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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1864., [Electronic resource].

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August 29th, 1864 AD (search for this): article 1
rsonville. Petersburg. The only thing of interest in Petersburg yesterday was the artillery firing mentioned in the telegram to be found in another column. Grant is supposed to be awaiting reinforcements, to be sent him when they shall have been drafted. A letter from General Lee. The following is an extract from a letter from General Lee, complimenting the North Carolina troops for their late achievement at Reams's station: "Headquarters Army Northern Virginia, August 29, 1864. "His Excellency, Z. B. Vance, "Governor of North Carolina, Raleigh: "I have been frequently called upon to mention the services of North Carolina soldiers in this army; but their gallantry and conduct were never more deserving of admiration than in the engagement at Reams's station on the 25th instant. "The brigades of Generals Cook, McRae and Lane, the last under the temporary command of General Conner, advanced through a thick abattis of felled trees under a heavy fire of
Barringer (search for this): article 1
rth Carolina soldiers in this army; but their gallantry and conduct were never more deserving of admiration than in the engagement at Reams's station on the 25th instant. "The brigades of Generals Cook, McRae and Lane, the last under the temporary command of General Conner, advanced through a thick abattis of felled trees under a heavy fire of musketry and artillery and carried the enemy's works with a steady courage that elicited the warm commendation of their corps and division commander and the admiration of the army. "On the same occasion, the brigade of General Barringer bore a conspicuous part in the operations of the cavalry, which were no less distinguished for boldness and efficiency than those of the infantry. "If the men who remain in North Carolina share the spirit of those they have sent to the field, as I doubt not they do, her defence may be securely entrusted to their hands. "I am, with great respect, "Your obedient servant, "R. E. Lee, General."
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
ed. A letter from General Lee. The following is an extract from a letter from General Lee, complimenting the North Carolina troops for their late achievement at Reams's station: "Headquarters Army Northern Virginia, August 29, 1864. "His Excellency, Z. B. Vance, "Governor of North Carolina, Raleigh: "I have been frequently called upon to mention the services of North Carolina soldiers in this army; but their gallantry and conduct were never more deserving of admiration thanNorth Carolina soldiers in this army; but their gallantry and conduct were never more deserving of admiration than in the engagement at Reams's station on the 25th instant. "The brigades of Generals Cook, McRae and Lane, the last under the temporary command of General Conner, advanced through a thick abattis of felled trees under a heavy fire of musketry anich were no less distinguished for boldness and efficiency than those of the infantry. "If the men who remain in North Carolina share the spirit of those they have sent to the field, as I doubt not they do, her defence may be securely entrusted
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
directly upon Andersonville. Petersburg. The only thing of interest in Petersburg yesterday was the artillery firing mentioned in the telegram to be found in another column. Grant is supposed to be awaiting reinforcements, to be sent him when they shall have been drafted. A letter from General Lee. The following is an extract from a letter from General Lee, complimenting the North Carolina troops for their late achievement at Reams's station: "Headquarters Army Northern Virginia, August 29, 1864. "His Excellency, Z. B. Vance, "Governor of North Carolina, Raleigh: "I have been frequently called upon to mention the services of North Carolina soldiers in this army; but their gallantry and conduct were never more deserving of admiration than in the engagement at Reams's station on the 25th instant. "The brigades of Generals Cook, McRae and Lane, the last under the temporary command of General Conner, advanced through a thick abattis of felled trees unde
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
The war News. General Hood, in an official dispatch on the 7th, states that the enemy still hold their works, one mile and a half beyond Jonesboro'. Sherman left in Jonesboro' such of our wounded as fell into his hands when Hardee withdrew on the night of the 1st. Our wounded report, and General Hood mentions it in his dispatch, that while in Jonesboro', Sherman declared that he proposed resting his army a few days in Atlanta and then marching directly upon Andersonville. Petersburg. The only thing of interest in Petersburg yesterday was the artillery firing mentioned in the telegram to be found in another column. Grant is supposed to be awaiting reinforcements, to be sent him when they shall have been drafted. A letter from General Lee. The following is an extract from a letter from General Lee, complimenting the North Carolina troops for their late achievement at Reams's station: "Headquarters Army Northern Virginia, August 29, 1864. "His Excell
Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
The war News. General Hood, in an official dispatch on the 7th, states that the enemy still hold their works, one mile and a half beyond Jonesboro'. Sherman left in Jonesboro' such of our wounded as fell into his hands when Hardee withdrew on the night of the 1st. Our wounded report, and General Hood mentions it in his Jonesboro' such of our wounded as fell into his hands when Hardee withdrew on the night of the 1st. Our wounded report, and General Hood mentions it in his dispatch, that while in Jonesboro', Sherman declared that he proposed resting his army a few days in Atlanta and then marching directly upon Andersonville. Petersburg. The only thing of interest in Petersburg yesterday was the artillery firing mentioned in the telegram to be found in another column. Grant is supposed to beJonesboro', Sherman declared that he proposed resting his army a few days in Atlanta and then marching directly upon Andersonville. Petersburg. The only thing of interest in Petersburg yesterday was the artillery firing mentioned in the telegram to be found in another column. Grant is supposed to be awaiting reinforcements, to be sent him when they shall have been drafted. A letter from General Lee. The following is an extract from a letter from General Lee, complimenting the North Carolina troops for their late achievement at Reams's station: "Headquarters Army Northern Virginia, August 29, 1864. "His Excell
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 2
The Northern News. The Northern news sent us by our energetic telegraph agent at Petersburg will be found interesting. It seems that not even the fall of Atlanta and all the successes at Mobile have been able to drag gold down ten cents in New York. The Herald tries to explain this in every way but the right. Every Yankee success which, by cheering the Yankees, would seem to lead to a prolongation of the war, sends gold up. Only when there is a prospect of peace will gold decline.
September (search for this): article 3
life in the field, he resigned the office of provost-marshal and accepted the colonelcy of a North Carolina regiment, organized from citizens in the neighborhood of Salisbury, the scene of his first experience in the Confederate service. At the head of this regiment, Colonel Godwin fought gallantly through the battles of 1863 around Fredericksburg, including Chancellorsville, Marye's Heights, &c., and subsequently commanded Hay's Louisiana brigade at the battle of Rappahannock bridge, in September of last year, where he was captured after twice having his horses shot from under him.--About two months since he was released from a Yankee prison on account of the shattered condition of his health, superinduced by close confinement as a prisoner; but soon after returning home he regained his health, was declared exchanged, and immediately assumed command of his regiment in General Lee's army, where he has ever since been constantly engaged in resisting the assaults of the enemy around P
ement, but was afterwards made provost-marshal of Richmond, which position he filled with zeal and efficiency for upwards of twelve months. Feeling anxious for a more active life in the field, he resigned the office of provost-marshal and accepted the colonelcy of a North Carolina regiment, organized from citizens in the neighborhood of Salisbury, the scene of his first experience in the Confederate service. At the head of this regiment, Colonel Godwin fought gallantly through the battles of 1863 around Fredericksburg, including Chancellorsville, Marye's Heights, &c., and subsequently commanded Hay's Louisiana brigade at the battle of Rappahannock bridge, in September of last year, where he was captured after twice having his horses shot from under him.--About two months since he was released from a Yankee prison on account of the shattered condition of his health, superinduced by close confinement as a prisoner; but soon after returning home he regained his health, was declared excha
R. E. Lee (search for this): article 3
field, he resigned the office of provost-marshal and accepted the colonelcy of a North Carolina regiment, organized from citizens in the neighborhood of Salisbury, the scene of his first experience in the Confederate service. At the head of this regiment, Colonel Godwin fought gallantly through the battles of 1863 around Fredericksburg, including Chancellorsville, Marye's Heights, &c., and subsequently commanded Hay's Louisiana brigade at the battle of Rappahannock bridge, in September of last year, where he was captured after twice having his horses shot from under him.--About two months since he was released from a Yankee prison on account of the shattered condition of his health, superinduced by close confinement as a prisoner; but soon after returning home he regained his health, was declared exchanged, and immediately assumed command of his regiment in General Lee's army, where he has ever since been constantly engaged in resisting the assaults of the enemy around Petersburg.
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