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Alfred Rhett (search for this): chapter 8
Colonel Gilmer, C. S. Corps of Engineers; Colonel Rhett, 1st S. C. Artillery; Colonel Harris, C. S Endorses Lieutenant Johnson's opinion. Colonel Rhett: In action would be impracticable to use b condition of fort, if time is allowed. Colonel Rhett: Would like to see it carried out, but conot undertake to answer as regards time. Colonel Rhett: The eastern wall is much shattered by fvidence of the estimation in which he held Colonel Rhett, General Beauregard, shortly after this ocan 8-inch, and one 32-pounder rifled gun. Lieutenant Rhett, with Company B, has dismounted the Brookre than ordinary pains in the selection of Colonel Rhett's successor. He was solicitous that nonewell, of Bishop Stephen Elliott, and of Colonel Alfred Rhett. He was a young officer of well-earnedommanding officers on that island; also on Colonel Rhett and Major Elliott for the same in referencliaferro, Hagood, Colquitt, and Ripley, of Colonels Rhett, Butler, Harris, Keitt, and Harrison, or o[17 more...]
W. B. Taliaferro (search for this): chapter 8
ral,--It is the wish of the Commanding General that you call on Generals Hagood, Colquitt, and Taliaferro, and Colonels Keitt and Harrison, to furnish the names of such officers and men who have speci Chief of Staff. A copy of the telegram referred to was, on the same day, forwarded to General Taliaferro, commanding the Seventh Military District. He was directed to hold his troops prepared at was also instructed as to what course to follow, should he be called to the assistance of General Taliaferro. The incident now about to be related is deserving of note. It produced a feeling of dot one word of General Beauregard, who stood at his elbow while he spoke; not one word of Generals Taliaferro, Hagood, Colquitt, and Ripley, of Colonels Rhett, Butler, Harris, Keitt, and Harrison, or864, we take the following passage: In November, President Davis visited James Island. General Taliaferro was absent on leave, and General Hagood in command. Mr. Davis inspected the works closely
Rosecrans (search for this): chapter 8
t the Army of Virginia is about to take the offensive again, to prevent Meade from reinforcing Rosecrans, thus repeating, to a certain extent, the campaign of last July into Pennsylvania, which did It is evident to my mind that, admitting Lee's movement can prevent Meade from reinforcing Rosecrans and drive the former across the Potomac, Lee cannot prevent Rosecrans from being reinforced byRosecrans from being reinforced by about 40,000 or 50,000 men from Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Missouri, and the Mississippi Valley, in about one month's time; hence, admitting that Rosecrans has now about your own supposed effective foRosecrans has now about your own supposed effective force—say 60,000 men of all arms—he will then have about 110,000 men against 60,000. War being a contest of masses against fractions, all other things being equal, you would certainly be defeated; tston's forces, to enable you to take the offensive forthwith, and cross the Tennessee to crush Rosecrans before he can be reinforced to any large extent from any quarter. Then you could attack and d
R. S. Ripley (search for this): chapter 8
eport of September 4th, forwarded, through General Ripley, to Department Headquarters, show the workowing instructions to be forwarded to Brigadier-General Ripley: General,— In reply to your lCharleston, S. C., Sept. 10th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.Charleston, S. C., Sept. 14th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.Charleston, S. C., Sept. 15th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 23d, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: Charleston, S. C., Sept. 29th, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.:, Charleston, S. C., Oct. 8th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc., Charleston, S. C., Oct. 30th, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.:., Charleston, S. C., Nov. 4th, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.:[11 more...]
William J. Hardee (search for this): chapter 8
ble defence? Who executed it? What troops were there, and under what officers did they fight? These are questions as to which complete silence is preserved; and from what follows the reader is led to believe that the Commanding General was General Hardee, and that Fort Sumter was never under any officer except Colonel Stephen D. Elliott. We quote: When the city was about to be abandoned to the army of General Sherman the forts defending the harbor were embraced in General Hardee's plan oGeneral Hardee's plan of evacuation. The gallant commander of Fort Sumter, Colonel Stephen Elliott, Jr., with unyielding fortitude refused to be relieved, after being under incessant bombardment, day and night, for weeks. It was supposed he must be exhausted, and he was invited to withdraw for rest; but, on receiving the general order of retreat, he assembled his brave force on the rugged and shellcrushed parade-ground, read his instructions, and, in a voice that trembled with emotion, addressed his men in the glowi
places, and had partially covered up the explosive shells, spiked planks, and pikes placed in the ditch for its defence. See also General Gillmore's book, p. 74, § 168, where the same incorrect statements are made. 4th. The bomb-proof of Wagner could not contain 1800 men, or more than 600; the garrison of the work being about 800 men. 5th. Nineteen pieces of artillery and a large supply of excellent ammunition were captured. The pieces of heavy and light artillery left in Wagner ande of the guns at Battery Simkins, so as to allow it to be brought to bear upon and against Fort Sumter if necessary. The right-hand gun of this battery cannot be thus altered without exposing it too much to the fire of the enemy from Gregg and Wagner. I have the honor to be, General, very respectfully, your obdt. servt., Clifton H. Smith, A. A. G. P. S.—The Commanding General further directs that you instruct the Engineer to close the embrasure at Battery Simkins every morning befo
o sweep its exterior faces, at a concerted signal from Major Elliott, or whensoever the approach of hostile boats shall be evident. Concert of action, however, is most desirable. This order was also sent to Brigadier-General Hagood. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Nov. 1st, 1863. His Excellency M. L. Bonham, Governor of South Carolina, etc., etc.: Governor,—Your letter of the 24th inst. enclosing one from Colonel Waddy Thompson, and another from Messrs. Pullian and Patten, has been received. I have ordered a light battery to report at once to Colonel Williams, at Greenville, S. C. I regret as much as you do my inability to send mounted troops for the defence of that part of the State. It is not prudent to withdraw, at this critical moment, from my already too small forces a regiment of old troops from the defence of Charleston. So soon as it can be done with safety I
l. D. B. Harris, Chief-Engineer, etc., etc.: Colonel,—I am instructed to say in this way what has already been communicated to you verbally by the Commanding General—that he approves of every measure practicable to give Fort Sumter means for contributing to the general defence of the entrance of the harbor; and, therefore, he desires certain casemates in northeast face, which Major-General Gilmer Promoted, about the 15th of September, 1863. has designated in his communication of the 23d instant, to be put in condition to receive two 10-inch columbiads, one 42-pounder, and one 32-pounder, rifled and banded; these pieces to be thoroughly protected from a rear and vertical fire of the enemy's batteries. Respectfully, your obdt. servt., Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 29th, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—The Commanding General instructs me to inquire whethe<
some definite signal, upon the giving of which by him the batteries on Sullivan's and James islands, and the ironclads of our navy bearing on the several faces of that work, shall open fire so as to sweep every point of approach. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Oct. 30th, 1863. Brig.-Genl. Johnson Hagood, Comdg., etc., James Island, S. C.: General,—In reply to your letter of the 29th instant I am directed by the Commanding General to inform you that the Engineer Department has been ordered to alter the embrasure of one of the guns at Battery Simkins, so as to allow it to be brought to bear upon and against Fort Sumter if necessary. The right-hand gun of this battery cannot be thus altered without exposing it too much to the fire of the enemy from Gregg and Wagner. I have the honor to be, General, very respectfully, your obdt. servt., Clifton H. Smith, A. A. G. P
November 2nd (search for this): chapter 8
Richmond he stopped a day or two in Savannah and Charleston, and made it a point to inspect some of their defensive works and the gallant troops manning them. Unable to go in person to welcome the President upon his arrival in the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, General Beauregard sent several members of his staff—among whom were Colonel Roman and Lieutenant Chisolm—to perform that duty and accompany the distinguished visitor to Charleston. He reached there on the 2d of November, at about 1 P. M., and found General Beauregard awaiting him at the depot, or what served as such, with an imposing military escort. There was also a deputation of citizens, appointed by the civil authorities, to offer him the hospitalities of the city. But he declined their invitation, having already promised a personal friend—ex-Governor Aiken— to repair to his residence and make of it his headquarters during his short sojourn in Charleston. The President was escorted with all du
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