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Addison O. Whitney (search for this): chapter 56
feeling at the time, the Mayor's conduct was as plucky as anything I have ever read or heard of. His presence, doubtless, saved a great deal of bloodshed. When the Mayor left the head of the column, Marshal Kane, with fifty policemen with drawn revolvers, rushed to the rear of the column, formed a line across the street, and succeeded in keeping back the mob. This was one of the most exciting episodes of the riot. The list of the killed and wounded was as follows: Soldiers killed-Addison O. Whitney, a young mechanic, of Lowell, Massachusetts; Luther C. Ladd, another young mechanic, also from Lowell; Charles A. Taylor, decorative painter, from Boston, and Sumner II. Needham, a plasterer from the same city-4. A number of soldiers were wounded. The citizens killed were: Robert W. Davis, Philip S. Miles, John McCann, John McMahon, William R. Clark, James Carr, Francis Maloney, Sebastian Gill, William Maloney, William Reed, Michael Murphy, Patrick Griffith--12. Wounded-Frank X. Wa
Robert W. Davis (search for this): chapter 56
ame city-4. A number of soldiers were wounded. The citizens killed were: Robert W. Davis, Philip S. Miles, John McCann, John McMahon, William R. Clark, James Carr, The lower classes generally concealed their injuries. The death of Mr. Robert W. Davis was one of the most tragic incidents of the day. Mr. Davis was a member Mr. Davis was a member of the firm of Paynter, Davis & Co., dry goods dealers, on Baltimore street, and one of the most prominent citizens of Baltimore. Early on the morning of the riot Davis & Co., dry goods dealers, on Baltimore street, and one of the most prominent citizens of Baltimore. Early on the morning of the riot he went out on the line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, a short distance from the city, for the purpose of looking at some land which he thought of purchasing. rnalist and lawyer of this city, and who is now City Solicitor of Baltimore. Mr. Davis was not aware that there had been a riot in the city, and as a car containingll asked him if he was hurt. I am killed, was all he said. When the news of Mr. Davis' death reached the city, it added fuel to the flames. Marshal Kane's thre
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 56
s action of the city authorities seemed to be a deliberate note of defiance, and was, probably, the main cause of the bad blood and suspicion which afterward were found to exist. This state of things continued for nearly a month, and no enemy having appeared, the rebellious elements began to tire of playing soldier, and, as had been expected, began to disintegrate. In a few days more the roughs were completely under control, a great many having gone off to Harper's Ferry to join General J. E. Johnston's army there, and the city authorities had resumed their legitimate influence. The arms which had been distributed among the rioters were buried, in order to prevent the wholesale stealing which was found to be going on, and also to prevent them from falling into the hands of irresponsible parties. These arms were afterward recovered by General Butler, who pretended, with an immense flourish of trumpets, that their concealment was part of a rebel plot to get possession of the city.
Frederic Emory (search for this): chapter 56
The Baltimore riots. Frederic Emory. The Baltimore riots of April 18th and 19th, 1861, and the disorders which followed them were, next to the conflict at Fort Sumter, the most exciting and significant of the events which preceded the general outbreak of hostilities between the North and the South. President Lincoln and his Cabinet were seriously inconvenienced, the North was aroused, the leaders of the new Confederacy were led to entertain hopes of valuable assistance from the Border States, and a formidable obstacle was interposed to the active prosecution of those military measures which the government at Washington had decided upon. The attack upon the Massachusetts troops was, in another sense, one of the most remarkable events of the civil war; for, unlike similar disturbances elsewhere, it was largely participated in by the friends of order and the enemies of secession. Parodoxical as the statement may appear, the riots of April, 1861, were the work mainly of the stro
Frank X. Ward (search for this): chapter 56
eir commander was at last exhausted. He cried out in a voice, which was heard even above the yells of the mob, Fire! The soldiers leveled their pieces and the mob seemed to pause, as if to take breath. The soldiers fired. A young man, named F. X. Ward, now a well-known lawyer of this city, fell pierced by a ball. A hoarse yell of fear and rage went up from the mob, but it did not give way. The troops fired again and again, and the crowd wavering, they rushed upon them with fixed bayonets anwere wounded. The citizens killed were: Robert W. Davis, Philip S. Miles, John McCann, John McMahon, William R. Clark, James Carr, Francis Maloney, Sebastian Gill, William Maloney, William Reed, Michael Murphy, Patrick Griffith--12. Wounded-Frank X. Ward, Coney, James Myers, and a boy whose name was not ascertained-4. The fact that more of the troops were not killed is to be ascribed to the fact that the citizens had no arms except paving-stones. Many more of the citizens were wounded besid
Thomas H. Hicks (search for this): chapter 56
mpathies, did everything in their power to prevent bloodshed. The Governor of Maryland, Thomas H. Hicks, was a Union man, although he had been elected as a Pro-slavery Know-Nothing. His loyalty o countenance whatever to the proposed resistance to the Federal invasion. After the event, Governor Hicks was the first man, however, to suggest the armed resistance which he afterward deprecated wiyou? 'Tis too bad. Harford nothing to reproach herself for. Your obedient servant, Thomas H. Hicks. The writer became conspicuously loyal before spring! On the 18th of April, a dispatcowd kept itself up to the requisite pitch of indignation and enthusiasm by groaning for Lincoln, Hicks, and the Federal Government, and by cheering Jefferson Davis and the Southern Confederacy. The oken into all the gun stores in town, and had completely gutted them. During the afternoon, Governor Hicks issued an order for the assembling of the State troops, and by five o'clock quite a number h
E. H. Webster (search for this): chapter 56
e had been elected as a Pro-slavery Know-Nothing. His loyalty was suspected at Washington, but he lent no countenance whatever to the proposed resistance to the Federal invasion. After the event, Governor Hicks was the first man, however, to suggest the armed resistance which he afterward deprecated with so much honor; and, in this connection, I cannot forbear printing the following curious document written by him: State of Maryland, Executive chamber, Annapolis, November 9th, 1860. Hon. E. H. Webster. My Dear Sir :--I have pleasure in acknowledging receipt of your favor introducing a very clever gentleman to my acquaintance (though a Democrat). I regret to say that, at this time, we have no arms on hand to distribute, but assure you that, at the earliest possible moment, your company shall have arms; they have complied with all required of them on their part. We have some delay in consequence of contracts with Georgia and Alabama ahead of us, and we expect, at an early day, an
Edward F. Jones (search for this): chapter 56
om Boston, Lowell, and Acton, Massachusetts, and known as the Sixth Massachusetts Regiment, under the command of Colonel Edward F. Jones, a gallant soldier and courteous gentleman; and a regiment, one thousand strong, from Philadelphia, under the coe flag then began to taunt the troops, and declared that they would be forced to march behind it to the Camden depot. Colonel Jones gave the order to march, and the troops started. The men surrounding the flag, however, planted themselves directly nd the poor wretch was brutally beaten by the rioters before the police could rescue him. When Patch was seen to fall Colonel Jones gave the order double quick to his men, and the whole column started off on a run, ducking and dipping to avoid the shook hands with the officers in command, saying as he did so: I am the Mayor of Baltimore. He then placed himself by Colonel Jones' side, and marched with him for several squares, begging, warning, and commanding the citizens not to offer any viole
April 18th (search for this): chapter 56
ce of contracts with Georgia and Alabama ahead of us, and we expect, at an early day, an additional supply, and of the first received your people shall be furnished. Will they be good men to send out to kill Lincoln and his men? If not, suppose the arms would be better sent South. How does late election sit with you? 'Tis too bad. Harford nothing to reproach herself for. Your obedient servant, Thomas H. Hicks. The writer became conspicuously loyal before spring! On the 18th of April, a dispatch was received in Baltimore from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, announcing that the Northern Central Railroad had been requested to furnish accommodations for the transportation of a number of troops through Baltimore. When the news became generally known, large crowds assembled on the street, and intense excitement reigned. About nine o'clock A. M. a meeting of the military organization known as the Maryland National Volunteers was held under the presidency of Mr. T. Parkin Scot
h as ordinarily accompany poisoning by strychnia. Butler also ordered the arrest of a number of persons for seditious utterances, and actually issued a proclamation concerning one Spencer, who had been heard to express disloyal sentiments, and warning others not to imitate his example. The General seems to have stood in considerable awe of the Baltimore mob, although, at this time, the civil authorities had regained full control of affairs. The following letter from his aide, as late as May 11th, shows that an attack at the Relay House, even then, was feared: camp at Relay, Saturday, P. M. To Mayor Brown: Sir:--I represent General Butler at this camp during his absence at Annapolis. I have received intimations, front many sources, that an attack on us by the Baltimore roughs is intended to-night. About four P. M. to-day these rumors were confirmed by a gentleman from Baltimore, who gave his name and residence in Monument street. He said he heard positively that on Saturday ni
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