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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 8, 1865., [Electronic resource].

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nclusion of this prayer all rose, and the Gloria in Excelsin was sung in English to the familiar chant in G major, to which it is usually sung in our parish churches. The service concludes with another invocation, and the choir again sing the Mnohayah Lyeta, which is the signal for dismissal. Trinity Chapel was crowded, and a large number of the clergy; of the Episcopal Church were present. In the chancel were Bishop Southgate, formerly Missionary Bishop Resident at Constantinople; Rev. Dr. Dix, Rector of Trinity Parish? and Rev. Dr. Thrall, a member of the Russo-Greek Committee, appointed in the General Convention of 1862.--Outside the chancel were other clergy of Trinity Parish, and Rev. Dr. McVickar, the oldest Presbyter in the Diocese of New York. From sixty to seventy members of the orthodox communion (i. e., the Greek Church) occupied seats near the chancel, and followed the service with close attention, making the sign of the cross and inclinations of the head at th
and joy; Grief no more shall rent our breasts, Tears no more shall dew our eye. III. Heaven-directed spirits rise To the temple of the skies! Join the ranks of angels bright Near the Eternal's dazzling light. Hallelujah! Hallelujah! Hallelujah! After the previous ectene or litany, and the Cherubic hymn, is said another long ectene, and the Nicene Creed, which was sung in English, omitting the clause "and the Son," or filioque; which, by the way, was interpolated into the creed by Nicholas I, Bishop of Rome, in the ninth century, and has the sanction of no ecumenical council whatever. This point has ever since been the point of difference between the Eastern and Western churches. Immediately after the creed occur these passages: Priest--Stand we well; stand we with fear; let us attend to offer the holy Oblation in peace. Choir--The anointing of peace; the sacrifice of praise. Priest--The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ and the love of God the Father, and t
nary Bishop Resident at Constantinople; Rev. Dr. Dix, Rector of Trinity Parish? and Rev. Dr. Thrall, a member of the Russo-Greek Committee, appointed in the General Convention of 1862.--Outside the chancel were other clergy of Trinity Parish, and Rev. Dr. McVickar, the oldest Presbyter in the Diocese of New York. From sixty to seventy members of the orthodox communion (i. e., the Greek Church) occupied seats near the chancel, and followed the service with close attention, making the sign of the cross and inclinations of the head at the proper points. The choir. The choir, which sang admirably, was composed of picked singers, who volunteered their services, and were rehearsed under the direction of Rev. Freeman Young, who brought the music from Russia. It was arranged in four parts, and made available by translating the Slavonian words and sounds into English characters. The members of the choir were Messrs. Thatcher, Leggott, Rockwood, Davies, Camp, Aiken and Trost.
oir likewise kneeling. At the conclusion of this prayer all rose, and the Gloria in Excelsin was sung in English to the familiar chant in G major, to which it is usually sung in our parish churches. The service concludes with another invocation, and the choir again sing the Mnohayah Lyeta, which is the signal for dismissal. Trinity Chapel was crowded, and a large number of the clergy; of the Episcopal Church were present. In the chancel were Bishop Southgate, formerly Missionary Bishop Resident at Constantinople; Rev. Dr. Dix, Rector of Trinity Parish? and Rev. Dr. Thrall, a member of the Russo-Greek Committee, appointed in the General Convention of 1862.--Outside the chancel were other clergy of Trinity Parish, and Rev. Dr. McVickar, the oldest Presbyter in the Diocese of New York. From sixty to seventy members of the orthodox communion (i. e., the Greek Church) occupied seats near the chancel, and followed the service with close attention, making the sign of the cross
onary Bishop Resident at Constantinople; Rev. Dr. Dix, Rector of Trinity Parish? and Rev. Dr. Thrall, a member of the Russo-Greek Committee, appointed in the General Convention of 1862.--Outside the chancel were other clergy of Trinity Parish, and Rev. Dr. McVickar, the oldest Presbyter in the Diocese of New York. From sixty to seventy members of the orthodox communion (i. e., the Greek Church) occupied seats near the chancel, and followed the service with close attention, making the sign of the cross and inclinations of the head at the proper points. The choir. The choir, which sang admirably, was composed of picked singers, who volunteered their services, and were rehearsed under the direction of Rev. Freeman Young, who brought the music from Russia. It was arranged in four parts, and made available by translating the Slavonian words and sounds into English characters. The members of the choir were Messrs. Thatcher, Leggott, Rockwood, Davies, Camp, Aiken and Trost.
a in Excelsin was sung in English to the familiar chant in G major, to which it is usually sung in our parish churches. The service concludes with another invocation, and the choir again sing the Mnohayah Lyeta, which is the signal for dismissal. Trinity Chapel was crowded, and a large number of the clergy; of the Episcopal Church were present. In the chancel were Bishop Southgate, formerly Missionary Bishop Resident at Constantinople; Rev. Dr. Dix, Rector of Trinity Parish? and Rev. Dr. Thrall, a member of the Russo-Greek Committee, appointed in the General Convention of 1862.--Outside the chancel were other clergy of Trinity Parish, and Rev. Dr. McVickar, the oldest Presbyter in the Diocese of New York. From sixty to seventy members of the orthodox communion (i. e., the Greek Church) occupied seats near the chancel, and followed the service with close attention, making the sign of the cross and inclinations of the head at the proper points. The choir. The choir,
rtal, have mercy upon us. Priest--Wisdom, stand up. Let us hear the holy gospel. Peace to all. The gospel is then announced and the choir sing Slava tebye Hospode Slava tebye, meaning "Glory be to Thee, O Lord; Glory be to Thee." This is also repeated after the gospel is recited. The long Ectene or Litany, containing petitions for the Imperial family, is then read, and is immediately followed by the Eje Cheruveme, or "the Cherubic Hymn," which is thus translated by Mrs. Bowring: I. See the glorious Cherubim Thronging round th' Eternal throne; Hark! thy sing their holy hymn To th' Unknown Three in One, All-supporting Deity; Living Spirit, praise to Thee! II. Rest, ye worldly tumults, rest; Here let all be peace and joy; Grief no more shall rent our breasts, Tears no more shall dew our eye. III. Heaven-directed spirits rise To the temple of the skies! Join the ranks of angels bright Near the Eternal's dazzling light. Hallelujah! Hallelujah! Hallel
Southgate (search for this): article 5
hancel rail, the Bishop, clergy and choir likewise kneeling. At the conclusion of this prayer all rose, and the Gloria in Excelsin was sung in English to the familiar chant in G major, to which it is usually sung in our parish churches. The service concludes with another invocation, and the choir again sing the Mnohayah Lyeta, which is the signal for dismissal. Trinity Chapel was crowded, and a large number of the clergy; of the Episcopal Church were present. In the chancel were Bishop Southgate, formerly Missionary Bishop Resident at Constantinople; Rev. Dr. Dix, Rector of Trinity Parish? and Rev. Dr. Thrall, a member of the Russo-Greek Committee, appointed in the General Convention of 1862.--Outside the chancel were other clergy of Trinity Parish, and Rev. Dr. McVickar, the oldest Presbyter in the Diocese of New York. From sixty to seventy members of the orthodox communion (i. e., the Greek Church) occupied seats near the chancel, and followed the service with close att
and political ceremony. An interesting service took place in New York, on Tuesday, at the Trinity Chapel, with the permission of the Rector of the Parish and the approval of the Bishop of the Diocese. The use of the chapel was offered to Father Agapius, a Greek priest here, for the celebration of the first service held in the United States according the Liturgy of the Russian Church. The day selected for the ceremony — which, in the present state of Yankee diplomatic and national affairell as religious significance — was the anniversary of the coronation of Alexander II, the present Czar of Russia. The Liturgy. The chancel of Trinity Chapel was lighted by tapers in the chandelier and in the candelabrum on the altar. Father Agapius, arrayed in a white robe, trimmed with gold, open in the front and displaying a scarlet scarf, which fell over the breast, began the service according to the regular liturgy by pronouncing the benediction: "Blessed be the kingdom of the
on, and the choir again sing the Mnohayah Lyeta, which is the signal for dismissal. Trinity Chapel was crowded, and a large number of the clergy; of the Episcopal Church were present. In the chancel were Bishop Southgate, formerly Missionary Bishop Resident at Constantinople; Rev. Dr. Dix, Rector of Trinity Parish? and Rev. Dr. Thrall, a member of the Russo-Greek Committee, appointed in the General Convention of 1862.--Outside the chancel were other clergy of Trinity Parish, and Rev. Dr. McVickar, the oldest Presbyter in the Diocese of New York. From sixty to seventy members of the orthodox communion (i. e., the Greek Church) occupied seats near the chancel, and followed the service with close attention, making the sign of the cross and inclinations of the head at the proper points. The choir. The choir, which sang admirably, was composed of picked singers, who volunteered their services, and were rehearsed under the direction of Rev. Freeman Young, who brought the
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