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September 4th (search for this): chapter 8
e case with applications of this kind, no action was taken in the matter by the Administration. Colonel Rhett remained in command of Sumter as late as the 4th of September. When the last detachment of his artillery regiment was removed he retired, with his disciplined Regulars. From August 17th to that date his journal shows interior and exterior, the Federal breaching batteries and naval forces had made on the fort. See Appendix. The following details, taken from his report of September 4th, forwarded, through General Ripley, to Department Headquarters, show the work which was done at the fort and its condition at that time: * * * Engineerr, said, I visited Sumter, and conferred with Colonel Rhett. Issue the order, General; I will obey it. The order was issued, and on the evening of the 4th of September Major Elliott assumed command of the ruins of Fort Sumter. On the next day the following important communication was forwarded to the Commander of the Fir
September 10th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 8
roops, to the enemy's fire. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. N. T. Beauregard, A. D. C. The events succeeding those we have just related—but which are, relatively, of minor importance—are sufficiently explained by the following letters and instructions of General Beauregard to his subordinate officers, to the War Department, and to generals and citizens of note in South Carolina and elsewhere: Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 10th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—I am instructed to inform you of the arrival from Richmond of a party of one hundred and thirty officers and men, under the command of Lieutenant Rochelle, C. S. N. These men were ordered here for harbor service, and have been directed to report to Captain Tucker. The Commanding General desires you to confer with Captain Tucker, and determine what arrangement may be best to carry on and protect our communic<
September 9th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 8
d up their hands in token of surrender. Had our batteries remained silent until the whole Federal detachment had left the barges, it is probable that the 500 or 450 picked men alluded to by Admiral Dahlgren would have fallen into our hands. But though our success could have been more complete, it was, nevertheless, highly satisfactory, and brought forth the following congratulatory letter from General Beauregard: Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 9th, 1863. Major Stephen Elliott, Comdg. Fort Sumter, etc., etc.: Major,—The Commanding General directs me to compliment you and your garrison on the brilliant success of this morning. He hopes that all future attempts of the enemy to take Sumter will meet with the same result. The General will endeavor to have the prisoners removed in the course of the day or to-night. Should, meanwhile, the enemy bombard Sumter, and you have not enough cover for your command, you will expose the prisoners
September 5th (search for this): chapter 8
ime at that point, rockets should be used there to give warning to our batteries and the navy, and small fires on Cummings's Point might be carefully located so as to assist to indicate it to our batteries without giving material advantage to the enemy. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. The knowledge of the enemy's purpose had been obtained by reading a signal despatch from General Gillmore to Admiral Dahlgren, which ran thus: Morris Island, Sept. 5th, 1863:1.50 P. M. I shall try Cummings's Point to-night, and want the sailors again early. Will you please send in two or three monitors just before dark, to open on Moultrie as a diversion? The last time they were in they stopped reinforcements, and may do so to-night. I don't want any fire in the rear. Please answer immediately. The key by which we were enabled to decipher the enemy's messages had been in our possession for several weeks. It had been obtained as follows: Gen
September 19th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 8
re in constructing bomb-proofs and rifle-pits. 8th. That Colonel Butler, at Moultrie, be directed to employ actively as many of his regiment as practicable in removing the debris from the interior, to throw over the parapet into the ditch of the water-face, under the direction of the Engineer Department, to form a chemise to the scarp. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Jno. F. O'Brien, Major and A. A. G. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 19th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—The Commanding General instructs me to communicate the following orders: 1st. That the batteries about Redoubt No. 1 fire occasionally on vessels in Light-house Creek, if their guns can reach that far without too great danger of bursting. 2d. That Sumter and the surrounding batteries be supplied with a sure and well-understood signal for opening fire in case of another attack by barges. 3d. That Fo
September 15th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 8
ort Sumter be removed to the city? If practicable, request Mr. Lacoste to do so at once. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Jno. F. O'Brien, Major, and A. A. G. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 15th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—I am instructed to communicate to you the following orders of the Commanding General: 1st. That the treble-banded Brooke gun which burst on Sullivan's Island b every measure practicable to give Fort Sumter means for contributing to the general defence of the entrance of the harbor; and, therefore, he desires certain casemates in northeast face, which Major-General Gilmer Promoted, about the 15th of September, 1863. has designated in his communication of the 23d instant, to be put in condition to receive two 10-inch columbiads, one 42-pounder, and one 32-pounder, rifled and banded; these pieces to be thoroughly protected from a rear and vertical fi
stant, to his government, relative to his acquisition of Batteries Wagner and Gregg, contains several errors, which I feel called upon to correct. 1st. Seventy-five men were not taken on Morris Island, for only two boats' crews—about 19 men and 27 sailors, or about 46 men in all—were captured by the enemy's armed barges between Cummings's Point and Fort Sumter. 2d. Colonel Keitt's captured despatches could not have shown that the garrison of Wagner and Gregg amounted to between 1500 and 1600 effective men on the day of the evacuation (6th inst.), for Colonel Keitt reported that morning 900 men, all told, only about two-thirds of whom could be considered effectives; the others being wounded, or more or less disabled from exposure for so long a period to the weather and the incessant fire, day and night, of the enemy's land and naval batteries. The forces holding these works and the north end of Morris Island, during the fifty-eight days siege, varied from 1000 to 1200 men, seldo
August 24th (search for this): chapter 8
Chapter 33: General Beauregard desires the Engineers' reports of the condition of Fort Sumter. conference between Colonel Rhett, the Engineer officers, and Captain Harleston on the 24th of August. additional report of Colonels Gilmer and Harris. General Beauregard resolves not to evacuate the Fort, but to withdraw the Artillery from it, and make it, for the time being, an infantry post. his instructions to General Ripley.-he Recommends Colonel Rhett for promotion. work done by In order to form a correct opinion of the precise condition of Fort Sumter after the bombardment (of which a description was given in the preceding chapter), based on Colonel Rhett's and the Engineers' reports, the following order, on the 24th of August, was forwarded to Colonel Harris: Colonel,—General Beauregard directs that you proceed immediately to Fort Sumter (together with Colonel Gilmer, if agreeable to him), to confer with Colonel Rhett, his Chief of Artillery, and Lieutenan
d from exposure for so long a period to the weather and the incessant fire, day and night, of the enemy's land and naval batteries. The forces holding these works and the north end of Morris Island, during the fifty-eight days siege, varied from 1000 to 1200 men, seldom exceeding the latter number when it could be avoided. 3d. Battery Wagner was not a work of the most formidable kind, but an ordinary field-work, with thick parapets, but with ditches of little depth. The sand thrown up by tn Wagner and Gregg were more or less damaged, and all with their vents not too much enlarged were spiked. The carriages, chassis, etc., were more or less disabled by the enemy's shots and shells. Only 1800 pounds of ammunition (200 in Wagner and 1000 in Gregg) were left to explode the magazines and bomb-proofs; but, unfortunately, through some accident, the fuses left burning did not ignite the powder. 6th. The city of Charleston may be completely covered by General Gillmore's guns on Morr
war. He reported to General Beauregard, at Manassas, and was, shortly afterwards, appointed in the Adjutant-General's Department. He was active, intelligent, zealous, and did good service during the siege of Charleston. He died in the summer of 1864, from exposure to the sun while in the performance of his duties. A. A. G., the much-desired key was finally secured. This important discovery was of incalculable advantage, and enabled the Commanding General to be ever prepared against a surprisll that had been done, since the destruction of Sumter, to perfect the interior harbor defenses and lines in and about Charleston. From General Hagood's narrative of the defence of James and Morris islands, from July, 1863, to the early part of 1864, we take the following passage: In November, President Davis visited James Island. General Taliaferro was absent on leave, and General Hagood in command. Mr. Davis inspected the works closely, going at a rapid gallop, with his cortege, from b
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