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ency for upwards of twelve months. Feeling anxious for a more active life in the field, he resigned the office of provost-marshal and accepted the colonelcy of a North Carolina regiment, organized from citizens in the neighborhood of Salisbury, the scene of his first experience in the Confederate service. At the head of this regiment, Colonel Godwin fought gallantly through the battles of 1863 around Fredericksburg, including Chancellorsville, Marye's Heights, &c., and subsequently commanded Hay's Louisiana brigade at the battle of Rappahannock bridge, in September of last year, where he was captured after twice having his horses shot from under him.--About two months since he was released from a Yankee prison on account of the shattered condition of his health, superinduced by close confinement as a prisoner; but soon after returning home he regained his health, was declared exchanged, and immediately assumed command of his regiment in General Lee's army, where he has ever since bee
August 9th, 1864 AD (search for this): article 3
Promotion. Colonel Archibald C. Godwin, a native of Nansemond county, Virginia, has been promoted to the rank of brigadier-general in the Confederate service, his commission to date from the 9th of August, 1864. General Godwin was a resident of California at the breaking out of the war, where, although a very young man, he occupied a high position as a practicing lawyer. Upon the passage of the Ordinance of Secession by his native State, he came hither, and was assigned by the Confederate Government to the command of the military prison at Salisbury, North Carolina. Subsequently, upon the establishment of a prison here for captured Yankees, he was transferred to its management, but was afterwards made provost-marshal of Richmond, which position he filled with zeal and efficiency for upwards of twelve months. Feeling anxious for a more active life in the field, he resigned the office of provost-marshal and accepted the colonelcy of a North Carolina regiment, organized from citi
Archibald C. Godwin (search for this): article 3
Promotion. Colonel Archibald C. Godwin, a native of Nansemond county, Virginia, has been promoted to the rank of brigadier-general in the Confederate service, his commission to date from the 9th of August, 1864. General Godwin was a resident of California at the breaking out of the war, where, although a very young man, he ocGeneral Godwin was a resident of California at the breaking out of the war, where, although a very young man, he occupied a high position as a practicing lawyer. Upon the passage of the Ordinance of Secession by his native State, he came hither, and was assigned by the Confederate Government to the command of the military prison at Salisbury, North Carolina. Subsequently, upon the establishment of a prison here for captured Yankees, he was tgiment, organized from citizens in the neighborhood of Salisbury, the scene of his first experience in the Confederate service. At the head of this regiment, Colonel Godwin fought gallantly through the battles of 1863 around Fredericksburg, including Chancellorsville, Marye's Heights, &c., and subsequently commanded Hay's Louisia
California (California, United States) (search for this): article 3
Promotion. Colonel Archibald C. Godwin, a native of Nansemond county, Virginia, has been promoted to the rank of brigadier-general in the Confederate service, his commission to date from the 9th of August, 1864. General Godwin was a resident of California at the breaking out of the war, where, although a very young man, he occupied a high position as a practicing lawyer. Upon the passage of the Ordinance of Secession by his native State, he came hither, and was assigned by the Confederate Government to the command of the military prison at Salisbury, North Carolina. Subsequently, upon the establishment of a prison here for captured Yankees, he was transferred to its management, but was afterwards made provost-marshal of Richmond, which position he filled with zeal and efficiency for upwards of twelve months. Feeling anxious for a more active life in the field, he resigned the office of provost-marshal and accepted the colonelcy of a North Carolina regiment, organized from citiz
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
al of Richmond, which position he filled with zeal and efficiency for upwards of twelve months. Feeling anxious for a more active life in the field, he resigned the office of provost-marshal and accepted the colonelcy of a North Carolina regiment, organized from citizens in the neighborhood of Salisbury, the scene of his first experience in the Confederate service. At the head of this regiment, Colonel Godwin fought gallantly through the battles of 1863 around Fredericksburg, including Chancellorsville, Marye's Heights, &c., and subsequently commanded Hay's Louisiana brigade at the battle of Rappahannock bridge, in September of last year, where he was captured after twice having his horses shot from under him.--About two months since he was released from a Yankee prison on account of the shattered condition of his health, superinduced by close confinement as a prisoner; but soon after returning home he regained his health, was declared exchanged, and immediately assumed command of his
Suffolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
Promotion. Colonel Archibald C. Godwin, a native of Nansemond county, Virginia, has been promoted to the rank of brigadier-general in the Confederate service, his commission to date from the 9th of August, 1864. General Godwin was a resident of California at the breaking out of the war, where, although a very young man, he occupied a high position as a practicing lawyer. Upon the passage of the Ordinance of Secession by his native State, he came hither, and was assigned by the Confederate Government to the command of the military prison at Salisbury, North Carolina. Subsequently, upon the establishment of a prison here for captured Yankees, he was transferred to its management, but was afterwards made provost-marshal of Richmond, which position he filled with zeal and efficiency for upwards of twelve months. Feeling anxious for a more active life in the field, he resigned the office of provost-marshal and accepted the colonelcy of a North Carolina regiment, organized from citiz
Salisbury, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
d county, Virginia, has been promoted to the rank of brigadier-general in the Confederate service, his commission to date from the 9th of August, 1864. General Godwin was a resident of California at the breaking out of the war, where, although a very young man, he occupied a high position as a practicing lawyer. Upon the passage of the Ordinance of Secession by his native State, he came hither, and was assigned by the Confederate Government to the command of the military prison at Salisbury, North Carolina. Subsequently, upon the establishment of a prison here for captured Yankees, he was transferred to its management, but was afterwards made provost-marshal of Richmond, which position he filled with zeal and efficiency for upwards of twelve months. Feeling anxious for a more active life in the field, he resigned the office of provost-marshal and accepted the colonelcy of a North Carolina regiment, organized from citizens in the neighborhood of Salisbury, the scene of his first expe
Marye's Heights (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
ich position he filled with zeal and efficiency for upwards of twelve months. Feeling anxious for a more active life in the field, he resigned the office of provost-marshal and accepted the colonelcy of a North Carolina regiment, organized from citizens in the neighborhood of Salisbury, the scene of his first experience in the Confederate service. At the head of this regiment, Colonel Godwin fought gallantly through the battles of 1863 around Fredericksburg, including Chancellorsville, Marye's Heights, &c., and subsequently commanded Hay's Louisiana brigade at the battle of Rappahannock bridge, in September of last year, where he was captured after twice having his horses shot from under him.--About two months since he was released from a Yankee prison on account of the shattered condition of his health, superinduced by close confinement as a prisoner; but soon after returning home he regained his health, was declared exchanged, and immediately assumed command of his regiment in Gene
McClellan (search for this): article 4
acy is, that it is composed of two violently, antagonistic sections; the one clamorous for war, and the other clamorous for peace; and, between the two, poor General McClellan is suffering sadly. Thus, the war men hate Pendleton, who runs as the peace candidate for Vice-President; and the peace men hate McClellan, because he is thMcClellan, because he is the war candidate for President. Result: indifference everywhere, discontent everywhere, apathy everywhere. The same paper has the following: It is one of the novel features of the present political campaign that the party whose candidate runs upon a purely military record depends chiefly for its success upon the defeat orous warfare which the Daily News anathematizes with such peaceful ferocity of spirit. What is more strange, neither party claims to have changed his opinions — McClellan the hero of the war which Pendleton denounces as murderous. How the Chicago members Talked. The correspondent of the Cincinnati Gazette, in journeying to
apital in the fourth year of the war were paraded, and Grant's flanking operations were laughed at, and the ability of Jeff Davis was exultantly eulogized. Mr. Chase and the Presidency. Some of Mr. Chase's friends lately addressed him a letter of inquiry as to his views on the political situation, but more particularly toMr. Chase's friends lately addressed him a letter of inquiry as to his views on the political situation, but more particularly to ascertain whether he was opposed to Mr. Lincoln's re-election. In his reply, Mr. Chase says: I do not see any reason for believing that the great cause to which we are all bound can be promoted any better, or as well, by withdrawing support from the nomination made at Baltimore; and no cause of dissatisfaction, however stroMr. Chase says: I do not see any reason for believing that the great cause to which we are all bound can be promoted any better, or as well, by withdrawing support from the nomination made at Baltimore; and no cause of dissatisfaction, however strong, will warrant any sacrifice of that cause. What future circumstances may require or warrant cannot now be forescen, and need not now be considered. I particularly desire my friends to do nothing or say nothing that can create the impression that there is any personal difference between Mr. Lincoln and myself, for there is none
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