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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1864., [Electronic resource].

Found 357 total hits in 174 results.

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September 4th (search for this): article 4
The Presidential campaign in the North. To show the spirit in which the Presidential campaign is conducted, we make some extracts from late Northern papers. The Washington Chronicle (Lincoln's organ) of September 4th says: The trouble in the ranks of the Vallandigham Democracy is, that it is composed of two violently, antagonistic sections; the one clamorous for war, and the other clamorous for peace; and, between the two, poor General McClellan is suffering sadly. Thus, the war men hate Pendleton, who runs as the peace candidate for Vice-President; and the peace men hate McClellan, because he is the war candidate for President. Result: indifference everywhere, discontent everywhere, apathy everywhere. The same paper has the following: It is one of the novel features of the present political campaign that the party whose candidate runs upon a purely military record depends chiefly for its success upon the defeat of our armies in the field.--Prevaricate or deny
alk was the evident delight at our military failures. I do not write the words willingly; for, realizing profoundly that this rebellion can be put down by no party and by no effort that stops short of embracing the people of the North, I know how fully it is admitting that the end of these troublous times is not yet in sight. But there could be no mistaking the tone of exultation in which the invasion of the North and the siege of the capital in the fourth year of the war were paraded, and Grant's flanking operations were laughed at, and the ability of Jeff Davis was exultantly eulogized. Mr. Chase and the Presidency. Some of Mr. Chase's friends lately addressed him a letter of inquiry as to his views on the political situation, but more particularly to ascertain whether he was opposed to Mr. Lincoln's re-election. In his reply, Mr. Chase says: I do not see any reason for believing that the great cause to which we are all bound can be promoted any better, or as well
hich the Presidential campaign is conducted, we make some extracts from late Northern papers. The Washington Chronicle (Lincoln's organ) of September 4th says: The trouble in the ranks of the Vallandigham Democracy is, that it is composed of ton of the slaveholders' rebellion. He even now wears the stars upon his shoulders which were conferred upon him by President Lincoln for his services in leading our armies while they carried on that murderous warfare which the Daily News anathematier of inquiry as to his views on the political situation, but more particularly to ascertain whether he was opposed to Mr. Lincoln's re-election. In his reply, Mr. Chase says: I do not see any reason for believing that the great cause to whice my friends to do nothing or say nothing that can create the impression that there is any personal difference between Mr. Lincoln and myself, for there is none. All the differences that exist are on public questions, and have no private bearing.
Vallandigham (search for this): article 4
atus of Mr. Pendleton, the Democratic candidate for the Vice-Presidency: George H. Pendleton is, in the words of the Tribune, "an anti-war Copperhead of the most intense shade; and his votes in Congress have rarely differed from those of Vallandigham and Benjamin Harris." Precisely so; and, as such, stands upon the Democratic ticket a worthy representative of that glorious phalanx which stood up in the Congress of the United States to denounce, in the face of raving madness, a war which ha-aye, murdered,--at the bidding of a fanatical Abolition, hundreds of thousands of our sons and brothers. George H. Pendleton, it is true, protested against the destructive passions of fanaticism, standing in his place in Congress beside Vallandigham and Harris. The editor of the Daily News, who looks forward with a deepening pride to the memory of so glorious a fellowship, can bear witness that that same George H. Pendleton has dared to vote with the fearless and few who did not shrink f
Andrew Jackson (search for this): article 4
ongress of the United States to denounce, in the face of raving madness, a war which has devastated the country," &c. Mr. Pendleton, therefore, has not merely opposed the manner in which the Administration has conducted the war, but the war itself; and he is now put forward by men who claim to be patriotic and loyal as a candidate for the Vice-Presidency. We need not say that no War Democrat; no patriot who is in favor of preserving the Union at all hazards; no disciple of the school of Andrew Jackson, who said that the "Union must and shall be preserved," can vote for George H. Pendleton. He will be cordially sustained by traitors of the school of the Daily News, who have constantly given aid to the rebellion, while swearing allegiance to the Constitution; but no man who is honest in professing to desire the preservation of the Union, peaceably if it may be, but forcibly if it must be, can vote for George H. Pendleton. Yet Pendleton, who utterly loathes and hates the war, sta
George H. Pendleton (search for this): article 4
is suffering sadly. Thus, the war men hate Pendleton, who runs as the peace candidate for Vice-Pr News thus defines the political status of Mr. Pendleton, the Democratic candidate for the Vice-Presidency: George H. Pendleton is, in the words of the Tribune, "an anti-war Copperhead of the ousands of our sons and brothers. George H. Pendleton, it is true, protested against the destowship, can bear witness that that same George H. Pendleton has dared to vote with the fearless andr will remark that the Daily News declares Mr. Pendleton "stands upon the Democratic ticket a worthwar which has devastated the country," &c. Mr. Pendleton, therefore, has not merely opposed the manut forcibly if it must be, can vote for George H. Pendleton. Yet Pendleton, who utterly loathPendleton, who utterly loathes and hates the war, stands on the same ticket and in the subordinate place with a man who has woninions — McClellan the hero of the war which Pendleton denounces as murderous. How the Chicago [1 more...]
Benjamin Harris (search for this): article 4
on, the Democratic candidate for the Vice-Presidency: George H. Pendleton is, in the words of the Tribune, "an anti-war Copperhead of the most intense shade; and his votes in Congress have rarely differed from those of Vallandigham and Benjamin Harris." Precisely so; and, as such, stands upon the Democratic ticket a worthy representative of that glorious phalanx which stood up in the Congress of the United States to denounce, in the face of raving madness, a war which has devastated the c,--at the bidding of a fanatical Abolition, hundreds of thousands of our sons and brothers. George H. Pendleton, it is true, protested against the destructive passions of fanaticism, standing in his place in Congress beside Vallandigham and Harris. The editor of the Daily News, who looks forward with a deepening pride to the memory of so glorious a fellowship, can bear witness that that same George H. Pendleton has dared to vote with the fearless and few who did not shrink from breasting
et dinner, and not apprehending danger, I left my revolver and bowie-knife behind. At a point half way between the wagons and the ranch, three armed Indians, mounted on fleet horses, dashed down from the bluffs at full speed into the road, and shot a man through the head and scalped him instantly. He was just a little way behind me, driving a two-horse team. I shall ever feel indebted to my legs for my life and scalp. You may believe they conveyed me with the speed of a quarter-horse to Metcalf's ranch. The ranchmen mounted their horses, pursued, and fired at, the Indians as they retreated over the bluffs. * * * "The overland road passes along the Little Blue for perhaps fifty miles, and all along that distance, at intervals, we saw men and women lying in the road and by the wayside dead, stripped, shot full of holes and scalped. The Ewbank family,--except the old lady, who was away from home,--all lie within a few yards of each other — a gray-headed man, two grown daughter
the rear to get dinner, and not apprehending danger, I left my revolver and bowie-knife behind. At a point half way between the wagons and the ranch, three armed Indians, mounted on fleet horses, dashed down from the bluffs at full speed into the road, and shot a man through the head and scalped him instantly. He was just a littloo well armed, we did not stop to bury the dead, as we saw a number of parties on the opposite side of the river, and some of our men declared that they saw fifty Indians. I looked with both my eyes, which I think, just at time, were unusually dilated, and I did not see an Indian. We traveled through there at such speed that the he house by some returning empty train of wagons. The Indians discovered him, chased him into the house, where he returned to the hole in the roof and, shot four Indians, before they made a rush upon the house and set fire to it, intending to burn the boy alive; but he shot down the back way and escaped through the brush. "At
rn the boy alive; but he shot down the back way and escaped through the brush. "At the next ranch were two men dead, shot full of arrows, and scalped. Others were killed a little way from the house; but the inhabitants were so filled with consternation that they did not venture to bring them in. Nearly all who were unharmed were fleeing to Marysville and other parts of Kansas more densely populated." The overland mail to the Pacific has been stopped by the Indian hostilities. Contractors on that route report that the road is materially injured, and that five thousand Indians are on the war path. They urge that a suitable number of the army be sent into that region, under the command of General Harney. From all accounts, the Indians on the Plains are giving the Yankees a very effective "fire in the rear," and meting out to them a taste of the outrages which they have so long practised upon defenceless people in the South. There is something like retribution in all this.
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