hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 530 0 Browse Search
P. R. Cleburne 224 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Franklin Cheatham 206 6 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 187 1 Browse Search
Bushrod Johnson 178 8 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 172 4 Browse Search
B. F. Cheatham 170 0 Browse Search
Nathan B. Forrest 135 7 Browse Search
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) 132 4 Browse Search
William B. Bate 130 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

Found 390 total hits in 141 results.

... 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Otho French Strahl (search for this): chapter 3
Mississippi (a son of Tennessee); the wounding of gallant Capt. Marsh T. Polk, who lost a leg; and the final dislodgment of the enemy and the capture of two batteries, one by the One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Senior Tennessee, Col. Preston Smith, the other by the Thirteenth Tennessee, Col. A. J. Vaughan, Jr. Polk also called attention to the brilliant courage of the Fifth Tennessee, Col. C. D. Venable, and the Thirty-third Tennessee, Col. Alex. W. Campbell, and to the gallantry of Lieut.-Col. O. F. Strahl, who, in reply to the inquiry of his intrepid brigade commander, General Stewart, Can you take that battery? said, We will try, and at the order, Forward, moved at a double-quick to within thirty paces of the enemy's guns, halted, delivered one round, and with a yell charged the battery, capturing several prisoners and the guns; but the valorous Fourth lost Maj. John F. Henry and Capt. John Sutherland, with 31 men killed and 150 wounded. The battery captured was composed of heavy g
P. R. Cleburne (search for this): chapter 3
econd to Brigadier-General Chalmers' brigade of Withers' division. In Hardee's corps, Brigadier-General Cleburne's brigade included the Thirty-fifth, Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth regiments, and Brittle of the 6th at dawn of day, stated in his official report that in the first assault made by Cleburne, Colonel Bate, Second Tennessee, fell severely wounded while bravely leading his regiment. Col Twenty-seventh, serving under Cheatham on the 7th, was killed in a charge on the enemy. General Cleburne made honorable mention of Colonel Bate, and said of his regiment: Tennessee can never mourna commander in the field. The Thirtyfifth Tennessee, Col. Benjamin J. Hill, was conspicuous in Cleburne's first and final charge on the enemy. General Cleburne, concluding his report, said: I would General Cleburne, concluding his report, said: I would like to do justice to the many acts of individual valor and intrepid daring during the fight. . . . Col. Ben Hill, Fifth Tennessee; Lieutenant-Colonel Peebles, Twenty-fourth Tennessee; Lieut. R. H. K
Jacob Thompson (search for this): chapter 3
ception of Blythe's Mississippi, the Eleventh Louisiana and the Thirteenth Arkansas, was composed entirely of Tennesseeans. Colonel Lindsay's Mississippi regiment of cavalry reported to General Polk. This splendid regiment had been known up to this date as Miller's battalion, Lieut.-Col. J. H. Miller commanding. On the 3d day of April General Johnston issued an address to the troops, in which he announced, I have put you in motion to offer battle to the invaders of your country. Hon. Jacob Thompson, of Mississippi, aide to General Beauregard, in his report of April 9th states that this advance was made in consequence of the information brought, from General Cheatham, who occupied Bethel Station and the town of Purdy with his division. In the attack about to be made on General Grant, General Johnston expected to beat him back to his transports and there capture him and his forces, then cross the Tennessee river and give battle to Buell, known to be advancing to Grant's assista
eneral Cheatham declared that this conflict was the most hotly contested I ever witnessed. He had met fresh troops under McCook. General Polk made honorable mention of Generals Cheatham, Clark, Stewart and Johnson, and Colonels Russell, Maney, Step enemy, and made a good record with Cheatham (attached to the brigade commanded by Col. Preston Smith) in his battle with McCook's division of Buell's army. There were three battalions of regulars in Rousseau's brigade of this division, and of Buell's loss of 3,753, the heaviest part was sustained by McCook in his combat with Cheatham. The Tennessee artillery—Bankhead's battery, Capt. Smith P. Bankhead; Polk's battery, Capt. M. Y. Polk; Rutledge's battery, Capt. A. M. Rutledge—rendered conspd was mustered into the provisional army of Tennessee. It was with Cheatham on the 6th and in his battle of the 7th with McCook, and was referred to by General Cheatham as having rendered splendid service, Captain Smith and his officers and men bein
W. F. Cowan (search for this): chapter 3
d Captain Polk. Maj. R. P. Caldwell, Twelfth Tennessee, conspicuous for his bearing, reports that after the commissioned officers of companies B and G had all been killed or disabled by wounds, Private A. T. Fielder took charge of them and led these two companies all day in the thickest part of the battle. Lieut.-Col. F. M. Stewart and Capt. W. Dawson, Twenty-second Tennessee, were severely wounded. The Thirteenth lost 137 killed and wounded, among the former, Lieuts. C. H. Whitmore and W. F. Cowan. Col. A. W. Campbell of the Thirty-third, afterward brigadier-general, reported that Maj. Henry C. McNeill displayed throughout a cool bravery rarely equaled. The regiment lost 123 killed and wounded. Col. Preston Smith reported that the officers and men of his brigade conducted themselves well and courageously. The One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Tennessee lost 188 in killed and wounded. The great body of the Tennessee troops never fought better than at Shiloh. Though many of them
George Maney (search for this): chapter 3
nessee, and the command of that gallant regiment upon Lieut.-Col. Marcus J. Wright. At 2:30 p. m. of the same day, Col. George Maney, senior officer of Stephens' brigade, assumed the command of it; and Maj. Hume R. Feild, next in rank present, tooknder McCook. General Polk made honorable mention of Generals Cheatham, Clark, Stewart and Johnson, and Colonels Russell, Maney, Stephens and Preston Smith. Of General Cheatham he said: In the operations of this morning (the 7th), as well as the daough his adjutant, Melville Doak, to General Cheatham, and was now advanced, with the First and Ninth Tennessee under Colonel Maney, to a final attack on the only position held by the enemy in Cheatham's front. The enemy was routed and fled the fiedered good service. Capt. Melancthon Smith's battery, composed of Mississippians, was attached to Stephens', afterward Maney's, brigade. It entered the service with Cheatham and was mustered into the provisional army of Tennessee. It was with C
S. A. M. Wood (search for this): chapter 3
fifth, Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth regiments, and Brig.-Gen. S. A. M. Wood's brigade, the Twenty-seventh, Forty-fourth and Fifty-fifth. T In the attack on the left center of General Hardee's line, Brigadier-General Wood charged a battery on a gentle acclivity and captured six guy sustained a severe loss in the death of this gallant officer. General Wood, referring in his report to that noble man and to the same chargel Neil of the Twenty-third Tennessee, were among the number. General Wood reported that Col. C. A. McDaniel, of the Forty-fourth Tennesseehivalrously. The Fifty-fifth Tennessee, Col. William McKoin, was in Wood's brigade, and held the right of Wood's line in the successful attacWood's line in the successful attack of the early morning on the enemy's camp. Of Lieut.-Col. J. M. Crews, of Crews' battalion, Colonel Trabue reported that he behaved well. Tapt. A. M. Rutledge—rendered conspicuous and valuable services. General Wood, reporting the battle of the 7th, testified that when large mass
Thomas Claiborne (search for this): chapter 3
rwarded from Paducah to the Confederate army. The expedition, consisting of three companies of cavalry, was commanded by Maj. Carl Shaeffer de Boernstein. Col. Thomas Claiborne, Sixth Tennessee cavalry, with his own and the Seventh Tennessee, Col. W. H. Jackson, the whole force 1,250 strong, hearing of the Federal expedition, madefor fourteen miles. The Federal force was dispersed and scattered in all directions. Six were killed, 16 wounded, and 67 captured. In his official report Colonel Claiborne stated that Captain Ballentine was most of all conspicuous for his gallant bearing and use of his saber and pistol. He fired at and mortally wounded Maj. Cathis affair Captain, afterward Colonel, Ballentine exhibited the enterprise, dash and splendid courage for which he was so often subsequently distinguished. Colonel Claiborne, of the Sixth Tennessee, after the campaign of 1862 accepted service on the staff of General Buckner, where he served with distinction. He was an officer of
R. H. Keeble (search for this): chapter 3
alor, and its commander, Lieutenant-Colonel Peebles, showed that he possessed all the qualifications of a commander in the field. The Thirtyfifth Tennessee, Col. Benjamin J. Hill, was conspicuous in Cleburne's first and final charge on the enemy. General Cleburne, concluding his report, said: I would like to do justice to the many acts of individual valor and intrepid daring during the fight. . . . Col. Ben Hill, Fifth Tennessee; Lieutenant-Colonel Peebles, Twenty-fourth Tennessee; Lieut. R. H. Keeble, Captain Ridley and Lieutenant-Colonel Neil of the Twenty-third Tennessee, were among the number. General Wood reported that Col. C. A. McDaniel, of the Forty-fourth Tennessee, acted with great bravery and directed his men with good judgment until wounded on Monday. In his own report, Colonel McDaniel said that Lieutenant-Colonel Shied, of his regiment, was badly wounded on the 6th, and that his officers and men conducted themselves gallantly and chivalrously. The Fifty-fifth Ten
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 3
his forces from Nashville with those collected under General Beauregard at Corinth—the latter including the reinforcements fbus, which was evacuated—he organized his army with Gen. G. T. Beauregard second in command, and Maj.-Gen. Braxton Bragg chieuntry. Hon. Jacob Thompson, of Mississippi, aide to General Beauregard, in his report of April 9th states that this advancer was in immediate and active command of the troops, General Beauregard being at his quarters in very feeble health, and hisield about noon, and at 2 p. m. received orders from General Beauregard to retire. Tennessee was represented on all partstal and company organizations under all conditions. General Beauregard, in his report, made honorable mention of Generals Cn that great chieftain received his death-wound. In General Beauregard's report of the battle it is recorded that Gov. Ishae in good order. No pursuit was made or attempted. General Beauregard reports the Confederate loss at 10,699. Swinton fix
... 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15