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Browsing named entities in a specific section of James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Thomas W. Sherman (search for this): chapter 6
Remarkable as it may seem, it was the Confederacy that made the first move in the game of blockade. The State of Virginia attempted to close the Potomac and to prevent egress and ingress to the national capital. A total lack of naval force prevented such accomplishment. But the Federal navy's blockade of the Southern ports became ultimately the determining factor in the downfall of the Confederacy. Vicksburg and Port Hudson surrendered as much to Farragut and to Porter as to Grant. Sherman's march to the sea would never have been undertaken had not the Federal fleets already held possession of Port Royal and so strongly invested the harbors of Savannah, Charleston, and Wilmington. In his campaign against Richmond, McClellan sought shelter under the guns of the navy, and Grant was enabled, through the navy's control of the coast, to maintain his base at City Point. Had Jefferson Davis a navy at his command, the result of the internecine struggle might have been far differe
the one removed, at the outbreak of hostilities, by the Confederates. The outlying navy-yard — Hilton Head, 1862 The outlying navy-yard — Hilton Head, 1862--the anchor rack Monitor at Port Royal convoying lightship One was the Atlantic Blockading Squadron, of twenty-two vessels carrying two hundred and ninety-six guns and thirty-five hundred men under Flag-Officer Stringham, who had for his field of operations the whole of the Atlantic coast from Norfolk to Cape Florida. Flag-Officer Mervine had been given command of the other squadron, whose department was the Gulf. Here were twenty-one vessels, carrying two hundred and eighty-two guns and thirty-four hundred men. As fast as new ships could be built or old ships bought and repaired, these squadrons were reenforced. During the war more than two hundred vessels were built and more than four hundred purchased. As has been noticed before, in the chapter on Federal Organization, there were more officers in the navy at the
Paul Jones (search for this): chapter 6
below), rating something over five hundred tons, was active throughout the war. In April, 1862, under the command of Lieutenant S. Nicholson, she was in the Chesapeake aiding McClellan in his operations before Yorktown. In February, 1863, she joined the blockading squadron, and under Lieutenant-Commanders R. W. Scott and R. W. Meade, Jr., she participated in the operations in the vicinity of Charleston, supporting the movements up the Stono River and the attacks on Morris Island. The Paul Jones The trim gunboat Marblehead beyond belief were made by the owners of these vessels which were mostly built in Great Britain and were the fastest steaming craft of their day. They were loaded with arms, ammunition, and other supplies needed by the Confederacy, and departed on the return voyage loaded down to their gunwales with cotton. It is a question whether, in the main, the traffic was successful, for so many of these greyhounds were captured by the blockading fleets, and destroye
Charles Wilkes (search for this): chapter 6
to search for Confederate privateers and blockade-runners. She made numerous prizes and was subsequently transferred to Wilkes' flying squadron. She was finally attached to Admiral Porter's South Atlantic squadron and took part in both attacks on In 1862-3 he was in command of the East Gulf blockading squadron and in 1864 of the West Indian squadron. Rear-Admiral Charles Wilkes, U. S. N. A nephew of the celebrated John Wilkes of London, this officer in 1838-42 led the exploring expedWest Indies, looking for the Confederate cruiser Sumter, and seized the opportunity for what appeared to be bigger game. Wilkes was thanked by Congress and applauded by the people of the North, but his act nearly brought on a war with England. On Ad of a flotilla, he destroyed City Point, which was later to become the army base in the closing operations in Virginia. Wilkes afterward did excellent service with his famous flying squadron, capturing blockade-runners in the West Indian waters.
Gershom J. Brunt (search for this): chapter 6
d to General Beauregard. The latter did everything in his power to force this claim upon the attention of foreign governments, for if the consuls of European nations at Charleston would have acted upon such representation, it would have been necessary for the Federal Government to have established a fresh blockade in accordance with the laws of nations. However, to put it briefly, although this intrepid exploit came as a thunderclap to the North, the great Federal armada had Commodore Gershom J. Van Brunt, U. S. N. The gallant commander of the Minnesota. He and his ship were early in the thick of things and served under Rear-Admiral Goldsborough at Hatteras Inlet. Made commodore July 16, 1862, Van Brunt was actively engaged in blockade duty during the rest of the war. Rear-Admiral James L. Lardner, U. S. N. In command of the steam frigate Susquehanna, he formed an active part of Admiral Du Pont's circle of fire at Port Royal, November 7, 1861. In 1862-3 he was in comma
Gulf Squadron also was divided: Flag-Officer McKean took command of the East Gulf from Cape Canaveral to Pensacola, and Flag-Officer Farragut was assigned to the command of the West Gulf from Pensacola to Matamoras. When Port Royal was taken by Du Pont and Farragut had captured New Orleans, the navy had not only established bases but had entered wedges into the very vitals of the Confederacy. After holding the command of the North Atlantic Squadron for little short of a year, Admiral Goldsborliantly carried out. Forming his fleet in a long line, he, in the Wabash, boldly led it in an elliptical course past first one Fort and then the other, completing this terrible circle of fire three times till the Confederate guns were silenced. Du Pont's plan of battle became a much followed precedent for the navy during the war, for by it he had won his victory with a loss of but eight killed and twenty-three wounded. A midshipman at the age of twelve, he had got his training in the old navy.
enough to start the enterprise with a handsome profit. A blockade-runner like the Kate, which made forty trips or more, would enrich her owners almost beyond the dreams of avarice. The remains of the Ruby soon after her capture by U. S. S. Proteus, February, 1865 Here on the beach of Morris Island lies all that was left of the swift and doughty blockade-runner Ruby. She was one of the most successful of her kind. She was busy early in 1862, plying between Nassau and Charleston. Not until February 27, 1865, while trying to get in with an assorted cargo of the type usually denominated hardware, was she at last entrapped. The Federal screw-steamer Proteus, Commander R. W. Shufeldt, picked up her scent and gave chase, with the result seen in the picture. It was for taking such risks as these that the captains of the blockade-runners received $5,000 a month instead of the $150 which was the prevailing rate in the merchant service before the war. Officers and crews were paid
C. R. P. Rodgers (search for this): chapter 6
ion to recapture Fort Sumter and secure possession of Charleston. The task proved an impossible one. But Dahlgren in cooperation with the military forces captured Morris Island and drew the cordon of the blockade closer about Charleston. Admiral Dahlgren was the inventor of a new form of cannon. He also introduced the light boat-howitzers which proved so useful in the blockading service. Admiral Du Pont and staff, on board the Wabash, off Savannah, 1863 From left to right: Capt. C. R. P. Rodgers, fleet captain; Rear-Adm. S. F. Du Pont, commanding fleet; Commander Thomas G. Corbin, commanding Wabash ; Lieutenant Samuel W. Preston, flag-lieutenant; Admiral's Secretary McKinley; Paymaster John S. Cunningham; Lieut. Alexander Slidell McKenzie; Fleet Surgeon George Clymer; Lieut. James P. Robertson; Ensign Lloyd Phenix; Commander William Reynolds, Store-Ship Vermont ; Lieut.-Com. John S. Barnes, Executive Officer. Rear-Admiral Samuel Francis Du Post was the man who first made th
G. W. Frost (search for this): chapter 6
ckading squadron. Old veterans like the R. E. Lec and the Kate plied with the precision of regular packets. At Havana the blockade-runners were more frequent callers than the regular merchantmen between that city and New York. The Fort Donelson, while in the Federal navy, on August 15, 1864, under command of Acting Vol. Lieut. T. Pickering, captured a suspicious-looking vessel, the Dacotah, but she was subsequently released. In January, 1865, the Fort Donelson, under command of Acting Master G. W. Frost, took part in the expedition against Fort Fisher, which dealt such a heavy blow at blockade-running, the business in which she was formerly engaged. There are two kinds of blockades — military and commercial. A military blockade is merely the equivalent, on the part of a naval force, of that of a siege upon land, and has been practised from the very earliest times. Commercial blockades are instituted with the principal object of stopping an enemy's imports, crippling his tra
T. Pickering (search for this): chapter 6
d Nassau half a dozen at a time at favorable opportunities, with a regularity and despatch that the Northern newspapers of the day were fond of commending to the blockading squadron. Old veterans like the R. E. Lec and the Kate plied with the precision of regular packets. At Havana the blockade-runners were more frequent callers than the regular merchantmen between that city and New York. The Fort Donelson, while in the Federal navy, on August 15, 1864, under command of Acting Vol. Lieut. T. Pickering, captured a suspicious-looking vessel, the Dacotah, but she was subsequently released. In January, 1865, the Fort Donelson, under command of Acting Master G. W. Frost, took part in the expedition against Fort Fisher, which dealt such a heavy blow at blockade-running, the business in which she was formerly engaged. There are two kinds of blockades — military and commercial. A military blockade is merely the equivalent, on the part of a naval force, of that of a siege upon land,
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