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James S. Wadsworth (search for this): chapter 4.42
he movement of troops between it and Willoughby Run, half a mile beyond. South of Major-General Daniel E. Sickles. From a War-time photograph. the Round Top and Devil's Den ridge the country is open, and the principal obstacles to free movement are the fences — generally of stone — which surround the numerous fields. As our troops came up they were assigned to places on the line: the Twelfth Corps, General A. S. Williams,--vice Slocum, commanding the right wing,--to Culp's Hill, on Wadsworth's right; Second Corps to Cemetery Ridge — Hays's and Gibbon's divisions, from Ziegler's to the clump of trees, Caldwell's to the short ridge to its left and rear. This ridge had been occupied by the Third Corps, which was now directed to prolong Caldwell's line to Round Top, relieving Geary's division, which had been stationed during the night on the extreme left, with two regiments at the base of Little Round Top. The Fifth Corps was placed in reserve near the Rock Creek crossing of the <
his grove the distance nearly due south to the base of Little Round Top is a mile and a half. A well-defined ridge known as Cemetery Ridge follows this line from Ziegler's for 900 yards to another small grove, or clump of trees, where it turns sharply to the east for 200 yards, then turns south again, and continues in a direct linmitsburg road runs diagonally across the interval between Cemetery and Seminary ridges, crossing the latter two miles from Ziegler's Grove. From Peach Orchard to Ziegler's is nearly a mile and a half. For half a mile the road runs along a ridge at right angles to that of Devil's Den, which slopes back to Plum Run. The angle at t S. Williams,--vice Slocum, commanding the right wing,--to Culp's Hill, on Wadsworth's right; Second Corps to Cemetery Ridge — Hays's and Gibbon's divisions, from Ziegler's to the clump of trees, Caldwell's to the short ridge to its left and rear. This ridge had been occupied by the Third Corps, which was now directed to prolong C
Edward E. Cross (search for this): chapter 4.42
I was leaving, General Sickles asked me if he should move forward his corps. I answered, Not on my authority; I will report to General Meade for his instructions. I had not reached the wheat-field when a sharp rattle of musketry showed that the enemy held the wood in front of the Peach Orchard angle. As I rode back a view from that direction showed how much farther Peach Orchard was to the front of the direct line than it appeared from the orchard itself. In fact there was a Colonel Edward E. Cross, commanding the First Brigade of Caldwell's division, killed near Devil's Den, July 2. from a photograph. third line between them, which appeared, as seen from the orchard, to be continuous with Cemetery Ridge, but was nearly six hundred yards in front of it. This is the open ground east of Plum Run already described, and which may be called the Plum Run line. Its left where it crosses the run abuts rather on Devil's Den than Round Top; it was commanded by the much higher Peach O
George L. Willard (search for this): chapter 4.42
Run, and Antietam campaigns, had become chief of artillery of his army corps, and at Chancellorsville showed Colonel George L. Willard, commanding the Third Brigade of Hays's division, killed on July 2. from a photograph. such special aptitude e, except the 21st Mississippi, was held in check only by McGilvery's artillery, to whose support Hancock now brought up Willard's brigade of the Second Corps. Placing the 39th New York in reserve, Willard with his other three regiments charged BarWillard with his other three regiments charged Barksdale's brigade and drove it back nearly to the Emmitsburg road,when he was himself repulsed by a heavy artillery and infantry fire, and fell back to his former position near the sources of Plum Run. In this affair Willard was killed and BarksdaleWillard was killed and Barksdale Early's charge on the evening of July 2 upon east Cemetery Hill. mortally wounded. Meanwhile the 21st Mississippi crossed the run from the neighborhood of the Trostle house, and drove out the men of Watson's battery ( I, 5th United States), on
Samuel S. Carroll (search for this): chapter 4.42
nd Rodes should assault Cemetery Hill. Early's attack was made with great spirit, by Hoke's and Avery's brigades, Gordon's being in reserve; the hill was ascended through the wide ravine between Cemetery and Culp's hills, a line of infantry on the slopes was broken, and Wiedrich's Eleventh Corps and Ricketts's reserve batteries near the brow of the hill were overrun; but the excellent position of Stevens's 12-pounders at the head of the ravine, which enabled him to sweep it, the arrival of Carroll's brigade sent unasked by Hancock,--a happy inspiration, as this line had been weakened to send supports both to Greene and Sickles,--and the failure of Rodes to cooperate with Early, caused the attack to miscarry. The cannoneers of the two batteries, so summarily ousted, rallied and recovered their guns by a vigorous attack — with pistols by those who had them, by others with handspikes, rammers, stones, and even fence-rails — the Dutchmen showing that they were in no way inferior to thei
Winfield S. Hancock (search for this): chapter 4.42
y is not infrequently called upon to render, and did render in other instances at Gettysburg besides this one. When Sickles was wounded General Meade directed Hancock to take command of the Third as well as his own corps, which he again turned over to Gibbon. About 7:15 P. M. the field was in a critical condition. Birney's di Anderson's line was advancing. On its right, Barksdale's brigade, except the 21st Mississippi, was held in check only by McGilvery's artillery, to whose support Hancock now brought up Willard's brigade of the Second Corps. Placing the 39th New York in reserve, Willard with his other three regiments charged Barksdale's brigade anun; but the excellent position of Stevens's 12-pounders at the head of the ravine, which enabled him to sweep it, the arrival of Carroll's brigade sent unasked by Hancock,--a happy inspiration, as this line had been weakened to send supports both to Greene and Sickles,--and the failure of Rodes to cooperate with Early, caused the a
John C. Caldwell (search for this): chapter 4.42
y Ridge — Hays's and Gibbon's divisions, from Ziegler's to the clump of trees, Caldwell's to the short ridge to its left and rear. This ridge had been occupied by the Third Corps, which was now directed to prolong Caldwell's line to Round Top, relieving Geary's division, which had been stationed during the night on the extreme leIn fact there was a Colonel Edward E. Cross, commanding the First Brigade of Caldwell's division, killed near Devil's Den, July 2. from a photograph. third line bpened, which was just as he arrived on the ground, General Meade also sent for Caldwell's division from Cemetery Ridge, and a division of the Twelfth Corps from Culp'n of their Brigadier-General Samuel K. Zook, commanding the Third Brigade of Caldwell's division, killed in the wheat-field July 2. from a photograph. View of Round Top), was abandoned; the Third Corps was massed to the left and rear of Caldwell's division, which had reoccupied its short ridge, with McGilvery's artillery o
Richard S. Ewell (search for this): chapter 4.42
Johnson's and Anderson's divisions of the Confederate army were up. Ewell's corps now covered our front from Benner's Hill to the Seminary, h of battle offered by Meade, and to attack as soon as practicable. Ewell had made arrangements to take possession of Culp's Hill in the earlfor Culp's Hill. Johnson thereupon deferred his attack and awaited Ewell's instructions. General Lee had, however; during the night deterattack the Federal left with Longstreet's corps, and now instructed Ewell, as soon as he heard Longstreet's guns, to make a diversion in his line awaiting a division of infantry, and as some demonstrations of Ewell about daylight indicated an immediate attack at that point, I had teneral Meade directed Slocum to hold himself in readiness to attack Ewell with the Fifth and Twelfth, so soon as the Sixth Corps should arrivorps returned to Culp's Hill. When Longstreet's guns were heard, Ewell opened a cannonade, which after an hour's firing was overpowered by
Patrick H. O'Rorke (search for this): chapter 4.42
y moved on us in splendid array, shouting in the most confident tones. While I was still all alone with the signal officer, the musket-balls began to fly around us, and he was about to fold up his flags and withdraw, but remained, at my request, and kept waving them in defiance. Seeing troops going out on t he Peach Orchard road, I rode down the hill, and fortunately met my old brigade. General Weed, commanding it, had already passed the point, and I took the responsibility to detach Colonel O'Rorke, the head of whose regiment I struck, who, on hearing my few words of explanation about the position, moved at once to the hill-top. About this time First Lieutenant Charles E. Hazlett of the Fifth Artillery, with his battery of rifled cannon, arrived. He comprehended the situation instantly and planted a gun on the summit of the hill. He spoke to the effect that though he could do little execution on the enemy with his guns, he could aid in giving confidence to the infantry, and tha
Romeyn B. Ayres (search for this): chapter 4.42
the body of one of them, tearing it to pieces; others were torn and wounded. All were stampeded, and were bellowing and rushing in their terror, first to one side and then to the other, to escape the shells that were bursting over them and among them. Cross I must, and in doing so I had my most trying experience of that battle-field. Luckily the poor beasts were as much frightened as I was, but their rage was subdued by Brigadier-General Stephen H. Weed, commanding the Third Brigade of Ayres's division, killed July 2. from a photograph. General Weed was picked off by sharp-shooters at Devil's Den soon after getting his brigade in position on Little Round Top.--editors. Trostle's farm, the scene of the fighting by Bigelow's Ninth Massachusetts Battery. From a War-time photograph. terror, and they were good enough to let me pass through scot-free, but badly demoralized. However, my horse was safe, I mounted, and in the busy excitement that followed almost forgot my scar
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