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Margaret Gardiner (search for this): chapter 6
r right hand was entirely useless--dead, as she aptly called it. One finger had been cut off by a doctor, and the auctioneer stated that she herself chopped off the other finger — her forefinger — because it hurt her, and she thought that to cut it off would cure it. This remark raised a laugh among the crowd. I looked at her, and expected to see a stupid-looking creature, low browed and sensual in appearance; but was surprised, instead, to see a woman with an eye which reminded me of Margaret Gardiner (whom I visited in Cincinnati), but more resolute, intelligent and impulsive. She was perfectly black; but her eye was Saxon, if by Saxon we mean a hell-defying courage, which neither death nor the devil can terrify. It was an eye that will never die in a slave's socket, or never die a natural death in so unworthy an abode. Did n't you cut your finger off, asked a man, kase you was mad? She looked at him quietly, but with a glance of contempt, and said: No, you see it was a
the turnpike about three miles from Warrenton. We had passed through two or three hamlets — New Baltimore and Buckland I remember — but they did not afford anything worthy of notice. I walked, through a drenching rain, to Warrenton, which is a pleasant country village. In entering it, I asked for the best hotel. I was directed down the street. On looking up at the swinging sign, I read, with astonishment, this horrible announcement, equally laconic as impious and improper: Warren Green HEl Nothing daunted, I ventured, with perfect recklessness — or in the spirit of the Six Hundred of Balaklava — into the very month — the open door-way — of this terrestrial H El. Astonished to find a room in it without a, fire, I instantly ordered one, regardless of consequences. And here I am, for once, in a very snug old room, with a blazing wood fire, as comfortable as a Boston traveller can be, at so great a distance from the old folks to hum and the mellifluous nasal melod
se satisfied nearly all, but several still seemed disposed to maintain that negro evidence, as against abolitionists, was as good as good need be. Up jumped Capt. Wallace, a fierce, very vulgar-looking bully, with a pistol stuck conspicuously in his belt. I move, he shouted, that he be given fifty lashes. Another fellow movelittle children and the dogs; feathers enough to have given the prisoner a dozen warm coats, and left sufficient for a pair of winter pantaloons. Now! said Capt. Wallace to Atkinson, in a savage tone, now, stranger, to save trouble, off with your shirt! With imperturbable coolness, and without opening his lips, the prisoner o d — d easy, said a second. That's a fact, chimed a third. By this time the prisoner was entirely naked, from the loins upward. Come out here, said Captain Wallace, we don't want to smear the floor with tar. Silently and carelessly Atkinson followed him. A ruffian named Bird, and the wretch who proposed to burn the
e best and most profitable thing they could do, and advised me to go and see a Mr. Deming, a New York farmer, who had come into this neighborhood recently, and employ as your busy time is about commencing. Northern emigrants. I visited Mr. Deming's farm, and walked over it. He has been here about four years. He paid $27 peeem. This experiment augurs well for Eli's great enterprise. It costs less--Mr. Deming says — to redeem worn-out estates than to hew down the aboriginal forests; anvilization, the Virginia farms are much more valuable than Western claims. Mr. Deming had found the experiment of free labor to work well; he finds little difficulion around him the same experiment is in course of trial. I am indebted to Mr. Deming and his wife for hospitable entertainment. and much valuable information. Notes by the way. After dinner at Mr. Deming's, I rode back to Alexandria, for a valued casket I had forgotten, but immediately returned and resumed my journey af
A. H. Chew (search for this): chapter 6
happy effects of the extension of slavery over virgin territories, in raising the price of Personal Estate in the Southern section of the Republic. The price of slaves in Fairfax County is the same as here given. Sale of servants.-- A. H. Chew and R. B. Chew, administrators of the late Leonard H. Chew, sold, on Thursday last, part of the personal estate belonging to the deceased, consisting of several servants. The sales were as follows: One woman and two small girls sold for $1, $700, and was purchased by Daniel C. Digges, Esq. Girl, about 14 years of age, sold for $900, and was purchased by John F. Pickrell, Esq., of Baltimore. Two small girls sold, one for $880, and the other for $550, and were purchased by Mrs. A. H. Chew. My room. Tired with the bar-room and the county papers, I asked to be conducted to my room. It is one of a series of ten, contained in the upper part of a wing, one room deep, the lower or ground part of which is either the cooking
d Richmond Examiner. auction sales. this day. by Dickinson, Hill & Co., Auctioneers. 10 negroes.--Will be sold by us, this morning at 10 o'clock, 10 likely negroes. may 24 Dickinson, Hill & Co., Aucts. auction sales. by Pulliam & Davis, Auctioneers. 8 negroes.--This day, at 10 o'clock, we will sell 8 likely negroes, Men, Boys, and Girls. may 24. Pulliam & Davis, Aucts. Dickinson, Hill & Company, body-sellers and body-buyers, subject only to the ConstitutioPulliam & Davis, Aucts. Dickinson, Hill & Company, body-sellers and body-buyers, subject only to the Constitution, carry on their nefarious business in Wall street — I believe its name is — within pistol shot of the capitol of Virginia and its executive mansion. Near their auction-room, on the opposite side of the street, is the office of another person engaged in the same inhuman traffic, who has painted, in bold Roman letters, on a signboard over the door: E. A. G. Clopton Agent, For Hiring Out Negroes, and Renting Out Houses. Both negroes and houses, by the laws of Virginia, are held, adj
Partington (search for this): chapter 6
y one, pay a thousand dollars for him ; he goes off, and fights or sprees, and the first thing you know your thousand dollar's dead! The old man did not think himself that slave labor paid, and believed it would be better for the white men, as well as the negro, if slavery was instantly and everywhere abolished. I was too tired, when I talked with him, to report his remarks stenographically, as I generally do. I regret it now, for his idiom was exceedingly unique and humorous. If Mrs. Partington ever meets him she will have to hide her diminished head forever. Ignorance. The ignorance of both the poor whites and blacks is almost incredible; even to the traveller who has daily and astonishing evidences of it. I have sometimes asked negroes who have lived near a village all their life, if they knew what its population was; and they could not understand what population meant nor — when explained to them — could they answer my question. Like Socrates, they seemed only to kno
conversation with a prominent politician of the town, on the plan of Eli Thayer, to colonize Virginia by free white laborers. He launched out into an ocean — or perhaps mud-puddle would be the apter phrase — of political invective against the black republicans and abolitionists of the North. He regarded Mr. Thayer as a braggadocio — a fool — or a political trickster — who merely threatened Virginia for effect at home. He couldn't think he was in earnest. I told him that Stringfellow and Atchison had said that had it not been for Mr. Thayer, and his Emigrant Aid scheme, Kansas ere this would have been a slave State. Then, sir, said the politician, sternly, if he comes to Virginia with such a reputation, he will be met as he deserves — expelled instantly or strung up. He did not believe that a single responsible citizen of Virginia would aid or countenance his scheme of colonization. He did not believe that Virginia had contributed $60,000 of stock to the Company. Mr. Un
is men who know how to till the soil, without exhausting its strength. Centreville is a hamlet of twenty or thirty houses. As I entered it, yesterday afternoon, half-a-dozen negroes were playing at ball--Sunday is their holiday — and over twenty white loafers were congregated in different parts of the place. Of their domestic industry I saw not the faintest indication, excepting only several very handsome mulatto women and children. Every house in the hamlet looks as if it could recollect Noah, when he was a sucking child, and had been inhabited by ladies of the Mrs. McClarty tribe from time immemorial. On my way from Centreville hither, I saw rye in the ear. The woods look very beautiful. Amalgamation. The abolitionists, it is well known in Congress — I mean in the Democratic ranks — are, all of them, negro-worshippers and amalgamationists. If they alone, or chiefly, are the fathers of mulattoes, Fairfax county, Henrietta county, and every part of Virginia I have visited<
E. G. W. Hall (search for this): chapter 6
slavery over virgin territories, in raising the price of Personal Estate in the Southern section of the Republic. The price of slaves in Fairfax County is the same as here given. Sale of servants.-- A. H. Chew and R. B. Chew, administrators of the late Leonard H. Chew, sold, on Thursday last, part of the personal estate belonging to the deceased, consisting of several servants. The sales were as follows: One woman and two small girls sold for $1,450, and were purchased by E. G. W. Hall, Esq. Boy, about 15 years of age, sold for $915, and was purchased by Wm. Z. Beall, Esq. Small boy sold for $700, and was purchased by Daniel C. Digges, Esq. Girl, about 14 years of age, sold for $900, and was purchased by John F. Pickrell, Esq., of Baltimore. Two small girls sold, one for $880, and the other for $550, and were purchased by Mrs. A. H. Chew. My room. Tired with the bar-room and the county papers, I asked to be conducted to my room. It is one of a seri
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