the rebels, who are said to be three hundred strong, under the command
rtions of those States, and but a few miles distant from each other: St. Louis, Tuesday, March 29, 1864. --A special dispatch to the Democrat, from Charleston, Coles co says the Copperheads came into that town to attend Court yesterday, with guns concealed in their wagons and armed with pistols. Some soldiers in the Court-House yard were drawn into an affray, and a general fight occurred. The County Sheriff sprang from the Judge's stand and commenced firing a pistol at Union men Major York, surgeon of the 54th, was one of the first victims. The Union men, being outnumbered at the Court House, ran to the houses and stores for arms. They were fired upon from the windows. Ten or twelve were wounded. Col. Mitchell, of the 54th regiment, was badly wounded; Oliver Sales was killed; James Goodrich Wm. Hart, T. C. Jeffreys, and several soldiers belonging to the 54th, were wounded severely. The 54th regiment arrived in the afternoon, and formed on the square. Nelson Wel
d just come from Richmond, in company of E. M. Bruce, G. W. Ewing, T. L. Burnett, and other rebel Kentuckian. He was also told that these gentlemen had come for the purpose of preparing the people for the approaching arrival of Breckinridge and Buckner. The Louisville Journal of the 18th, in speaking of the expected rebel raid into Kentucky, says that not a few Kentucky rebels in the South have written within a short time to their rebel relations, friends, and sympathizers at home, to seleping away everything of value and leaving her stripped and desolate. The Journal considers that the main purpose of Breckinridge's movement into Western Virginia is an evasion of Kentucky, and that there is no doubt that a powerful force under Buckner or Presion, or both, strengthened by John Morgan's, Forrest's, and Champ Ferguson's cavalry, will co-operate with him in the invasion. Commercial and Financial. Gold opened in New York Wednesday with some degree of activity at 165; but
e Chicago Journal, says "that quite a number of our Western troops are to be immediately transferred to the Eastern theatre of war. The Northwestern soldiers will, it is likely, help to take Richmond." At Memphis, a few days ago, a block of twenty buildings used for storing commissary goods, fell in, burying in the ruins a large number of persons. Four women, more or less wounded, and twelve children had been dog out. A Nashville dispatch, of Tuesday, says that the friends of Governor Johnson confidently expect his nomination by the Republican Convention as Vice President on the ticket with President Lincoln. Incendiaries thrive in Vicksburg. There have been many fires recently; several Government stores have been burned, and the railroad depot and adjoining buildings set on fire. Cents hereafter coined will be composed of ninety-five per centum of copper and five per centum of tin or zinc. Elisha R. Potter is the nominee of the Democratic State Convention fo
eatre of war. The Northwestern soldiers will, it is likely, help to take Richmond." At Memphis, a few days ago, a block of twenty buildings used for storing commissary goods, fell in, burying in the ruins a large number of persons. Four women, more or less wounded, and twelve children had been dog out. A Nashville dispatch, of Tuesday, says that the friends of Governor Johnson confidently expect his nomination by the Republican Convention as Vice President on the ticket with President Lincoln. Incendiaries thrive in Vicksburg. There have been many fires recently; several Government stores have been burned, and the railroad depot and adjoining buildings set on fire. Cents hereafter coined will be composed of ninety-five per centum of copper and five per centum of tin or zinc. Elisha R. Potter is the nominee of the Democratic State Convention for Governor of Connecticut at the coming election. Major General Lew Wallace, of Indiana, has entered upon duty a
orrest and his everlasting marauders might now be caught before they got back to Mississippi. The Florida's escape — official report of Com'r Preble. The following is the report in full made by Commander Preble to the U. S. Navy Department relative to the escape of the Florida: U. S. Sloop-of-War St. Louis,Funchal Roads, Madeira,March 1, 1864--1½ A. M. Sir: The Florida has succeeded in getting to sea. I shall follow at once, though hopeless of catching her out of port. Nelson said the want of frigates in his squadron would be found impressed on his heart. I am sure the want of steam will be found engraven on mine. Had the St. Louis been a steamer, I would have anchored alongside of her, and, unrestricted by the twenty-four-hour rule, my old foe could not have escaped me. The Governor, true to his declared intention, would only allow her to take on board twenty tons of coal — sufficient to take her to the nearest port. Her commander plead for sixty tons, next f
ded. Two rebels were killed and several wounded. Forrest's raid — his capture of prisoners at Union city — his reported repulse at Paducah. The accounts of Gen. Forrest's progress in his raid are contradictory. He captured Union City,f what they claim to be his repulse at that place: Gen. Forrest had about 7,000 men in the attack on Paducah. His lineight. Forty convalescents in the hospital were captured. Forrest sent in a flag of truce to exchange prisoners, but Col. Hi After being once repulsed in the attack on the fort, Forrest sent a communication to Col. Hicks, demanding the surrende— name not yet known. The New York Tribunes, noticing Forrest's raid, says: There is something wrong — very far wr thousand cavalry, if he be not there yet. We should think Forrest and his everlasting marauders might now be caught before tuckner or Presion, or both, strengthened by John Morgan's, Forrest's, and Champ Ferguson's cavalry, will co-operate with him
a fort, which is quite a high sounding announcement in war, does not appear to have amounted to much in the capture of Fort De Russey, in Louisiana. It was garrisoned by only two or three companies of Confederates. The official report of Rear Admiral Porter to the U. S. Navy Department says: The gunboats arrived at Simmesport at noon, and found the enemy posted in force about three miles back. The Benton landed her crew and drove in the pickets. The army came along in about half an hour more and landed next morning, taking possession of the enemy's camping ground. That night Gen. Smith concluded to follow them by land while Admiral Porter proceeded up Red river with all the gunboats and transports. In the meantime the Eastport had reached the obstructions, and with the vessels that kept pace with her commenced the work of demolition on the formidable barricade on which the rebels had been employed five months. They supposed it impossible, but our energetic sailors, with
March 30th (search for this): article 1
men, ceased firing, when our troops proceeded to the assault and carried the place. In a few minutes, and with small loss, 250 prisoners, eight heavy guns, and two field pieces, fell into our hands, and all the munitions of war. The main body of the enemy, 5,000 strong under the rebel General Walker, made their escape. Highly important from Grant's Army. That very soft people, the Yankees, are reading news dispatches such as this we find in the New York Herald, dated Washington, March 30th. The effort seems to be to "push up the man on horseback" into the niche of a hero before they know whether he will fit or not: Accounts from the field represent the greatest enthusiasm prevailing in the Army of the Potomac in favor of Gen. Grant. His quiet, unassuming, and unpretentious style pleases all. He refuses special trains and cars for his exclusive use, and says he requires but one seat. His notions of economy in transportation preclude the occupation of a whole car for o
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