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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. Search the whole document.

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July 18th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 6
iment. Killed. Wounded. Total. 9th Louisiana 62 130 192 11th Louisiana 30 120 150 1st Mississippi 3 21 24 23d Iowa (white) 26 60 86 With the wounded are included those who were mortally wounded. Captain Miller, of the Ninth Louisiana, Brown: Negro in the Rebellion. states that his regiment had only 300 men engaged, and that the whole force of the garrison was about 600 men. The next action in which colored troops were engaged was the grand assault on Fort Wagner, July 18, 1863. To the 54th Massachusetts Colored was assigned the honor of leading the attack, and after the troops were formed on the beach, ready for the assault, the order to advance was withheld until the Fifty-fourth could march by and take position at the head of the column. The assault failed; but, not until the Colonel of the Fifty-fourth and many of his men had fallen dead on the parapet, or within the fort. The loss of the regiment in this affair was--3 officers and 31 men killed, 11 offi
November 10th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 6
taken in South Carolina by General Hunter, and an officer, Sergeant C. T. Trowbridge, had been detailed for that purpose as early as May 7, 1862. The recruiting progressed slowly, and was attended with so many difficulties and discouragements that a complete regimental organization was not effected until Jan. 31, 1863. Some of the companies, however, were organized at an earlier date. Colonel T. W. Higginson was assigned to the command of this regiment, his commission dating back to November 10, 1862. Trowbridge was made Captain of the first company organized, and subsequently promoted to the Lieutenant-Colonelcy. This regiment, First South Carolina, was the first slave regiment organized, the Louisiana Native Guard having been recruited largely from free blacks. The designation of the First South Carolina was changed by the War Department, in February, 1864, to Thirty-third United States Colored Infantry. Recruiting for the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts commenced in February, 1
February, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 6
mber 10, 1862. Trowbridge was made Captain of the first company organized, and subsequently promoted to the Lieutenant-Colonelcy. This regiment, First South Carolina, was the first slave regiment organized, the Louisiana Native Guard having been recruited largely from free blacks. The designation of the First South Carolina was changed by the War Department, in February, 1864, to Thirty-third United States Colored Infantry. Recruiting for the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts commenced in February, 1863, and its ten companies were full by May. It was the fist colored regiment raised in a Northern State, the First Kansas having been recruited largely in Missouri, and partly from enslaved blacks. The Fifty-fourth was composed mostly of free men, and its recruits came from all the Northern States, it being their first opportunity to enlist. By this time the movement had become general, and before the war closed the colored troops embraced 145 regiments of infantry, 7 of cavalry, 12 of
May 27th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 6
ich colored troops were engaged was an affair at Island Mounds, Mo., October 28, 1862, in which a detachment of the First Kansas was attacked by a superior number of Confederates under command of Colonel Cockerel. Although outnumbered, they made a successful resistance and scored a victory. Their loss was 10 killed, including a Captain, and 12 wounded The First Kansas, also, lost 16 men killed on May 18, 1863, in a minor engagement at Sherwood, Mo. In the assault on Port Hudson, La., May 27, 1863, colored troops were used for the first time in a general engagement. The Nineteenth Army Corps, during its besiegement of that stronghold, included several colored regiments in its organization. There were the First and Third Louisiana Native Guards; The First Louisiana Engineers, Corps d'afrique; and, the Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth and Tenth Infantry, Corps d'afrique. During the siege the First Louisiana Native Guards lost 2 officers and 32 men killed, and 3 officers and 92 men wo
June 15th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 6
n in 1864, colored troops were a common feature of the armies before Richmond. Ferrero's Division of the Ninth Corps, and Hinks' Division of the Eighteenth Corps, were composed entirely of black regiments. In the first attack on Petersburg, June 15, 1864, Hinks' Division achieved a brilliant success, capturing the line of works in its front, and seven pieces of artillery. Had the Army of the Potomac arrived in time to follow up the success of the colored troops, Petersburg would have been tad Infantry 21 87   108 38th U. S. Colored Infantry 17 94   111 The Sixth had only 367 officers and men engaged, its loss being over 57 per cent. The troops in Paine's Division were the same ones which carried the works at Petersburg, June 15, 1864. In the action on the Darbytown Road, Va., October 27, 1864, the Twenty-ninth Connecticut (colored) distinguished itself by the efficiency with which it held a skirmish line for several hours, under a strong pressure. Loss, 11 killed and
April 9th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 6
nt on that field occurred in the Thirteenth U. S. Colored Infantry, which, in its assault on Overton Hill, lost 55 killed (including 4 officers), and 166 wounded; Includes the mortally wounded. total, 221. The severest loss at the battle of Honey Hill, S. C., November 30, 1864, fell on a black regiment, the Fifty-fifth Massachusetts, which lost in that action, 29 killed, and 115 wounded; total, 144. In the closing battle of the war — the victorious assault on Fort Blakely, Ala., April 9, 1865--a colored division bore a conspicuous and honorable part. Among the casualties in that engagement the following are worthy of note: Regiment. Killed. Wounded. Includes the mortally wounded. Missing Total. 68th U. S. Colored Infantry 10 91 -- 101 76th U. S. Colored Infantry 13 78 -- 91 In addition to the battles heretofore mentioned, colored troops were prominently engaged in the following actions: Morris Island. S. C. James Island, S. C. Liverpool Heights, Miss.
number of the killed was increased to 87 by those who died of wounds,and certain ones who were erroneously included with the missing. This same regiment distinguished itself, also, at Chaffin's Farm. Upon the opening of the spring campaign in 1864, colored troops were a common feature of the armies before Richmond. Ferrero's Division of the Ninth Corps, and Hinks' Division of the Eighteenth Corps, were composed entirely of black regiments. In the first attack on Petersburg, June 15, 1864,n. Natural Bridge, Fla. Morganzia, La. Jacksonville, Fla. Brice's X Roads, Miss. Tupelo, Miss. Athens, Ala. Drewry's Bluff, Va. Bermuda Hundred, Va. Dutch Gap, Va. Deep Bottom, Va. Darbytown Road, Va. Hatcher's Run, Va. Fair Oaks, Va. (1864) Saltville, Va. Deveaux Neck, S. C. Boykin's Mills, S. C. Cox's Bridge, N. C. Fort Fisher, N. C. Wilmington, N. C. Spanish Fort, Ala. Fall of Richmond. Appomattox, Va. They rendered effective and meritorious services in many of thes
May 18th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 6
, they failed to win victories, it was through no fault of theirs. The first action in which colored troops were engaged was an affair at Island Mounds, Mo., October 28, 1862, in which a detachment of the First Kansas was attacked by a superior number of Confederates under command of Colonel Cockerel. Although outnumbered, they made a successful resistance and scored a victory. Their loss was 10 killed, including a Captain, and 12 wounded The First Kansas, also, lost 16 men killed on May 18, 1863, in a minor engagement at Sherwood, Mo. In the assault on Port Hudson, La., May 27, 1863, colored troops were used for the first time in a general engagement. The Nineteenth Army Corps, during its besiegement of that stronghold, included several colored regiments in its organization. There were the First and Third Louisiana Native Guards; The First Louisiana Engineers, Corps d'afrique; and, the Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth and Tenth Infantry, Corps d'afrique. During the siege the F
November 24th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 6
s same time General Butler took the initiative in the enlistment of colored men as soldiers, by organizing at new Orleans the regiments known as the Louisiana Native Guards, one of which completed its organization in August, 1862, and was mustered into service on the 27th of the following month. It was designated the First Louisiana Native Guard, and was the first black regiment to join the Union Army. The Second Louisiana Native Guard was mustered in, October 12, 1862; the Third, on November 24, 1862. The other regiments of the Guard, or Corps d'afrique as it was called, completed their organizations within a few months later. At this time, also, in August, 1862, recruiting for a colored regiment was commenced in Kansas, and over 600 men were soon mustered in. The regiment, however, was not mustered into the United States service until January 13, 1863. It was then designated the First Kansas Colored Volunteers, but its name was changed, in December, 1864, to the 79th United S
May 7th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 6
ommenced in Kansas, and over 600 men were soon mustered in. The regiment, however, was not mustered into the United States service until January 13, 1863. It was then designated the First Kansas Colored Volunteers, but its name was changed, in December, 1864, to the 79th United States Colored Infantry. Recruiting for a black regiment had, also, been undertaken in South Carolina by General Hunter, and an officer, Sergeant C. T. Trowbridge, had been detailed for that purpose as early as May 7, 1862. The recruiting progressed slowly, and was attended with so many difficulties and discouragements that a complete regimental organization was not effected until Jan. 31, 1863. Some of the companies, however, were organized at an earlier date. Colonel T. W. Higginson was assigned to the command of this regiment, his commission dating back to November 10, 1862. Trowbridge was made Captain of the first company organized, and subsequently promoted to the Lieutenant-Colonelcy. This regime
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