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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition.. Search the whole document.

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he had weakened the respect of the Colonies for a royal Govern ment, was weary of him; his colleagues disliked him, and conspired to drive him into retirement. Franklin to his Son, 17 August, 1772. The occasion was at hand. Franklin had negotiated with the Treasury for a grant to a Company of about twenty-three millions of acres of land, south of the Ohio and west of the Alleghanies; Hillsborough, from the fear that men in the backwoods would be too independent, opposed the project. De Guines, French Ambassador, to Aiguillon, 11 August, 1772. Franklin persuaded Hertford, a friend of the King's, Gower the President of the Council, Camden, the Secretaries of the Treasury, W. Duer to Robert R. Livingston Jr., London, 3 August, 1772. and others to become shareholders in his scheme; by their influence, the Lords of Council disregarded the adverse report of the Board of Trade, and decided in favor of planting the new Province. Order in Council, 14 Aug. 1772. Compare Propositio
Henry Knox (search for this): chapter 24
scheme; by their influence, the Lords of Council disregarded the adverse report of the Board of Trade, and decided in favor of planting the new Province. Order in Council, 14 Aug. 1772. Compare Propositions for the Settlement of Pittsylvania, and the Memorial of Franklin and Wharton to the American Congress. Hillsborough was too proud to brook this public insult; and the King, soothing his fall by a patent for a British Earldom, accepted his resignation. But his system remained behind him. When he was gone, Thurlow Knox: Extra Official State Papers, II. 45. took care that the grant for the Western Province should never be sealed; and the amiable Dartmouth, Chap. XLVII.} 1772. Aug. who became Secretary for the Colonies, had been taught to believe, Compare Dartmouth to Hutchinson, 2 September, 1772. I have been always taught to believe, &c. &c. like Lord North and the King, that it was necessary to carry out the policy of consolidation, as set forth in Townshend's Preamble.
August 7th (search for this): chapter 24
lonies, Hutchinson sent word to Hillsborough, that if the nation would arouse and unite in measures to retain the Colonies in subordination, all this new doctrine of independence would be disavowed, and its first inventors be sacrificed to the rage of the people whom they had deluded. Hutchinson to Secretary John Pownall, 21 July, 1772; in Remembrancer, 1776, II. 57. The Secretary, on his Aug. part, was proceeding with eager haste to carry Townshend's system into effect; and on the seventh of August, he announced, that the King, with the entire concurrence of Lord North, Compare Hillsborough to Hutchinson, 6 June, 1772. had made provision for the support of his law servants in the Province of Massachusetts Bay. Hillsborough to Lords of Trade, 27 July, 1772, and to Hutchinson, 7 August, 1772. It was almost a special provision for Hutchinson's family. It marks the character of the people, that this act, constituting judges, who held their offices at the King's pleasure, stip
October 25th, 1771 AD (search for this): chapter 24
ted Hillsborough, on the return of confidence and harmony. Robert Eden to Hillsborough, 4 August, 1771. The people, thus Johnson, the Agent of Connecticut wrote after his return home, appear to be weary of their altercations with the Mother Country; a little discreet conduct on both sides, would perfectly reestablish that warm affection and respect towards Great Britain, for which this country was once so Chap. XLVII.} 1771. Sept. Remarkable. W. S. Johnson to Alexander Wedderburn, 25 Oct. 1771. Hutchinson, too, reported a disposition in all the Colonies to let the controversy with the kingdom subside. Hutchinson to Gov Pownall, 14 October, 1771. The King sent word to tempt Hancock by marks of favor. Hancock and most of the party, said the Governor, are quiet; and all of them, except Adams, abate of their virulence. Adams would push the Continent into a rebellion to-morrow, if it was in his power. Hutchinson to John Pownall, Secretary to the Board of Trade, 17 Octobe
July 10th, 1771 AD (search for this): chapter 24
er to be laid before him. Thus the Province was led to speculate on the personal opinions of their Sovereign, and to inquire into the use of regal power itself; while the King regarded the contest with Massachusetts as involving not only the power of Great Britain and the rights of the Crown, but his personal honor. Wise men saw the event that was approaching, but not that it was so near. Out of the eater cometh forth meat, said Cooper the clergyman; Samuel Cooper to B. Franklin, 10 July, 1771. and Franklin foretold a bloody struggle, in which America's Chap. XLVII.} 1771. July. growing strength and magnitude, B. Franklin to Committee of Correspondence in Massachusetts, 15 May, 1771. would give her the victory. The progress of opinion was marked by the instructions of the House to its Agent, which unreservedly embodied the principle that colonial legislation was free of Parliament and of royal instructions. They were drawn by Samuel Adams, who had long before said in To
March 4th, 830 AD (search for this): chapter 24
es con-cluded. June. 1771—August, 1772. the King steadily pursued the system of concen- Chap. XLVII.} 1771. June. trating all power over the Colonies; but so gradually that a sudden, complete collision with ancient usage was avoided. If the Charter of the Province had been taken away, Compare Massachusetts Gazette, 21 Jan. 1771. even the moderate would have held themselves absolved from their allegiance. Compare Brutus in Boston Gazette of 11 Feb. 1771; 827, 1, 1, and of Monday, 4 March, 830, 1, 2; and letters of Eliot and Cooper. But the appointment of a native Bostonian as Governor, seemed to many a pledge of relenting; and his plausible professions hushed the people into silence. The glorious spirit of liberty is vanquished and left without hope but in a miracle, said desponding patriots. I confess, said Samuel Adams, we have, as Wolfe expressed it, a choice of difficulties. Too many flatter themselves that their pusillanimity is true prudence; but in perilous times
December 10th, 1770 AD (search for this): chapter 24
sed laws, restraining the importations of negroes from Africa; but their laws were disallowed. How to prevent them from protecting themselves against the increase of the overwhelming evil was debated by the King in Council, and on the tenth day of December, 1770, he issued an instruction, under his own hand, commanding the Governor, upon pain of the highest displeasure, to assent to no law, by which the importation of slaves should be in any respect prohibited or obstructed. Order in Council of 9 December, 1770. George R. Additional instructions to our Lieutenant and Governor General, of our Colony and Dominion of Virginia in America, 10 December, 1770. In April 1772, this rigorous order was solemnly debated in the Assembly of Virginia. They were very anxious for an Act to restrain the introduction of people, the number of whom already in the Colony, gave them just cause to apprehend the most dangerous consequences, and therefore made it necessary that they should fall upon means
December 9th, 1770 AD (search for this): chapter 24
straining the importations of negroes from Africa; but their laws were disallowed. How to prevent them from protecting themselves against the increase of the overwhelming evil was debated by the King in Council, and on the tenth day of December, 1770, he issued an instruction, under his own hand, commanding the Governor, upon pain of the highest displeasure, to assent to no law, by which the importation of slaves should be in any respect prohibited or obstructed. Order in Council of 9 December, 1770. George R. Additional instructions to our Lieutenant and Governor General, of our Colony and Dominion of Virginia in America, 10 December, 1770. In April 1772, this rigorous order was solemnly debated in the Assembly of Virginia. They were very anxious for an Act to restrain the introduction of people, the number of whom already in the Colony, gave them just cause to apprehend the most dangerous consequences, and therefore made it necessary that they should fall upon means not only of p
October 14th, 1771 AD (search for this): chapter 24
so Chap. XLVII.} 1771. Sept. Remarkable. W. S. Johnson to Alexander Wedderburn, 25 Oct. 1771. Hutchinson, too, reported a disposition in all the Colonies to let the controversy with the kingdom subside. Hutchinson to Gov Pownall, 14 October, 1771. The King sent word to tempt Hancock by marks of favor. Hancock and most of the party, said the Governor, are quiet; and all of them, except Adams, abate of their virulence. Adams would push the Continent into a rebellion to-morrow, if it t. and rebellious race? The liberties of our country are worth defending at all hazards. If we should suffer them to be wrested from us, millions yet unborn may be the miserable sharers in the event. Samuel Adams in the Boston Gazette, of 14 Oct. 1771. Every step has been taken but one; and the last appeal would require prudence, unanimity, and fortitude. America must herself, under God, finally work out her own salvation. Samuel Adams to Arthur Lee, Boston, 31 Oct. 1771. Life of Arthu
July 5th, 1771 AD (search for this): chapter 24
To withhold your assent to this bill, merely by force of instruction, is effectually vacating the Charter and giving instructions the force of laws, within this Province. If such a doctrine shall be established, the representatives of a free people would be reduced to this fatal alternative,—either to have no taxes levied and raised at all, or to have them raised and levied in such a way and manner, and upon those only whom his Majesty pleases. Message from the House to the Governor, 5 July, 1771. At the first meeting of the Assembly, loyalty had visibly prevailed, and the decided patriots were in a minority; necessity had extorted the most explicit assertion of colonial rights, and an unanswerable exposition of the limit of the prerogative. In closing the session Hutchinson put at issue the respect for monarchy itself. I know, said he, that your messages and resolves of the last year were very displeasing to the King; Bradford's State Papers, 311. I shall transmit my message
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