hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Europe 998 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 994 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 766 0 Browse Search
France (France) 692 0 Browse Search
China (China) 602 0 Browse Search
London (United Kingdom) 494 0 Browse Search
Early English 488 0 Browse Search
Department de Ville de Paris (France) 458 0 Browse Search
James Watt 343 1 Browse Search
Herodotus 256 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight). Search the whole document.

Found 891 total hits in 375 results.

... 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 ...
TropicsFragrant oil. Used in perfumery. FennelFoeniculum vulgareBritain, etcUsed in medicine. GrassAndropogon (various)IndiaObtained from various Indian grasses. Used in perfumery and medicine. JasmineJasminaceaeAsia, EuropeA perfume. Obtained from the flowers by placing them in tallow and extracting by means of alcohol the volatile principle. LavenderLavendula vera et spicaEuropeOil used largely in perfumery and medicine. Lemon-grassAndropogon citratumIndiaA delicious essential oil. LemonCitrus limonumWarm climatesThe rind affords an oil used in perfumery, flavoring, etc. NeroliCitrus (various)EuropePerfumed oil obtained from various species of the orange family. Affords the orange-flower water of the shops, etc. NutmegMyristica moschataMoluccas, etcEssential oil. Used in perfumery. Otto or attar of roseRosa moschataTurkey and SyriaA fragrant oil obtained from the Eastern species of rose. Centifolia, Damascena Orange(See Bergamot, Neroli.) PatchouliPogostemon patchouli
rostatic press, securing all the oil at a single or once-repeated pressure. Castor-oil is valued more highly, and is cold drawn, or should be. A list of the more important expressed oils is given, with some particulars as to each. Variety.Quality.Specific Gravity.Oil per cent. Ure et al. FlaxDrying0.934711 – 22 PoppyD0.924356 – 63 HempD0.927620 SesamumGreasy50 OliveG0.9176 AlmondG0.918050 CucumberD0.923125 BeechG0.922516 MustardG0.916030 SunflowerD0.926215 RapeG0.913633 CastorD0.961162 TobaccoD0.9232 Plum-kernelG0.912733 Grape-seedD0.920220 Cocoa-nutG PalmG0.968 CamelinaD0.925228 Cotton-seedD12 ColzaG0.913640 Radish-seedG0.918750 Apple-seedG Horse-chestnutG0.92710 Pine-topD0.9285 WalnutD0.926060 Common Name.Botanical Name.Native Place, or where chiefly grown.Qualities, Uses, etc. FuselTriticum, etcEurope, etcSeeds produce a peculiar oil. It gives the flavor to raw whiskey and is used for making flavoring extracts. Formerly used for burning. Gin
ing. PinePinus sylvestrisEurope, etcLeaves afford an oil which can be made into soap. PoppyPapaver somniferum, var. nigrumIndia, etcOil used extensively in the arts and for adulterating more expensive oils. RapeBrassica oleracea, etcEurope, etcExtensively used for burning in lamps. Colza is similar to it. When refined is equal to sperm-oil. SesamumSesamum indicumIndia, etcSeeds afford an oil used in India for cooking, burning, anointing, etc. Elsewhere used in lamps and for making soap. Shea butter or oilBassia parkiiW. AfricaSeeds afford an oil used in Europe for candle and soap making, etc. Souari-nutCaryocar nuciferum, etc.South AmericaContains a sweet oil. Much used in South America. SunflowerHelianthus annuusEurope, etcSeed yields an oil. Used in making fancy soaps, etc. Tallow (vegetable).Pentadesma butyraSierra LeoneTallow, a term often applied to solid fatty substances obtained from plants. That produced from the seeds of the Stillingia sebifera is used for candles b
Isaac Newton (search for this): chapter 15
et to be triple, as his telescope was not of sufficient power to define the ring. He afterward saw the phases of Venus and the spots on the sun. The reflecting telescope was invented in several forms, known as the Gregorian, Newtonian, etc. Then Newton made his discoveries in the reflection, refraction, inflections, and colors of light. Achromatism was discovered by Dolland; afterward polarization of light by double refraction; a century later polarization by reflection, by single refraction; ; then came the discovery that the colors of soap-bubbles were due to the thickness of the film, and this led to ascertaining the length of waves of light. The undulatory theory was suggested in 1664, and was held in abeyance by the supremacy of Newton's preferred material theory; the eye came to be considered as a camera, as described by Da Vinci; later we have reached the kaleidoscope the stereoscope, the photographic camera and processes, the compound and achromatic microscope, which is now
etc. The reamer is introduced into the bore to true it; the drill fails to make a smooth hole, and the reamer is about circular in its form, giving a perfect shape, and fitting the bore to receive the tube. Oil-well packing. Ointment-syringe. Oldham's coupling. The pipe-tongs is adapted to grasp the drill-rod or tube while a new hitch is being taken in withdrawing or introducing either. The presence of oil in springs has been noticed from time immemorial, and the rock-oil, Seneca oil, or whatever custom or charlatans have called it, has been famous either as having a sacred character or association, as in the famous wells of the Caspian, or as a liniment. Bitumen, asphate, bituminous shales and rocks, are found in many parts of the world, and the references to the subject are found scattered in the writings of Herodotus, Pliny, and very many others of the writers of antiquity. It is said that on digging near the river Ochus [in Bactria] a spring of oil was discov
Catharine Medici (search for this): chapter 15
0 feet = nearly 11 1/2 miles. The odometer is employed in mapping districts of country, filling details of roads and lanes in triangulations. One form used by the United States Coast Survey is a wheel 2 feet 7 1/2 inches in diameter, 8 feet 3 inches in circumference, traversing one rod in 2 revolutions. The index in the box points to miles and rods traversed. Odometers are sometimes used in hacks and carriages for casual hire, to determine the distance. Fernel, physician to Catharine de Medici, Queen of France, measured with an instrument of this kind, in 1550, a degree of the meridian between Paris and Amiens, and found it to be 303 toises less than Picard afterward found it to be. It is supposed that the revolutions of the wheel were noted by striking on a bell. The measurement of a degree of latitude has been made and recorded not less than fourteen times in the last 1,000 years. Its length varies in different countries, as the facts show and theory had supposed. E
Cyrus W. Field (search for this): chapter 15
n-rod connects directly to the crank. It was invented by James Watt, and was brought into use by Maudslay. Watt's model, made at Soho in 1763, was exhibited at the London Exhibition of 1851. Witty of Hull patented the oscillating cylinder in England in 1813. English patent, June 5. Goldsworth Gurney was in some way associated with the improvement of it, and has been credited with the invention. It was introduced by those two famous makers of marine and river engines, Maudslay and Field and Penn and Sons. This engine has a cylinder mounted on gudgeons or trunnions, generally near the middle of its length, on which it is capable of swaying to and fro through a small arc, so as to enable the piston-rod to follow the movements of the crank, to which it is directly attached without the intervention of a connectingrod. This construction is economical of space and weight. The trunnions are hollow, and are connected by steam-tight joints, one with a steam-pipe leading from
amois-leather (which see). Oiled Pa′per. Transparent paper used for tracing. See tracing-paper. Oiled silk. (Fabric.) Silk which has been treated with a boiled oil, so as to render it water and perspiration proof. Used as sweat-pads, as a lining in hats and bonnets to resist the perspiration, and over wet dressings of wounds to prevent evaporation. Oil′er. A can for applying oil to a journal. From the numerous forms the following may be selected: — Oilers. a is Olmstead's oiler, made of thin sheet-metal, the bottom of the bulb being weighted so that it always stands upright. b is Broughton's oiler, having an outer shell, an internal reservoir of elastic material, and an opening in the bottom for a thumb-piece, by which the reservoir is compressed to discharge oil. c has a swiveled tube attached by an elbow to the discharge-tube, and which reaches the oil collected at the lower portion of the can when tilted. d has a transparent chamber between th
Henry Maudslay (search for this): chapter 15
apparatus. Os′cil-lat-ing—cyl′in-der Steam—en′gine. (Steam.) A simple form of engine, in which the cylinder rocks on trunnions and the piston-rod connects directly to the crank. It was invented by James Watt, and was brought into use by Maudslay. Watt's model, made at Soho in 1763, was exhibited at the London Exhibition of 1851. Witty of Hull patented the oscillating cylinder in England in 1813. English patent, June 5. Goldsworth Gurney was in some way associated with the improvement of it, and has been credited with the invention. It was introduced by those two famous makers of marine and river engines, Maudslay and Field and Penn and Sons. This engine has a cylinder mounted on gudgeons or trunnions, generally near the middle of its length, on which it is capable of swaying to and fro through a small arc, so as to enable the piston-rod to follow the movements of the crank, to which it is directly attached without the intervention of a connectingrod. This c
O. Oak′um. (Anglo-Saxon, acumba.) 1. The coarse portion separated from strick (strike: A.-S., strican) of flax or hemp in hackling. 2. Untwisted rope; used for calking the seams of a ship's plank, being forced thereinto by chisel and mallet. A first-rate ship of war requires 67,000 pounds of oakum to close the seams. Oar. 1. (Nautical.) An instrument for rowing. A long paddle which rests in tholes on the gunwale in rowing. A long oar, used occasionally to assist a vessel in a calm, is a sweep, and is operated by two or more men. Small oars are sculls; one rower wielding a pair, sitting midlength of the thwart. Scalling a boat is performed by an oar shipped in a half-round hole at the stern, the oar being moved with a twisting action from side to side. A rigged oar is one in which the oar is pivoted to the gunwale and moved by a rod, or otherwise by a rower sitting abaft it, so that he may face forward. The blade of the oar, also known as the wash,
... 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 ...