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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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George Hancock (search for this): chapter 8
republic fortunately felt an enthusiasm that was neither turned aside by obstacles nor dismayed by dangers. The future greatness of the country inspired them, and they opposed to the odds against them the intrepidity, the energy, and the intellectual resources, of the martial race they represented. Imagination, displaying itself in action, lent a certain grandeur to the designs of the President and cabinet-heroic wills grappling with an adverse fate. General Johnston, writing to Mr. George Hancock, from Houston, April 21, 1839, says, There is now nothing doubtful in the stability of our institutions or in our ultimate success in the establishment of the independence of the country upon a most auspicious basis. Mirabeau B. Lamar was born in Jefferson County, Georgia, August 16, 1798. He was of Huguenot stock, and of a family which has produced men of note as orators and statesmen. He was already distinguished for eloquence when he came to Texas, in 1835, to aid the constitut
Ellis Bean (search for this): chapter 8
tate. No people could suffer such an invasion without disquietude; and accordingly we find that the empresarios, Messrs. Austin, Milam, and Burnet, early in 1833, addressed a memorial to General Bustamante, calling attention to the facts. Colonel Bean, too, commanding the Eastern Department, made a similar complaint to General Cass, United States Secretary of War, remonstrating against this breach of the treaty of 1831, by which both parties bind themselves expressly to restrain by force alnists and authorities alike attempted to prevent it. The centralists wanted a sprinkling of savages, not a deluge; the colonists objected to their neighborhood altogether. Here the matter seems to have rested until September 11, 1835, when Colonel Bean addressed another letter to the President of the United States, referring to his former communication, and the frequent breaches of the treaty already mentioned; adding, The annoyance to the community, as well as the danger, which has resulted
Mirabeau B. Lamar (search for this): chapter 8
esources. Hopefulness of the Administration. Mirabeau B. Lamar. his policy, financial and educational. vast and organizedence of the country upon a most auspicious basis. Mirabeau B. Lamar was born in Jefferson County, Georgia, August 16, 179ountry, made him the fit choice of Texas as her President. Lamar was a man of high, unbending honor; his native gifts were frust the United States Bank. To the eloquent appeals of Lamar are due the foundation of the educational system of Texas, t, A. Sidney Johnston, Secretary of War. To his Excellency Mirabeau B. Lamar, President of the Republic of Texas. It wasember, 1839, Document A, p. 13. Affairs stood thus when Lamar was inaugurated. The Hon. James Webb, Secretary of State, ed into history by Yoakum, vanishes into thin air. President Lamar's Administration found a host of haughty and cunning she public business beyond its temporary suspension. President Lamar's message, 1839. The venerable Dr. Starr, then Secreta
so natural is it for despotism to ally itself with barbarism, and to seek to depress its intelligent opponents by the aid of an inferior race. That the order to Piedras was obeyed, either technically or substantially, is not probable, as the Indians would not have been satisfied with an allotment of lands in severalty in lieu of the range of country which they hunted over. It served the purpose intended, however; and 50 or 100 Shawnees and Cherokees followed Piedras, the next June, to aid Bradburn, at Anahuac, against Austin's colonists. In the Declaration of Grievances, by the Ayuntamiento of Nacogdoches, the colonists complained that Colonel Piedras had called in and employed Indians, in his meditated warfare on their rights ; and had insulted them by saying that he held Americans and Indians in the same estimation, and as standing on the same footing. Texas Almanac, 1869, p. 39. The Colonization Act of March 24, 1825, admitted Indians as settlers, when any of them, after h
M. B. Menard (search for this): chapter 8
nd children; that they had murdered Brooks Williams, an American trader among them; that they said a large body of Indians, composed of Caddoes, Keechies, Ionies, Tawacanies, Wacocs, and Cornanches, were expected to attack the American settlements; that the Cherokees gave every indication of joining them; that the number of warriors embodied on the Trinity was estimated at 1,700; and that Bolles, the principal Cherokee chief, advised the agents to leave the country, as there was danger. M. B. Menard, who was sent to the Shawnee, Delaware, and Kickapoo tribes, reported that, while these tribes were friendly, they had been visited by Bolles, who urged them to take up arms against the Americans. Yoakum, History of Texas, vol. II., pp. 125-127, In consequence, three companies, numbering 220 men, were detained, and three more were delayed in completing their organization, until it was too late to aid the retreating army under Houston. The women and children were hurried across th
Americans (search for this): chapter 8
otment of lands in severalty in lieu of the range of country which they hunted over. It served the purpose intended, however; and 50 or 100 Shawnees and Cherokees followed Piedras, the next June, to aid Bradburn, at Anahuac, against Austin's colonists. In the Declaration of Grievances, by the Ayuntamiento of Nacogdoches, the colonists complained that Colonel Piedras had called in and employed Indians, in his meditated warfare on their rights ; and had insulted them by saying that he held Americans and Indians in the same estimation, and as standing on the same footing. Texas Almanac, 1869, p. 39. The Colonization Act of March 24, 1825, admitted Indians as settlers, when any of them, after having first declared themselves in favor of our religion and institutions, wish to establish themselves in any settlements that are forming. It has been pretended that the emigrant United States Indians were entitled to lands as colonists under this act; but, when we consider that its inte
John N. Hensford (search for this): chapter 8
ulged the chiefs for a few days, hoping to avoid bloodshed; but this lenity was probably construed into timidity by Bowles, and it soon became apparent that he must be undeceived. A peremptory demand for immediate removal was made; no response came, and our troops moved forward. In the rough draft of the report of the commissioners, part of which is now in the writer's possession, it is stated that on the morning of the 9th of July they dispatched from Kickapoo Town Colonel McLeod, John N. Hensford, Jacob Snively, David Rusk, Colonel Len Williams, Moses L. Patton, and — Robinson, with a communication to Bowles. The party was directed to carry a white flag and proceed to the Indian camp, fifteen or twenty miles distant; but, about five miles from the Indian encampment they met Bowles and twenty-one of his warriors, who came up, whooping and painted, and surrounded the messengers. While Bowles and his warriors were conversing with the messengers, six more Indians joined them and
Bustamante (search for this): chapter 8
e restless and predatory Indians and interior Mexico, it seems a curious coincidence that the Government should begin to accord rights and privileges to savages, just when it was denying them to white men. The usurping Central Administration of Bustamante had, on April 6, 1830, absolutely forbidden the immigration of citizens of the United States, and was then trying to carry out its plan of arbitrary government in Texas. On the 22d of March, 1832, Colonel Piedras was commissioned to put theout the time of General Houston's arrival in the State. No people could suffer such an invasion without disquietude; and accordingly we find that the empresarios, Messrs. Austin, Milam, and Burnet, early in 1833, addressed a memorial to General Bustamante, calling attention to the facts. Colonel Bean, too, commanding the Eastern Department, made a similar complaint to General Cass, United States Secretary of War, remonstrating against this breach of the treaty of 1831, by which both parties
James Love (search for this): chapter 8
on was meted out to the Comanches by Colonel Moore, with a force of ninety Texans and twelve Lipans. He fell upon their village on the Red Fork of the Colorado, 300 miles above Austin, and killed 130 Indians and captured thirty-four, together with about 500 horses. This was the end of Comanche incursions for a long time. Finding war with the Texans so unprofitable, they turned their arms against their late allies of Mexico, and thus became to all intents the unpaid auxiliaries of Texas. Judge Love, writing June 4, 1840, says, The situation of the frontier proves the correctness of the Indian policy. This was the general sentiment, which was strengthened by the Plum Creek victory and Moore's reprisal. Though all the combats with the Comanches herein narrated took place after General Johnston's resignation, their success was the direct result of his more efficient organization of the militia, and the active policy he had inaugurated. General Johnston resigned the War office about t
d heard Fisher's speech, they strung their bows, gave the: war-whoop, and sprang for the door. Howard tried to halt them, motioning them back with a gesture of his hand. The reply was a knife-thrust, stabbing him seriously, and the sentinel was also cut down. He then ordered the soldiers to fire, and, immediately a desperate conflict ensued, in which all the chiefs were killed. When the Comanches outside the building heard the war-whoop within, they at once attacked the people; but Captain Redd's company coming up promptly, they retreated, fighting, toward a stone house, which only one of them succeeded in reaching. All the other warriors, except one renegade Mexican, were killed. Wishing to spare the warrior in the house, the commissioners sent in an Indian woman to tell him: to retire peaceably. This he refused to do ; and, as he could not be safely left where he was, holes were picked in the cement roof, and burning pitch thrown in until he was forced: to leave the house.
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