hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Grant 23 1 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 18 0 Browse Search
G. P. Copeland 17 1 Browse Search
Herschel V. Johnson 16 0 Browse Search
Ewell 15 1 Browse Search
Jones 14 0 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Butler 10 2 Browse Search
Pegram 10 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 25, 1864., [Electronic resource].

Found 478 total hits in 238 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
Chester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
tt, (of Petersburg,) 5th Virginia cavalry, was captured some days since at the house of a relative in Chesterfield. He was on furlough at the time having been wounded some time ago in a cavalry fight near Brandy Station. We continue to receive accounts of the depredations of the enemy in his recent advance through Chesterfield county. Among the sufferers is Mr. G. P. Copeland, a portrait painter of merit, who resides to the left of the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad, two miles from Chester. Butler visited the house, accompanied by a body guard of eight hundred negro cavalry, and spent nearly the shole of one day on the premises. He informed Mr. and Mrs. Copeland that a battle was almost inevitable in that particular locality and that if they remained their lives would be in great peril. They were also assured that their property should be protected. The Beast had the duplicity to add to Mrs. Copeland, "General Butler, Madam, is a mate of his word — his pledge is his bond,
Chesterfield (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
face of a terrific fire, charged the formidable fortifications of the enemy, and carried them at the point of the bayonet. It was in this charge that General Walker, riding by mistake into the enemy's lines, was captured after his horse was shot, and himself wounded in the foot. Walker's brigade is the same formerly commanded by General Evans, of Leesburg fame. Lieut. Henry C. Howlett, (of Petersburg,) 5th Virginia cavalry, was captured some days since at the house of a relative in Chesterfield. He was on furlough at the time having been wounded some time ago in a cavalry fight near Brandy Station. We continue to receive accounts of the depredations of the enemy in his recent advance through Chesterfield county. Among the sufferers is Mr. G. P. Copeland, a portrait painter of merit, who resides to the left of the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad, two miles from Chester. Butler visited the house, accompanied by a body guard of eight hundred negro cavalry, and spent nearly
Herschel V. Johnson (search for this): article 1
tions of the command behaved equally well, but Jones's brigade, of Johnson's division, which did not stand firmly at the Wilderness, and was go on or return. Since different accounts of the attack upon Johnson's division, of Ewell's corps, on the morning of the 12th have beenfficer to whom I made application: On the morning of the 12th Johnson's division occupied the right of Ewell's corps. Haves's brigade btended to cover this gap. At 3 o'clock on the morning of the 12th, Johnson asked for artillery, saying the enemy was massing heavily in his f the men from unlimbering their guns, and capturing the guns and Gen. Johnson, who was endeavoring to rally his command. As the enemy rushed gade, and succeeded in checking the enemy for a time. The loss of Johnson's division was about 2,000 prisoners and eighteen pieces of artill and put in on the right of Harris, and still later the remnant of Johnson's division moved up to close the gap between Pegram's left and the
ksburg Railroad. Gen. Lee, nor to allow his adversary to proceed alone, ordered Ewell to advance and strike him in the flank and rear, and thus compel him to return to his former position — Ewell marched cut of the trenches late in the afternoon, and encountered the enemy a little before sunset. A sharp, brief combat ensued, th In consequence of the unsteadiness of a portion of the corps here alluded to Ewell did not press his advantages, nor bring off some forty five wagons which he capreturn. Since different accounts of the attack upon Johnson's division, of Ewell's corps, on the morning of the 12th have been given to the public, and since albattle, and who was in a position to understand what was going on as fully as Gen. Ewell himself, for the facts so far as they fell under his own eye. The following iation: On the morning of the 12th Johnson's division occupied the right of Ewell's corps. Haves's brigade being on his left; then J. M. Walkers, (Stonewall,) n
troops from the Valley of the Shenandoah and the former from counties in Southwestern Virginia. Pegram's brigade, of the same division, on the contrary, displayed much gallantry. In consequence them. The Federals being thus checked, he formed the other three regiments of his brigade, and Pegram's Virginia brigade, and put them in on the right of the other three regiments, and pushed back te troops were doing splendidly, there was still a gap of some length between Ramseur's right and Pegram's left, where the enemy held our works, and through this they continued to press. To close thisof the Stonewall brigade, and there broke off towards the right through the woods, and nearly to Pegram's left — Again and again the enemy made desperate efforts to drive out the Confederates and prest of Harris, and still later the remnant of Johnson's division moved up to close the gap between Pegram's left and the right of the other troops to about one hundred yards in the angle of the works wh
R. E. Lee (search for this): article 1
quiet as a summer morning. It was ascertained yesterday that the enemy was again referring from our left front, where he had been so handsomely repulsed the day before by Gordon, and was moving towards the Richmond and Fredericksburg Railroad. Gen. Lee, nor to allow his adversary to proceed alone, ordered Ewell to advance and strike him in the flank and rear, and thus compel him to return to his former position — Ewell marched cut of the trenches late in the afternoon, and encountered the enemin the whole of our lines, we should probably not have lost any part of them if the artillery had been in position when the assault was made. No one has been appointed to succeed Gen. Stuart, the cavalry for the present, under an order from Gen. Lee, reporting to him by divisions.--Hampton is the ranking officer of that arm of the service in Virginia. I fear my letters have reached you irregularly, owing to the recent interruption of our communications. I have written promptly, howeve
s of Jones's line and the artillery.--This position they continued to hold during the day against repeated assaults, although their left was never supported by other troops. A little after Gordon had gone in, Ramseur's North Carolina brigade, of Rodes's division, made a magnificent charge upon the enemy's right as they poured through the works, driving them out with slaughter and retaking the line of the Louisiana and part of the Stonewall brigade, and here they stood all day. Although thength between Ramseur's right and Pegram's left, where the enemy held our works, and through this they continued to press. To close this gap and regain our whole line and the artillery, there was desperate fighting. Battle's Alabama brigade, of Rodes's division, was thrown in on Ramseur's right his centre passing the McCoul house, and drove the enemy back some distance into the wood, gaining a foot hold in the wood which they resolutely held. The enemy now occupied the outside of our wor
Stonewall (search for this): article 1
ave more or less of error in them. I have applied to an intelligent officer who was present throughout the battle, and who was in a position to understand what was going on as fully as Gen. Ewell himself, for the facts so far as they fell under his own eye. The following is the substance of the statement of the officer to whom I made application: On the morning of the 12th Johnson's division occupied the right of Ewell's corps. Haves's brigade being on his left; then J. M. Walkers, (Stonewall,) next Jones's. And then Stewart's. At the junction of Jones's and Stewart's brigades, the line of works made a bend at nearly a right angle, in which a battalion of artillery had been posted.--The artillery had been withdrawn the proceeding evening, and the line of Jones's brigade was extended to cover this gap. At 3 o'clock on the morning of the 12th, Johnson asked for artillery, saying the enemy was massing heavily in his front, and Page's battalion was started to him. Jones's brigade o
May 2nd, 1864 AD (search for this): article 1
Army of Northern Virginia,Spotsylvania C. H., May 2nd, 1864. We had a little excitement last evening, but today all is quiet as a summer morning. It was ascertained yesterday that the enemy was again referring from our left front, where he had been so handsomely repulsed the day before by Gordon, and was moving towards the Richmond and Fredericksburg Railroad. Gen. Lee, nor to allow his adversary to proceed alone, ordered Ewell to advance and strike him in the flank and rear, and thus compel him to return to his former position — Ewell marched cut of the trenches late in the afternoon, and encountered the enemy a little before sunset. A sharp, brief combat ensued, the enemy being thrown into considerable confusion and referring before our troops. It is believed that the attack would have resulted in important captures had all portions of the command behaved equally well, but Jones's brigade, of Johnson's division, which did not stand firmly at the Wilderness, and was the firs
ad been posted.--The artillery had been withdrawn the proceeding evening, and the line of Jones's brigade was extended to cover this gap. At 3 o'clock on the morning of the 12th, Johnson asked for artillery, saying the enemy was massing heavily in his front, and Page's battalion was started to him. Jones's brigade of six regiments had but three in line when the assault was made at 4 o'clock; one had been detached to cover the gap of half a mile between Stewart's brigade and Lane's brigade of Wilcox's division in the right, one had been deployed as skirmishers, another had just been sent out to relieve the latter. The enemy made their attack in mess with a rush upon the point where the artillery had been, and the three regiments of Jones's brigade gave way almost without firing a shot. The artillery which had been sent was just driving up to the works at a gallop as the enemy poured over, killing the horses and preventing the men from unlimbering their guns, and capturing the guns and
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...