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gton at Princeton; was with Howe on the Brandywine and in the capture of Philadelphia, when he returned to England, but soon came back; was at the capture of Charleston in May, 1780; was commander of the British troops in the Carolinas that year; defeated Gates near Camden in August; fought Greene at Guildford Court-house early in 1781; invaded Virginia, and finally took post at and fortified Yorktown, on the York River, and there surrendered his army to the American and French forces in October, 1781. He was appointed governor-general and commander-in-chief in India in 1786; and was victorious in war there in 1791-92, compelling Tippoo Saib to cede, as the price of peace, half his dominions to the British crown. He returned to England in 1793; was created a marquis; and appointed lord-lieutenant of Ireland in 1798. He negotiated the treaty of Amiens in 1802, and was governor-general of India in 1805. He died at Ghazipoor, India, Oct. 5, 1805. In 1776 Sir Henry Clinton waited l
as a prisoner of war, with all his troops, and all public property as spoils of victory. All slaves and plunder found in possession of the British might be reclaimed by their owners; otherwise private property was to be respected. The loyalists were abandoned to the mercy or resentment of their countrymen. Such were the general terms; but Cornwallis was allowed to send away persons most obnoxious to the Whigs in the vessel that carried despatches to Clinton. Late in the afternoon of Oct. 19, the surrender of the British troops took place. Washington and Rochambeau were at the head of their respective troops, on horseback. The field of surrender was about half a mile from the British lines. A vast multitude of people, equal in numbers to the troops to be humiliated, was present at the impressive ceremony. Cornwallis, it was said, feigned sickness, and did not appear, but sent his sword by General O'Hara to act as his representative. That officer led the vanquished troops o
ok post at and fortified Yorktown, on the York River, and there surrendered his army to the American and French forces in October, 1781. He was appointed governor-general and commander-in-chief in India in 1786; and was victorious in war there in 1791-92, compelling Tippoo Saib to cede, as the price of peace, half his dominions to the British crown. He returned to England in 1793; was created a marquis; and appointed lord-lieutenant of Ireland in 1798. He negotiated the treaty of Amiens in 1802, and was governor-general of India in 1805. He died at Ghazipoor, India, Oct. 5, 1805. In 1776 Sir Henry Clinton waited long on the Cape Fear River for the arrival of Sir Peter Parker's fleet with Cornwallis and a reinforcement of troops. They came early in May and soon prepared to make an attack on Charleston. Clinton received, by the fleet, instructions from his King to issue a proclamation of pardon to all but principal instigators and abettors of the rebellion, to dissolve the pro
Cornwallis, Lord Charles 1738-1805 Military officer; born in London, Dec. 31, 1738; was educated at Eton and Cambridge, and entered the army as captain when twenty years of age. In the House of Lords he opposed the measures that caused the war with the Americans; yet he accepted the commission of major-general and the command of an expedition against the Carolinas under Sir Peter Parker in 1776. He commanded the reserves of the British in the battle on Long Island in August; was outgeneralled by Washington at Princeton; was with Howe on the Brandywine and in the capture of Philadelphia, when he returned to England, but soon came back; was at the capture of Charleston in May, 1780; was commander of the British troops in the Carolinas that year; defeated Gates near Camden in August; fought Greene at Guildford Court-house early in 1781; invaded Virginia, and finally took post at and fortified Yorktown, on the York River, and there surrendered his army to the American and French for
t to leave the North Carolina coast, Clinton sent Lord Cornwallis, at the instigation of Governor Martin, to burn the house of Hooper, a delegate in the Continental Congress, and to burn and ravage the plantation of Gen. Robert Howe. Cornwallis landed in Brunswick county with about 900 men. Lord Cornwallis (from an English print). and proceeded to his assigned work. In this ignoble expedition—his first in America—he lost two men killed and one taken prisoner. Clinton, in a proclamation (May 5), invited the people to appease the vengeance of an incensed nation by submission, and offered pardon to all, excepting General Howe and Cornelius Harnett. Howe sent Cornwallis in November, 1777, with a strong body of troops, by way of Chester, to Billingsport to clear the New Jersey banks of the Delaware. Washington immediately sent General Greene with a division across the river to oppose the movement. Cornwallis was reinforced by five British battalions front New York, while expected
rly in 1781; invaded Virginia, and finally took post at and fortified Yorktown, on the York River, and there surrendered his army to the American and French forces in October, 1781. He was appointed governor-general and commander-in-chief in India in 1786; and was victorious in war there in 1791-92, compelling Tippoo Saib to cede, as the price of peace, half his dominions to the British crown. He returned to England in 1793; was created a marquis; and appointed lord-lieutenant of Ireland in 1798. He negotiated the treaty of Amiens in 1802, and was governor-general of India in 1805. He died at Ghazipoor, India, Oct. 5, 1805. In 1776 Sir Henry Clinton waited long on the Cape Fear River for the arrival of Sir Peter Parker's fleet with Cornwallis and a reinforcement of troops. They came early in May and soon prepared to make an attack on Charleston. Clinton received, by the fleet, instructions from his King to issue a proclamation of pardon to all but principal instigators and a
Cornwallis, Lord Charles 1738-1805 Military officer; born in London, Dec. 31, 1738; was educated at Eton and Cambridge, and entered the army as captain when twenty years of age. In the House of Lords he opposed the measures that caused the war with the Americans; yet he accepted the commission of major-general and the command of an expedition against the Carolinas under Sir Peter Parker in 1776. He commanded the reserves of the British in the battle on Long Island in August; was outgeneralled by Washington at Princeton; was with Howe on the Brandywine and in the capture of Philadelphia, when he returned to England, but soon came back; was at the capture of Charleston in May, 1780; was commander of the British troops in the Carolinas that year; defeated Gates near Camden in August; fought Greene at Guildford Court-house early in 1781; invaded Virginia, and finally took post at and fortified Yorktown, on the York River, and there surrendered his army to the American and French forc
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