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Constable (search for this): article 1
ed severely. The 54th regiment arrived in the afternoon, and formed on the square. Nelson Welts, the man who fired the first shot, was instantly killed. John Cooper, a prisoner, was shot while trying to escape. Col. Brooks, with a squad of men, went in pursuit of the gang of Copperheads about seven miles. Capt. Williams has some twenty prominent secesh implicated in the affair under guard at the Court House Col. Mitchell had a conference with the Hon. O. B. Franklin and Judge Constable, who seemed very anxious that steps should be taken to prevent a further outbreak. Chicago, March 30, 1864.--A dispatch dated Mattoon, Ill., last night, says: Four hundred men of the 54th Illinois regiment leave Charleston to night to attack the rebels, who are said to be three hundred strong, under the command of Sheriff John S. O' Hair, entrenched at Gillady's Mills, ten miles northeast of Charleston. A portion of the 54th Illinois is at Mattoon, that place also bein
will be found engraven on mine. Had the St. Louis been a steamer, I would have anchored alongside of her, and, unrestricted by the twenty-four-hour rule, my old foe could not have escaped me. The Governor, true to his declared intention, would only allow her to take on board twenty tons of coal — sufficient to take her to the nearest port. Her commander plead for sixty tons, next forty, asserting that he needed that much to ballast his vessel. The Governor told him, at the suggestion of Mr. Bayman, that he came in without it, and he thought he could go without it; but if ballast was needed, there was plenty of stone on the beach that he might take. As it was supposed that she would go to sea during the night, and certainly in the morning, and I had an intimation that, in passing us, she might pour in a broadside, I shotted and cast loose my guns, and had men to man them; got a slip rope on the chain, and stationed lookouts all over the ship and in the tops; cautioned the office
he fight lasted all the afternoon. Four assaults were made on the fourteen masse, each of which was repulsed with great slaughter to the enemy. The gunboats fired 600 rounds. A large portion of the town is in ruins. The rebels plundered the stores and carried off horses during the fight. Forty convalescents in the hospital were captured. Forrest sent in a flag of truce to exchange prisoners, but Col. Hicks declined. Three hundred rebel dead lie in front of our fort. Gens. Harris and Burbage were with the rebels. Boats from Paducah at noon yesterday report all quiet. The citizens are rebuilding the town. Several women were killed during the fight. Our less was 14 killed and 45 wounded. The Peosta and Pawpaw, tin-clads, were the gunboats which participated in the late battle at Paducah, opening fire simultaneously with the fort on the enemy's advance into the city, and rendering invaluable service throughout the engagement. After being once repulsed in the atta
G. W. Ewing (search for this): article 1
advance being circulated among the inhabitants. A gentleman living in Monticello assures us that most of the Kentucky delegation representing the State in the rebel Congress at Richmond have returned and are inciting the people to revolt. He said that before he left Monticello he was told by a secessionist that if he would come to a certain place which he pointed out to him, he would there see G. W. Triplet, of Louisville, who had just come from Richmond, in company of E. M. Bruce, G. W. Ewing, T. L. Burnett, and other rebel Kentuckian. He was also told that these gentlemen had come for the purpose of preparing the people for the approaching arrival of Breckinridge and Buckner. The Louisville Journal of the 18th, in speaking of the expected rebel raid into Kentucky, says that not a few Kentucky rebels in the South have written within a short time to their rebel relations, friends, and sympathizers at home, to sell or in some way make secure their horses, mules, cattle, sh
Richard M. Smith (search for this): article 1
from thence across Tennessee and Kentucky and attack our posts on the Ohio river. We have a great force of cavalry and mounted infantry in that section. Indeed, Smith, who failed so badly in Mississippi, was there the other day with his ten thousand cavalry, if he be not there yet. We should think Forrest and his everlasting mar drove in the pickets. The army came along in about half an hour more and landed next morning, taking possession of the enemy's camping ground. That night Gen. Smith concluded to follow them by land while Admiral Porter proceeded up Red river with all the gunboats and transports. In the meantime the Eastport had reached the, with hard work opened a passage in a few hours. The Eastport and Neosho proceeded to the fort, which at that moment was being surrounded by the troops under General Smith, who had marched from Semmesport. A brisk musketry fire was going on between the rebels and our own troops, and they were so close together it was difficult t
New York Wednesday (search for this): article 1
east to ransack her throughout her whole extent, sweeping away everything of value and leaving her stripped and desolate. The Journal considers that the main purpose of Breckinridge's movement into Western Virginia is an evasion of Kentucky, and that there is no doubt that a powerful force under Buckner or Presion, or both, strengthened by John Morgan's, Forrest's, and Champ Ferguson's cavalry, will co-operate with him in the invasion. Commercial and Financial. Gold opened in New York Wednesday with some degree of activity at 165; but when it was announced that Mr. Cisco had set the price of the gold certificates at 164 it became heavy, and dropped down to 163½. The Herald's commercial report says: By the Champion, from Aspinwall, we learn the arrival at Panama of two millions and a half of gold, which the Golden City brought from California. Only two hundred and seventy thousand dollars of the treasure come to this city — the rest going to England as a measure of sec
Goodrich William Hart (search for this): article 1
he Court-House yard were drawn into an affray, and a general fight occurred. The County Sheriff sprang from the Judge's stand and commenced firing a pistol at Union men Major York, surgeon of the 54th, was one of the first victims. The Union men, being outnumbered at the Court House, ran to the houses and stores for arms. They were fired upon from the windows. Ten or twelve were wounded. Col. Mitchell, of the 54th regiment, was badly wounded; Oliver Sales was killed; James Goodrich Wm. Hart, T. C. Jeffreys, and several soldiers belonging to the 54th, were wounded severely. The 54th regiment arrived in the afternoon, and formed on the square. Nelson Welts, the man who fired the first shot, was instantly killed. John Cooper, a prisoner, was shot while trying to escape. Col. Brooks, with a squad of men, went in pursuit of the gang of Copperheads about seven miles. Capt. Williams has some twenty prominent secesh implicated in the affair under guard at the Cou
T. C. Jeffreys (search for this): article 1
rd were drawn into an affray, and a general fight occurred. The County Sheriff sprang from the Judge's stand and commenced firing a pistol at Union men Major York, surgeon of the 54th, was one of the first victims. The Union men, being outnumbered at the Court House, ran to the houses and stores for arms. They were fired upon from the windows. Ten or twelve were wounded. Col. Mitchell, of the 54th regiment, was badly wounded; Oliver Sales was killed; James Goodrich Wm. Hart, T. C. Jeffreys, and several soldiers belonging to the 54th, were wounded severely. The 54th regiment arrived in the afternoon, and formed on the square. Nelson Welts, the man who fired the first shot, was instantly killed. John Cooper, a prisoner, was shot while trying to escape. Col. Brooks, with a squad of men, went in pursuit of the gang of Copperheads about seven miles. Capt. Williams has some twenty prominent secesh implicated in the affair under guard at the Court House Col. Mitc
Nelson Welts (search for this): article 1
ajor York, surgeon of the 54th, was one of the first victims. The Union men, being outnumbered at the Court House, ran to the houses and stores for arms. They were fired upon from the windows. Ten or twelve were wounded. Col. Mitchell, of the 54th regiment, was badly wounded; Oliver Sales was killed; James Goodrich Wm. Hart, T. C. Jeffreys, and several soldiers belonging to the 54th, were wounded severely. The 54th regiment arrived in the afternoon, and formed on the square. Nelson Welts, the man who fired the first shot, was instantly killed. John Cooper, a prisoner, was shot while trying to escape. Col. Brooks, with a squad of men, went in pursuit of the gang of Copperheads about seven miles. Capt. Williams has some twenty prominent secesh implicated in the affair under guard at the Court House Col. Mitchell had a conference with the Hon. O. B. Franklin and Judge Constable, who seemed very anxious that steps should be taken to prevent a further outbreak.
O. B. Franklin (search for this): article 1
to the 54th, were wounded severely. The 54th regiment arrived in the afternoon, and formed on the square. Nelson Welts, the man who fired the first shot, was instantly killed. John Cooper, a prisoner, was shot while trying to escape. Col. Brooks, with a squad of men, went in pursuit of the gang of Copperheads about seven miles. Capt. Williams has some twenty prominent secesh implicated in the affair under guard at the Court House Col. Mitchell had a conference with the Hon. O. B. Franklin and Judge Constable, who seemed very anxious that steps should be taken to prevent a further outbreak. Chicago, March 30, 1864.--A dispatch dated Mattoon, Ill., last night, says: Four hundred men of the 54th Illinois regiment leave Charleston to night to attack the rebels, who are said to be three hundred strong, under the command of Sheriff John S. O' Hair, entrenched at Gillady's Mills, ten miles northeast of Charleston. A portion of the 54th Illinois is at Matto
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