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d at Harper's Ferry on the thirtieth of May; but the men refused to be sworn into the service of the United States unless they could dictate terms, which were, that they should go to Washington and be placed in a camp of instruction. These being rejected by officers of the United States army, the whole regiment marched over to Sandy Hook, where the troops slept upon it, with the result that eight companies took the oath, one asked for further time, and one started for home. On the twenty-eighth of May, General Banks thought it his duty to assign a full brigadier-general to the command of my brigade, and make the War Department responsible for the change. For this he selected General Greene, General order no. 26.Headquarters Department of the Shenandoah, Williamsport, Md., May 28, 1862. I. Brigadier-General George S. Greene, U. S. A., having reported for duty at these headquarters in accordance with the orders of the War Department, is assigned to the command of the Third
June 2nd, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 9
he Boston daily Advertiser, of which C. F. Dunbar was then editor, on the 26th of May, 1862. As soon as it came to his notice, Banks, in a telegram to Dunbar, offered up Copeland as a propitiatory sacrifice, as follows :-- Williamsburg, Md., June 2, 1862. To Mr. C. F. Dunbar, Boston, Mass. Major Copeland should secure some position in the Massachusetts regiments of equal rank to that he now holds. It is not consistent that he should return to his post here after his proclamation in Boston.p. 32. why Copeland's hands, during the remainder of the war, held nothing more belligerent than the pen, the ruler, and the hammer. See a letter vindicating Secretary Stanton, written by Horatio Woodman, Esq., in Boston daily Transcript of June 2, 1862, supposed to have been inspired by Governor Andrew. In other States the excitement was scarcely less intense than in Massachusetts. New York sent her Eleventh Regiment of State Militia. It arrived at Harper's Ferry on the thirtieth of Ma
th of June the Secretary of War specifically assigned to me the command of my old brigade; Special orders, no. 138.War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, June 18, 1862. 9th. Brigadier-General George H. Gordon, U. S. Vols., is assigned to duty in the Department of the Shenandoah, to take command of the brigade now under Brigadier-General Greene, and will report in person to Major-General Banks. By order of the Secretary of War. L. Thomas, Adjt.-General. and on the 22d, after a fruitless effort on the preceding day by rail, via Manassas, to reach Front Royal, to which place my command had moved from Bartonsville, I shook the dust of Washington from my feet, not to return to it again for two months, when, as part of a wrecked and broken army, we made our way across the Potomac to fight under McClellan at Antietam, for the safety of Maryland and the North. Before leaving Washington, I enlightened the Committee on the Conduct of the War upon the subject of Un
ve hundred wagons, of which number fifty-five were lost. They were not, with few exceptions, abandoned to the enemy, but were burned I never heard of any wagons burned upon the road but the nine I destroyed near Newtown. I never heard of our recapture of the six miles of wagons, taken by the enemy between Strasburg and Middletown. upon the road. Nearly all of our supplies were thus saved. But the stores at Front Royal, of which he had no knowledge until his visit to that post on the 21st inst., and those at Winchester, of which a considerable portion was destroyed by our troops, are not embraced in this statement. Quint Chaplain Second Massachusetts, in Record of Second Massachusetts infantry. says, A wagon-train eight miles long lost only fifty wagons, and we brought off all our artillery, losing only one caisson. The enemy's account of his captures is put with force: The complete success of our efforts can never be known. We have captured thousands of prisoners, kill
May 31st, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 9
's command on Virginia soil a feeble rear-guard of four companies from the Second Massachusetts and Third Wisconsin of my brigade. The purposes and plans that animated General Banks during this retreat were revealed to the world on the 31st day of May, 1862 (six days after the events here narrated had occurred), in his official report. In this paper I not only learned for the first time what his plans were (if he had any) at our conference in Winchester, but I further found out that before d accompanied us from Strasburg. In his order General Banks took especial care to speak in praise of the part taken by my brigade during the retreat. On the thirty-first of May a paper was handed me by General Hatch, Williamsport, Md., May 31, 1862. To the Hon. Edwin Stanton, Secretary of War. The undersigned officers of the army, serving in the Department of the Shenandoah, take great pleasure in recommending for the appointment of brigadier-general, Colonel George H. Gordon, command
May 29th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 9
e indignation is felt here, that exaggerated and unauthorized and unfounded statements of losses of public property sustained by our retreat from Strasburg and Winchester have found publicity through papers at a distance. At present the figures cannot be accurately ascertained; but the heaviest losses are known to be very light compared with the amounts exposed to capture or abandonment by such a rapid retreat as it was necessary to perform. General Joseph E. Johnston, in his order of May 29, 1862, announcing another brilliant victory by the combined divisions of Major-Generals Jackson and Ewell, constituting a portion of this army, over General Banks at Front Royal, Middletown, and Winchester, declares that several thousands of prisoners In Johnston's Narrative he puts the prisoners at 2,000, probably nearly correct. See Narrative of military operations, by Joseph E. Johnston, General C. S. A., 1874, p. 129. were captured, and an immense quantity of ammunition and stores of e
May 28th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 9
hole regiment marched over to Sandy Hook, where the troops slept upon it, with the result that eight companies took the oath, one asked for further time, and one started for home. On the twenty-eighth of May, General Banks thought it his duty to assign a full brigadier-general to the command of my brigade, and make the War Department responsible for the change. For this he selected General Greene, General order no. 26.Headquarters Department of the Shenandoah, Williamsport, Md., May 28, 1862. I. Brigadier-General George S. Greene, U. S. A., having reported for duty at these headquarters in accordance with the orders of the War Department, is assigned to the command of the Third Brigade, General A. S. Williams's division, and will relieve Colonel George H. Gordon, Second Massachusetts Volunteers, who on being relieved will assume command of his regiment. 11. InI announcing this cllange in the organization of the Third Brigade, under the general direction of tie Dea)tlmle
June 14th, 1875 AD (search for this): chapter 9
ffered, man had added his touch to stamp forever the scene upon my mind. There, just below us, in good rifle-range, preceded by swarms of skirmishers, regiment after regiment of the enemy were moving in good order steadily but rapidly up the hill. This was Taylor's brigade, numbering four thousand men (about five hundred more than the whole of Banks's army), as appears from the following letter to me from General George L. Andrews, my former Lieutenant-Colonel:-- West Point, N. Y., June 14, 1875. Dear General, After the surrender at Meridian, on the borders of Alabama and Mississippi, where I went to receive the parole of General Taylor's army, I had a conversation with the latter about the Winchester fight. In the course of it, I said that if we could have opposed his whole brigade with a battery, and reserved the infantry fire longer, I thought we might have checked him. He replied in substance that no doubt we should have hurt them a good deal, but he thought we could
May 26th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 9
tion, calling upon Massachusetts to rise once more for the rescue and defence of the capital. The whole active militia of Massachusetts was summoned to report on Boston Common to-morrow, from thence to oppose with fiery zeal and courageous patriotism the march of the foe. This was dated the twenty-fifth of May, Sunday, 11 P. M. The next day the public was again excited by an appeal This appeal came out in the Boston daily Advertiser, of which C. F. Dunbar was then editor, on the 26th of May, 1862. As soon as it came to his notice, Banks, in a telegram to Dunbar, offered up Copeland as a propitiatory sacrifice, as follows :-- Williamsburg, Md., June 2, 1862. To Mr. C. F. Dunbar, Boston, Mass. Major Copeland should secure some position in the Massachusetts regiments of equal rank to that he now holds. It is not consistent that he should return to his post here after his proclamation in Boston. Please convey to him this information. N. P. Banks, A. A. C. See Stateme
as almost surrounding Winchester. The entire crest for three parts of this vast circumference was covered with the enemy. Now, for the first time, I saw General Banks, making a feeble effort to arrest the troops, and uttering some words about promised reinforcements. Turning his eyes backward, I think there was no doubt in his own mind that the enemy had developed his force to him, -thus reversing the necessity with which General Banks had met my most urgent appeals on the night of the 23d of May. I must develop the force of the enemy. General Banks had made no provision for a retreat, evidently believing that with his inferior force he should comply with his telegram to the War Department, sent the day before, and return to Strasburg. Such a telegram was in the hands of the Committee on the Conduct of the War, and an explanation asked of a witness who was attempting to show that Banks knew before he left Strasburg the number of Jackson's forces. When Banks in his official rep
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