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McDougall (search for this): article 9
erstood there were three plans. One was that of General Rosecranz, to go by the valley of the Shenandoah to Richmond, and he (Mr. Wilson) believed that the Secretary of War approved of this plan. Another plan was to go down to Richmond by way of the Rappahannock. The third plan was to go to Richmond by way of the Peninania, which was the plan of General McClellan. The resolution of Mr. Chandler was then passed, by yeas 39, nays 6. Nays--Messrs. Anthony, Foster, Lane of Kansas, McDougall, Saulsbury, and Wright. The bill relative to calling out the militia, with the amendments authorizing the arming of the blacks, their employment on entrenchments, &c., and freeing the wife, mother, and children of negroes so employed, was then called up. A motion to postpone indefinitely was disagreed to by a vote of nine against twenty seven. An amendment that loyal persons shall be compensated for loss of service of slaves taken under the bill was agreed to. The section autho
when they were informed that they must return to the hospital again, and be left there as prisoners, their grief was indescribable, especially among those who were sick. The scene was heart-rending. The steamer Canonious was fired into yesterday by the rebels, a few miles this side of Harrison's Landing. No damage done. Notwithstanding our gunboats are stationed at intervals of three miles along that portion of the river, yet the rebels, with about six field pieces, dodge down near the river and fire into our transports every day. They fire and run away before the gunboats can bring their guns to bear on them. Fortress Monroe, July 9, 1862. --All is quiet in the army. Nothing is going on except throwing up breastworks and clearing away trees. Among the prisoners at the hospital on the York river, held by the rebels, is Mrs. E. K. Parlin. Dr. Bradly interceded with the rebels for the release of this lady, but to no avail, they turning a deaf ear to his entreaties.
. On taking the question on the section giving freedom to the mother, wife, and children of negroes so employed by the Government, there was no quorum, and the Senate adjourned. A Federal Disaster. The New York Herald, of the 11th, says: Dispatches from Nashville, dated the 9th inst., report that four companies of the 9th Pennsylvania cavalry were surprised and cut up at daybreak on that morning at Tompkinsville, by a party of one thousand five hundred rebel cavalry, under Col. Stearns, who immediately pushed on with his command in the direction of Bowling Green. It was rumored that Col. Williams and Majors Browne and Jordan, on our side, were killed, but some doubts were entertained as to the fate of the former officer. From Fort Monroe. Fortress Monroe, July 8, P. M.--A. flag of truce was sent up York river yesterday, and returned this afternoon. At Cumberland they found 105 of our wounded soldiers held as prisoners by the rebels. The latter readily c
there was no quorum, and the Senate adjourned. A Federal Disaster. The New York Herald, of the 11th, says: Dispatches from Nashville, dated the 9th inst., report that four companies of the 9th Pennsylvania cavalry were surprised and cut up at daybreak on that morning at Tompkinsville, by a party of one thousand five hundred rebel cavalry, under Col. Stearns, who immediately pushed on with his command in the direction of Bowling Green. It was rumored that Col. Williams and Majors Browne and Jordan, on our side, were killed, but some doubts were entertained as to the fate of the former officer. From Fort Monroe. Fortress Monroe, July 8, P. M.--A. flag of truce was sent up York river yesterday, and returned this afternoon. At Cumberland they found 105 of our wounded soldiers held as prisoners by the rebels. The latter readily consented to give them up. Arrangements were at once made to convey them to the landing; where the steamer Jno. Tucker lay. When the
R. S. Williams (search for this): article 9
y the Government, there was no quorum, and the Senate adjourned. A Federal Disaster. The New York Herald, of the 11th, says: Dispatches from Nashville, dated the 9th inst., report that four companies of the 9th Pennsylvania cavalry were surprised and cut up at daybreak on that morning at Tompkinsville, by a party of one thousand five hundred rebel cavalry, under Col. Stearns, who immediately pushed on with his command in the direction of Bowling Green. It was rumored that Col. Williams and Majors Browne and Jordan, on our side, were killed, but some doubts were entertained as to the fate of the former officer. From Fort Monroe. Fortress Monroe, July 8, P. M.--A. flag of truce was sent up York river yesterday, and returned this afternoon. At Cumberland they found 105 of our wounded soldiers held as prisoners by the rebels. The latter readily consented to give them up. Arrangements were at once made to convey them to the landing; where the steamer Jno. Tu
August, 7 AD (search for this): article 9
inst., report that four companies of the 9th Pennsylvania cavalry were surprised and cut up at daybreak on that morning at Tompkinsville, by a party of one thousand five hundred rebel cavalry, under Col. Stearns, who immediately pushed on with his command in the direction of Bowling Green. It was rumored that Col. Williams and Majors Browne and Jordan, on our side, were killed, but some doubts were entertained as to the fate of the former officer. From Fort Monroe. Fortress Monroe, July 8, P. M.--A. flag of truce was sent up York river yesterday, and returned this afternoon. At Cumberland they found 105 of our wounded soldiers held as prisoners by the rebels. The latter readily consented to give them up. Arrangements were at once made to convey them to the landing; where the steamer Jno. Tucker lay. When they had been conveyed about one mile, a rebel cavalry corps came up and compelled them all to return to the hospital, and Dr. Bradley, of the Hygeia Hospital. was t
James T. Wilson (search for this): article 9
and Secretary of War. The facts ought to be stated fairly. Mr. Wilson, of Mass, said the Senator from Kentucky (Mr. Davis) had made some statements which ought not to go to the country. He (Mr. Wilson) said, without hesitation or qualification, that the Senator from Kentucky (Mr. Davis) was utterly mistaken. He (Mr. Wilson) did not believe that the Secretary of War was engaged in any intrigue against General McClellan. His (Mr. Wilson's) position, as Chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs, gave him (Mr. Wilson) advantages in finding out it such Mr. Wilson) advantages in finding out it such was the case, and this was the first time that he (Mr. Wilson) had ever heard of it. There had been considerable difference in regard to the pMr. Wilson) had ever heard of it. There had been considerable difference in regard to the plans for taking Richmond. It was understood there were three plans. One was that of General Rosecranz, to go by the valley of the Shenandoah to Richmond, and he (Mr. Wilson) believed that the Secretary of War approved of this plan. Another plan was to go down to Richmond by way of
E. K. Parlin (search for this): article 9
when they were informed that they must return to the hospital again, and be left there as prisoners, their grief was indescribable, especially among those who were sick. The scene was heart-rending. The steamer Canonious was fired into yesterday by the rebels, a few miles this side of Harrison's Landing. No damage done. Notwithstanding our gunboats are stationed at intervals of three miles along that portion of the river, yet the rebels, with about six field pieces, dodge down near the river and fire into our transports every day. They fire and run away before the gunboats can bring their guns to bear on them. Fortress Monroe, July 9, 1862. --All is quiet in the army. Nothing is going on except throwing up breastworks and clearing away trees. Among the prisoners at the hospital on the York river, held by the rebels, is Mrs. E. K. Parlin. Dr. Bradly interceded with the rebels for the release of this lady, but to no avail, they turning a deaf ear to his entreaties.
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 9
c. General McClellan was placed in command more than a year ago of all the army, with full power. If the Senator from Missouri (Mr. Henderson) had been told that Gen. McClellan was to take command of the army, and remain in one position, not only all the fall, but all the winter, without making any attack on the enemy, would that Senator have chosen such a General? Mr. Henderson said that he had thought that Manassas should have been attacked; but he also thought that the Senator from Illinois, (Mr. Trumbull,) like many others, had underrated the force of the rebels everywhere. He (Mr. Henderson) was no military man, but he know that the Generals of our army had usually found the enemy stronger than they expected. Mr. Trumbull thought that we overrated the rebels instead of underrating them. We had always acted on the defensive. We were putting down a rebellion; but has the General (McClellan) in whom the Senator has such unbounded confidence ever made an attack? Is this
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 9
Wright, of Ind, thought it too bad, in the time of the "country's trouble. " to make charged against the Generals in the field. He would stand by the man who was fighting the battles of his country. Mr. Chandler said that the Senator from Indiana (Mr. Wright) must have mistaken his (Mr. Chandler's) remarks. The press of the country has been filled with denunciations of the Secretary of War for what they said was a military crime on his part — not sending reinforcements to Gen. McClellancharges of disloyalty made against General McClellan. Mr. Trumbull said that he was astonished that Senators were so united in praising Gen. McClellan, and yet were so unwilling to hear any different opinion concerning him. The Senator from Indiana, (Mr. Wright,) with strange forgetfulness, says that General McClellan has not defended himself in the newspapers. Has that Senator (Mr. Wright) read the papers? The papers have been full of the praises, of General McClellan, and of his "great
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